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One of my favorite local roads runs along the eastern base of the Sierra mountains. When riding up in the mountains, I start grinding hard parts at about 60, which is a good velocity limiter for me...some of the roadside cliff drops exceed 1,000 feet :D

However on that favorite road along the base, I find that to get a good lean angle going, I'm approaching 90 mph. Given our wildlife population, coupled with my desire to have fun with my future grandkids, I find traveling at this velocity to exceed my level of common sense.

I am curious as to your opinions on acceptable sppeds that you will travel on public roads and how do you determine the maximum velocity to travel at.

I've seen some threads in the past wherein folks describe going 130+ on country roads. From my perspective, at that speed hitting a small lizard on the road could likely kill you. At 120 MPH, you are traveling at 175 feet per second and it takes a highly skilled rider .3 of a second to apply brakes, or roughly 53 feet before you actually begin to engage your brakes. Given the stopping distances most sportbikes are capable of (note the bike, not the rider) and it would take a highly skilled rider a minimum of 293' to stop from 120mph...about the length of a football field.

So how fast is too fast? Naturally it depends on where you are and the conditions of the road. Your thoughts?
 

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Simply said, I ride too fast. That's why I've only put 3,000 miles on my bike this year as opposed to 10,000 last year.

Riding in itself can to some degree be labeled as exceeding one's level of common sense because it is inherently dangerous.
 

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Tahoe said:

However on that favorite road along the base, I find that to get a good lean angle going, I'm approaching 90 mph. Given our wildlife population, coupled with my desire to have fun with my future grandkids, I find traveling at this velocity to exceed my level of common sense.

I am curious as to your opinions on acceptable sppeds that you will travel on public roads and how do you determine the maximum velocity to travel at.



So how fast is too fast? Naturally it depends on where you are and the conditions of the road. Your thoughts?
You pretty much answer your own question yourself....I do know I ride much faster on public roads than anybody should, but I do it
knowing the risk I am taking. I also do it because that is what makes riding fun to "me"....to quote speeds would only open
myself up to claims of being a braggart or an idiot.
 

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You know what's funny is, I rarely ever get a chance to even look down at my speedo. I'm so focused on where I'm going.

But to answer the question how fast do I go until I'm having fun? It depends on the road. However, since I rarely check my speed, I think the speed at which I start to have fun is when I'm leaning the bike over but not to the edges of the tires. It's at that equilibrium point when I'm leaning the bike and still able to remain relaxed enough to smile. In other words, I have fun NOT at peg scratching speed but about 70% to 80% of that.

There are some roads where you can go 100 mph and still not be scratching your pegs going around a sweeper. I think that's too fast on a 2 lane country road. I'd say under those conditions, 90 mph is tops for me.

Out on open Interstates, I feel real comfortable doing 100+ mph. Usually 110 mph.
 

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[iI've seen some threads in the past wherein folks describe going 130+ on country roads. From my perspective, at that speed hitting a small lizard on the road could likely kill you. At 120 MPH,
Contrary to popular belief this is wrong, I smashed a squirrel at about 140 on my bike on a HW close to my house and barely felt it. Actually corrected speed is probably about 115 or so, anyways I had just time to get to a pucker factor of 10 before I hit it and was expecting the worst. Still here
 

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anyways I had just time to get to a pucker factor of 10 before I hit it and was expecting the worst. Still here
So that's why you replaced the seatcover on your bike :D

I'll give you that, your forward momentum is likely to keep you on the same vector upon vaporizing some furry little thing...I almost got a skunk a few weeks ago. I'll tell you, I'd almost voluntarily vault off my bike than hit one of those vile beasts. You just know if you hit the buggers, they'll bounce up on you and get stuck, leaking out all that stink...it'll stay with you for weeks. :barf:

so, ok, let's go with a slightly larger animal, say 10 pounds (that's how big some of the skunks are around here...even bigger ones in the state capitol :D
 

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Well, I can't actually back this with any facts, but.....

(You know it's going to be good now, don't you?)

I have heard rumored a few different times that if you hit a deer broadside going at least 120 or so, it's actually possible to cut right through it and keep right on going, albeit a little messier than before. This is one of those stories that seems almost possible; if the circumstances were perfect (i.e. the deer doesn't turn to face you). Does anybody actually have first-hand experience with this?

P.S. True or not, I don't intend to test it out, 120 is way too fast for a wooded area with animals to jump out in front of you.
 

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Hmmm...

Let's see an average deer weighs between 150-200 pounds. Multiply that by the inertia of a 600 pound object traveling at 176 feet per second...my guess is that you have an impact force exceeding 3000 pounds per square foot...the equivalent of my wife's GMC Suburban hitting you in a crosswalk at 35 mph.

in a word:

SPLAT

BTW Frankie, what color is that XS-650 you have? I had a really cherry one years ago, but can't remember the year...it was bronze.
 

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FrankieG said:
Well, I can't actually back this with any facts, but.....

(You know it's going to be good now, don't you?)

I have heard rumored a few different times that if you hit a deer broadside going at least 120 or so, it's actually possible to cut right through it and keep right on going, albeit a little messier than before. This is one of those stories that seems almost possible; if the circumstances were perfect (i.e. the deer doesn't turn to face you). Does anybody actually have first-hand experience with this?

