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Discussion Starter #1
I was just wondering. I just bought it...yeah, I know, I've been riding for 5 years and I'm just now buying this book....and I was curious if you who have read it found very helpful? I've always heard good things about and I'm sure the basic principles still apply even though the book was written in 1993. What are your views on it? Thanks.
 

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I started to read the first one. And although some things I've found very usefull, specifically reference points, I got bogged down in Code's grammatical attempts to sound technical. I hope the second one is better. If it is, I'll have to go pick it up.
 

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I don't know what the big deal is with Keith Code. I think his books are garbage. I found that the first book makes better kindling than the second one, if that helps any?
 

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I am reading TOTW2 right now and it's pretty informative but the biggest part is trying to keep those things in mind when you get out on the road. Trying to remember all of it.
One stupid thing is he has a list of defined words at the end of certain sections but they aren't even motorcycle terms. Most of them are just normal words that I guess Keith didn't know so he defined them thinking that other people wouldn't know either. Seems odd and out of place.
 

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I read the first one long, long ago. Really all it does is make you think about what you're already doing. For a green beginner, I'd say buy it. If you've been riding for a while, I'm not so sure I'd bother.
 

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Skip the first TOTW, go directly to TOTW2

I found going back and rereading TOTW2 helped improve my lap times after 5+ years of "successful" racing. Getting back to the basics made me rethink some corners where I wasn't gaining any ground on my competitors. I started to get complacent with success and it stagnated my learning curve, which in turn stagnated my lap times.

I decided if I stayed in the same class it would be cherry-picking so I purchased a bigger bike. What worked with the smaller bike and talent pool, no longer held water as I was now only top 10 instead of winning. Once I went back to principles, practiced them, I started winning that class as well.

Was reading Codes the only reason for success? No, but it did get me to stop some bad habits that worked against less experienced riders but did hold water against national caliber riders. I would recommend TOTW2 as just another tool that might fix some things but not everything. Now on the other hand a 15lb sledge hammer will fix everything. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wet Shrub said:

One stupid thing is he has a list of defined words at the end of certain sections but they aren't even motorcycle terms. Most of them are just normal words that I guess Keith didn't know so he defined them thinking that other people wouldn't know either. Seems odd and out of place.
I have now completed the first 2 chapters and I see what you mean. The definition thing is way out of place.

By "tigerblade":

I read the first one long, long ago. Really all it does is make you think about what you're already doing. For a green beginner, I'd say buy it. If you've been riding for a while, I'm not so sure I'd bother.
Yeah, I bought the book because I thought it was supposed to be informative on racing maneuvers and a racer's thought process while on the track, but so far the first 2 chapters sound more like a MSF course instruction booklet or something. Maybe it'll get better. I might learn something, ya never know.
 

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I have TOTW2 video. I got it when I got back into sportbikes and found it somewhat useful. As said before, its hard to keep all the points in mind when on the road.

I think a track school day would be better overall, but at a greater expense..

I dunno, I guess it was worth the $20 bucks or whatever it was.
 

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I found that by keeping an open mind and extracting the information from TOTW II, I was able to apply alot of Codes techniques to my riding...

Interesting to compare Freddie Spencer's school of cornering thought with Code's, and apply what works for you...
 

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I am not aware of any other riding books available. I recommend them because they at least lay out an organized approach to things with sound, basic information. I think it can dramatically shorten the learning curve for any rider who is new to pushing the limits a little, and may prevent him from doing something real dangerous while gaining experience. The second book has more specific technique than the first.

The one that's really out in left field is Soft Science of Motorcycle Racing. I wouldn't recommend that one unless you're trying to start some kind of dianetics/cycle/religious cult.:D I think it has a coupon in the back to mail in for a free insence burner.:D
 

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Hmmmmm

Dad said:
I am not aware of any other riding books available. I recommend them because they at least lay out an organized approach to things with sound, basic information. I think it can dramatically shorten the learning curve for any rider who is new to pushing the limits a little, and may prevent him from doing something real dangerous while gaining experience. The second book has more specific technique than the first.

The one that's really out in left field is Soft Science of Motorcycle Racing. I wouldn't recommend that one unless you're trying to start some kind of dianetics/cycle/religious cult.:D I think it has a coupon in the back to mail in for a free insence burner.:D
I have toftw I & II, also have the video...I agree with Birdman,

Dad, I haven't read the soft science yet, but I heard just the oppisite, that it was the better book outta all of them, as far as technique was concerned. Can you tell me a bit more as to why you labled it as a dianetics/cycle/religous cult...:confused: :confused:
 

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Re: Hmmmmm

Hammer 4 said:


I have toftw I & II, also have the video...I agree with Birdman,

Dad, I haven't read the soft science yet, but I heard just the oppisite, that it was the better book outta all of them, as far as technique was concerned. Can you tell me a bit more as to why you labled it as a dianetics/cycle/religous cult...:confused: :confused:
On re-reading that reply, it was a bit much. I got caught up in the heat of the moment.:)

IMO, the best book for the rider beginning to push a little is TotW II because it gives some very practical do's and don't's. Soft Science is much more directed at the racer analizing track times and such, but is also, especially in the beginning chapters, full of off the wall (imo) insights into how the brain works with some real corny analogies. A little too "Twilight Zone" for me. That's where the cult reference originates. For those who question the value and writing style of I & II, they'll go nuts with Soft Science.

