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Discussion Starter #1
This question may sound like a beginners question, but I've been riding with my weight on the outside foot when cornering and hanging. Then I've read that you should put your weight on the dragging foot. I then changed my riding style and found that by applying the weight on the inside foot, I can turn a corner at a much sharper arc.

Now, I've just read the post on countersteering, and to my surprize, some said that the right foot to apply weight on is the outside! So, what do you guys think? weight on inside or outside foot?

By the way, an off-topic question. Why don't choppers have rear suspention? Don't they bounce around a lot?
 

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This is a question I've been wondering about quite a bit lately. Personal experimentation has led me to keep my weight more or less neutral (sometimes a bit on the inside) when leaning the bike over, but as soon as it's leaned into the turn I weight my outside foot. It seems to stand the bike up a little and make it much more stable. I'm very curious to hear what other have to say about this!
 

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Well..

I've been putting most of my weight on the inside foot, but then again I suck. :p It just seems more stable to me with the weight there rather than outside. I'll know for sure when I start taking racing courses next season.
 

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Before you should think about what foot to put weight on, make sure that you are not just placing your foot flatfooted on the pegs. You need to ride on the balls of your feet, like how a catcher sits behind the plate in baseball.

J
 

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i juss finished that chapter in codes book.. from what i remember, to stay stable, weight on the outside, but ima look it up agian, and will post later..
 

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From my experiences of trial and "crash" I have learned to put my weight on the outside foot. When you're cornering and your bike is leaned over, think about where your center of gravity is and where your weight is. If you bike is in full lean and you are weighing down your inside foot, sticky tires won't be enough.

To an ealier post, foot placement seems to be more of a preference. I know myself and a majority of the racers I see are more on their toes, right where the toes connect to the foot. For me when I need to flick my bike quicker in cornering, that part of my foot seems to respond faster than the ball of my foot and when you are leaned over, it may be difficult to keep any other part of the foot planted on the peg or rearset.

Sorry so long, just my thoughts...
 

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As I was told:

Weight the leg opposite the lead counter-steer arm!

Meaning: L Turn (Counter-steer L Arm) Weight Right Leg
Meaning: R Turn (Counter-steer R Arm) Weight Left Leg

Taught by a true master! ;)


Johnny
Team No Limit Racing &#169 1996-2002
http://www.teamnolimitracing.com
 

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Im not sure about the foot thing, but as for the choppers i think the name for it is a riged mount. I think but i could be wrong(if someone knows for sure please correct me), but the fat boys are like that and use some sort of a rubber block for a dampining effect. As for a full fleged chopper ya it is one uncomfortable ride. My dads friend bought a captain america replica bike from i think panzer or something and it came with peter fondas autograph on the tank, but he told the guys he didnt want peter fonda any wear near his bike so he autographed a helmet. Anyways he rode it up to sturgis one year abought eight hours from omaha. He spent most of the day in the tent sleeping the ride off cause it was so bad. I think the main reason is for looks than anything else. That bike halled ass though, but i guess anything else would with only a seat a two gallon gas tank and a alluminum(sp?) frame.
 

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Weighting the "inside" peg promotes slide, weighting the "outside " peg promotes grip. Not my theory but one I read in a story about Kenny Jnr.

When you look at it, the inside peg is on the deck, as is the rear tyre. So weighting it is not unlike kicking the back end out from under you. Weighting the outside peg is not unlike standing up on the bike, which pushes the rear down into the road, and helps the bike stand up under acceleration as well.


:)
 

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Reg Pridmore, in his Class schools, teaches body steering, whereby you weight the inside peg to help initiate a nice smooth turn-in. On the track, that method seemed to help with a good, crisp turn in along with some countersteering.

Keith code teaches the outside peg method. I use both, depending on the cornering situation. On slow, tight turns, I like the outside peg. Higher speed sweepers I tend to use the bodysteering method.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'll try both

After reading some of your replies, and on my way back from work (Turnbull Cayon Rd), I practiced both methods to see which works best.

In one of the tight turns, while my weight was on the outside peg, I went a bit wide. I was getting used to use the outside foot again. Anyways, so I desperatively lean more in mid corner. This manuver has caused the inside peg to drag. If I had my weight on that dragging inside peg, the leverage would definitively cause my rear tire to slide out!

So, I think from now on, I will practice initiating the turn on the inside foot, and switch to the outside during the turn. What do you guys think?
 

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That sounds like a good plan. Experiment, and see what works for you and your bike.

I remember it took me some time to get comfortable with the inside peg method, but once I did, it opened up another cornering option. After a while you don't even think about it.
 

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Ted900 said:
Reg Pridmore, in his Class schools, teaches body steering, whereby you weight the inside peg to help initiate a nice smooth turn-in. On the track, that method seemed to help with a good, crisp turn in along with some countersteering.

Keith code teaches the outside peg method. I use both, depending on the cornering situation. On slow, tight turns, I like the outside peg. Higher speed sweepers I tend to use the bodysteering method.
I agree. I started using Reg's method on my VFR and it worked well for me.

One the RC I tend to keep somewhat neutral but it varies with the situation.
 

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Both. :confused: I am by no means an expert, but have a bit of track and "spirited" :rolleyes: street experience and I feel its as much what your comfortable with as the rest of hi-po riding. Personally I like to initiate "tight" turns (tight meaning "fast for the apex" no mater the actual speed) on the inside peg (ball of the foot & forward only) and "ballance out" the turn on the outside peg. Just seems to help give some smooth input and helps keeps the the suspension settled, especially on a downhill or decreasing radius turn. It does take some practice, because too much too fast, and you will loose the rear tire. :crying: On easier turns I usually try to keep neutral to the outside peg, once again to ballance out the lean and countersteer. Again this is just my $.02 hope it helps. :D
 

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I never gave it much thought until this thread but Ive been doing the inside peg then outside peg weight shift and that works for me. Bobble just curious what difference does it make if you have the flat of your foot on the pegs or not? And if you have the balls of your feet on the pegs can you reach the shifter and brake? On my bike I wouldnt be able to to that.
 

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Like some others said, I use a combination, although I was always taught to weight the outside.

titomike said:
and helps the bike stand up under acceleration as well.
That's not always desirable. Especially if you're getting on the throttle hard mid-corner.:eek:
 

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I read an article by Garry McCoy about his cornering technique.
Basically he said, if you want it to oversteer weight the inside peg, and if you want more grip, weight the outside peg.
He also said that if you're running wide GAS IT! and the oversteer will bring you back on line:eek:
That guy has balls the size of coconuts.
 

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Having recently read about weighting the outside foot in another thread, I've been out trying it. I noticed a bit more stability, but a tendancy to run wide on the turn. As an alternative I then hit a few corners with weight on the inside peg and it seemed to steer a bit sharper. Seems like for me some sort of combination would work the best. Also, I think the term for the chopper is hardtail.
 

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I'm thinking along the same lines as Roadracingirl..although, I'm much slower than she is...:( :D I also have better control on my toes, as opposed to the balls of my feet..I have also started turns weighting the inside..mostly, I do the outside..:D
 
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