P.S. True or not, I don't intend to test it out, 120 is way too fast for a wooded area with animals to jump out in front of you.
It's true. Some guy had a website that showed a deer he hit with his sportbike at around 75 mph. It was a small Doe(about 100lbs) which was hit by a Katana 1100 I think. The pic shows the deer literally cut in half right at the stomack area.
 

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Tahoe said:
Hmmm...


BTW Frankie, what color is that XS-650 you have? I had a really cherry one years ago, but can't remember the year...it was bronze.
Dark green with gold pinstripes, in pretty good shape considering the age. I'm trying to find a sidecar for it, maybe pick up a Golden Retreiver... Well, at least the sidecar, don't really know why, might be good to pick up chicks. :cool:
 

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I don't know..........
Deer getting cut in half at high speed?
People on sportbikes exceeding the posted speed limits?
This all sounds like the start of a good science fiction novel.

You don't expect me to believe that you actually travel on your local highways & city streets faster than the law would allow. Everyone knows that all sportbike owners are fine, upstanding & law obedient citizens, they would never do anything risky on a public road. :drool:
:confused:
I think every bike owner knows that an apparent risk is always there when riding whether they view it on a conscience level or not, they know it exists. That's all part of the allure of riding, going fast, stunting, cornering & impressing the opposite sex with your personal mastery of the machine you chose, whatever the case may be.
We all know "this ride might be our last", we just choose to accept it & not dwell on it. I think that's why most of are still here, when you worry to much about something bad happening, it usually does.

So to answer the question, "How fast is to fast?" is almost impossible, it all depends on the riders feeling of confidence. Some roads I may attempt at a greater speed thinking my chances of seeing the 'Golden BB' are less due to the area I'm in, other places I ride I act more sain than I ever have.
Like Pepsi or Coke, it's a matter of personal taste. :D
 

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Twisties

It's all very well hurtling down a empty road at warp factor 9 and knowingly taking that little risk which makes riding a bike fun, and I agree with Rouge - I rarely look at my speedo, but I've made my mind up by observation (and hopefully experiance!) to go as fast as I can with as little danger to myself as possible.

Then when I hit a patch of gravel round a tight bend and have that burst of adrenaline which qualifies as shitting myself:eek: , I slow down and think how good this life really is.:D

My dad did once kill a cow that was standing on his line through a fast corner. He ended up in a field, the cow killed his Norton Dominator.:( Poor Norton !:crying:

One of the many fine roads near me:
 

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My speed is limited by how far I can see. If I can't see around the next curve, then I don't go faster than my ability to stop the bike in the curve.:eek:
 

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A long essay ...

This would seem to be an increasingly popular question of late! :)

The roads I ride basically fall into two categories:
-Main highways that are overpopulated with cops (mostly roads for getting places)
-Back road twisties (mostly roads to ride for fun)

I try to ride each road on it's merits and the ambient conditions. However I do ride quite differently depending on which of the above categories that they fall into. On the main highways I ride as fast as I am prepared to pay the consequences for. You do the crime, you do the time. If I have been caught fair and square for speeding I expect to have to pay the consequences. Being a poor student I really can't afford large speeding fines and certainly losing my licence would be disasterous. Therefore these sort of roads I generally won't cruise more than 120-130kph. Unless perhaps I'm following someone who is going faster who will hit the speed traps first :D In the twisties in these sort of roads I'll generally keep these same sort of speeds - you're not going to be starting to scrape anything until you hit 55kph corners at those sort of speeds. These roads are usually quite good and visibility through the corners is generally pretty good and most of the corners are constant radius etc.
However, this is only a general guide, and there are areas of these roads where you know that the chances of seeing the red and blues are much less and you might push it up another notch - especially through twisties :D


Twisties/backroads: this becomes much less of a wallet dictated speed, and more of a comfortable safety dictated speed. Like I said originally it very much depends on the roads, their conditions, how well I know them, and the ambient conditions. You're always going to be looking out for potential dangers and these will dictate where you roll it on and where stay your wrist. For instance - short straight between two corners: I'm going to be much more likely to roll it on if there is 5m clearway each side of the road, than if there is dense foliage right up to the edge of the road with driveways hidden amongst it all. As far as max speed in perfect conditions I would probably limit it to about 180kph for short bursts. I would not risk travelling at that sort of speed for prolonged periods.
Corner entry speeds - dictated by how well I know the corner and the conditions etc and how far I can see around the corner. I'll tone it way down for totally blind corners. However there are a few roads that I ride that I will corner at speeds where in a worst case senario I will not be able to stop within the viewable distance. I will have room to play with and options, but a complete stop will not be one of them. I think that most riders who answer this honestly will know that there are times and places where this is true for them also. (Given that for maximum braking you will have to stand the bike up and go straight ahead - and in a corner real estate runs out real fast with this option).
Confidence also plays a major role in deciding cornering speeds. Sometimes I will go out and not feel safe/confident cornering at the speeds I did the previous day. So I will ride at a speed where I feel confident. Case in point this morning - early start to see the first stage of the day for the DayBreaker rally @ about 6:15am. The ranges were covered in cloud and I had to transit them. Still fairly dark, wet, very low vis, not as much sleep as I would have liked, road surface not 100% favourable at the best of times. Cards beginning to stack up. That was one slow trip. But I got there without incident by riding ultra conservative to help tip things back in my favour.

Hope this is of help to someone. Thoughts? Criticisms? Agree/Disagree?
 
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