I don't think Soft Science will help someone who hasn't read and practiced to some mastery, the basic techniques outlined in TotW II, and might even be confusing. For street riding I don't think it has much to add, but what the heck... more knowledge never hurt, I guess. It is geared more specifically to race track conditions where you're working on improving lap times. For a racer who has already mastered the basics, it is probably a good outline to critique his own track performance in an organized fashion, if he can get past the corny stuff.

BTW, I bought them all. At $20 or so a piece, if you gain anything from them (which I suspect anyone would), it's cheap. If the knowledge saves you a crash... it's waay cheap.

Remember, it's just an opinion... some of the worst reviewed movies did booming business at the box office!:D :D

Edit: I have never seen the movie. As an owner of the books AND the movie, what do you think?
 

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WHINE WHINE WHINE... Why don't you guys quit whining about what you don't like about his books and concentrate on what will help you. I don't care how long you have been riding or how much you think you know. There is something in each of his books that will make you a better rider, if you will look at the posative instead of the negative.
 

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Uh, I think that's pretty much what they all said Gary. They just actually had an opinion that pointed out some of the bad points also so someone might be able to pick whatever book most apply's to them, their style, and their point on the learning curve.
 

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i really liked the second book. i wish he'd put out a video version of it, like #1. the video is a million times better than the book.

however, i liked the second book. i have used his techniques. including saving a low-side by getting on the gas. i think it helps to be aware of the dynamics of the bike and your own natural re-actions. it's like physics class, you get out of it what you put into it.

i also don't think riding has changed that much since 1993.
 

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I ve read both books and I have found the 2nd one to be interesting.
Like FZR400Tony I liked the explanation of the dynamics of the bike. It can help somebody ride smoother than before.
I ve given it to other friends who ride bikes also.

Aris
 

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I read all of Codes books, from the local library; then bought "Twist II" so I would have it when I needed it.

My opinion is that his format gets in the way of his information, but the information is good stuff. Maybe it is "basic" good stuff, but that doesn't take away from its value. Stuff like adding throttle gently in turns, using mostly the front brake, never chopping the throttle when in trouble, being off the brakes to start the turn, working a turn best by a slow entry at first, rather than charging into it... then stepping it up as you grow comfortable on the next times around; this was all good stuff to me.

Others may disagree, but I see sport biking a lot the way I see martial arts. Both are built entirely on good basics with lots and lots of practice. Both require concentration, patience and committment. Both seek to acheive correct reaction, at the level of reflex, without concious thought.

Also, both always seem to have the seekers of the "secret death touch" that will allow them to skip all the hard work, and go directly to "master" rank. :rolleyes:

I think the optimal application of Code's information is, in agreement with Kneedrag, read it and go practice for a while. Then, go look at it again and find something you missed the first time or have grown weak in. Address that bad habit. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.
 

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Joss said:
Others may disagree, but I see sport biking a lot the way I see martial arts. Both are built entirely on good basics with lots and lots of practice. Both require concentration, patience and committment. Both seek to acheive correct reaction, at the level of reflex, without concious thought.

Also, both always seem to have the seekers of the "secret death touch" that will allow them to skip all the hard work, and go directly to "master" rank. :rolleyes:
joss, great observation.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Ok...

Just finished Chapter 4 on Throttle Control and I'm finding the book more interesting.

It's funny because I'm reading this book and I keep thinking back to how much this book would've helped me out about 2 years ago when I crashed my TLR.

I went into a left-handed double apex curve and crashed because I rolled off the throttle to soon. Probably because I thought I was taking the curve at to high of a speed, but if I would've stayed on the throttle just a little longer and eased off instead of rolled hard off, I probably wouldn't have hit the footpeg on the pavement which hit so hard that an "SR" kicked in and I stood the bike upright and ran straight off the bend of the curve and into the grass which sent me tumbling. :eek: Man, if I would've just read a few pages the day before that happened, I might of made the turn. :rolleyes:
 

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The funniest thing in the world...

first of all I love TOTW2, its fantastic.

But the video, I have the video and it is SOOOOO FUNNY.
There are scenes where some dork is sitting on parked bike making revving and engine noises.
HOLY COW thatis funny, plus its like 10 years old.

You must see the video.:D:twofinger :D
 
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