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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to buy a 97 YZF 750 in about 3 days, and was wondering some things about this bike. First, why are the Yamaha 750's so rare? It seems most are built for racing. Anyone own one of these? How do you like it? Any advice on how good a bike this is would be appreciated.

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The YZF's were ridiculously overpriced when new, and never sold well. ZX-7's of the same year are a little more powerful, but the YZF is a good handler. They are great bikes, but you may find it difficult to find aftermarket goodies for it.

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'98 Superhawk
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah,

He's asking $6000, and from what I hear, that is not bad for that bike. I hear it won the Daytona 200 2 years in a row, and the Suzuka 8hr endurance race that year. Now all I need is some SLEEP! 71 hrs..... tick, tick, tick....

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Would this be Scott Russell's old Yami?? If so, 6K is a very good deal.



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Tony Anderson
Blue '99 ZX9R
 

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I have a 97 YZF750R. Almost 30,000 miles on it with no problem. For your question why they are rare, my salesguy told me (about 3 or 4 months after I got it) that about 1 out of 10 are sold for street use and not many were imported to the US. The rarest ones are the SP models. They have a removeable rear sub-frame. They were alomst exclusively sold for racing. I saw a 93 YZF750SP for sale for $13,000 at Road America in April. Came with all race-kit parts. They do lack a bit of power, but make up for it with probably the best handling of any 750 in that era. I can keep up with the Ducati's in our group thru corners. The brakes only need 2 fingers for a panic stop (HUGE STOPPIES with 3 fingers).Best thing of the YZF750 is you dont need a screwdriver to adjust the rear compression. It can be done while riding. Love the bike. But the lack of perf goodies is annoying. They are a cold blooded bike. Full choke even at 90 deg to start it for the first time in the day (My old FZR600 started no choke at 0 deg, go figure). Oh the only problem I see with the bike, goes for most YZF's (not the R bikes) and FZR's I've rode, they are sensative to tire selection. Mine use to shake between 40-50mph when I had to put a Dunlop 204 on the front with the OEM Dunlop 202 on the rear. Forget using Battleaxe tires, they make it worse. It will take about an hour to clean the swingarm alone. Watch the speedo cable occasionally, it has been known to unscrew itself on occassion. To replace dash bulbs, you have to remove the whole upper fairing. But with the 97, you got a HUGE radiator, could cool a vette, thats great if you decide to put a FZR1000 motor in the 750 frame.
Good luck with it, $6000 seems like a good deal. I'd ask $6500 for mine. Still runs and looks new (except for the right mirror,bar end and slip-on damage due to a 10 mph drop).

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Rob
97 YZF750R
93 CBR F2 (race)
Youth and talent are no match for age and treachery.
 

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I own a 97 YZF 750R and it is a wonderful motorcycle. It is THE most comfortable hardcore sportbike you will ever find. It will corner with anything on the street. And has very good fit and finish. They didn't sell well because not alot were imported and they were expensive. Suzuki then came out with the GSXR 750 we have today (for less money than the YZF) and the rest is history.)

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