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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, Ive been riding a couple months. I have a suzi gsf500. Ive put around 4k on it so far. Im in a situation financially where I can get a 600.
Opinions about wether you think im ready or not IS NOT the point of this thread. Im looking for certain things in a bike and the gsf is not delivering. Mainly what i want is STABLITY and HANDLING. Which 600 is the fast and has the best quaters, i could care less about. Im looking for a bike that I can lay down into a corner and be completly confident in it. I want a rock solid 600, if that makes sense. I dont want any wobbly or shaky front ends.

When speaking with local riders they recomended the gsxr for this style of riding. Im open to sugesstions for RR bikes from any of the big four. I think its mainly down to the RR and the gixxer, from the way theyve been described to me. But if someone says the r6 is the most stable on solid bike out there, so be it.
 

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Sounds like the RR is the bike you are looking for.
 

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YOU'RE NOT READY!!!

Just kidding.

I really don't have any input over which one is more stable, but have you considered the Triumph Datyona 675? That bike is :drool:
 

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Saku39 said:
Im looking for a bike that I can lay down into a corner and be completly confident in it.
...Probably not the best wording here.
:twofinger But it does sound like the RR is the perfect bike for you since stability and cornering is what your looking for. Good luck and have fun!
 

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98Gixxer750 said:
Go sit on some and figure it out for yourself.

Have fun eating pavement Squidly. :squid:
And the award for most rude and pointless post goes to: 98gixxer750!!! Congratulations! Hahahaha:twofinger



I have an 06 RR and I am absolutely in love with it. It handles extremely well and doesn't lack in the speed department either. You definitely will not have a problem with a "wobbly front end" unless of course you are jerking the handle bars;)

Good luck with whichever bike you choose.
 

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traditionally hondas are the easiest to ride and inspire the most rider confidence... there was that one 93 900rr i owned that inspired no confidence BUT, that was a fluke. i think a f4 or the new rr might be a good choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the replies. I like my gsf but, it just seems like its unstable at speeds about 65 or 70. Plus god forbid a gust of wind hit it while im on the freeway, I end up in the turn lane or something.
 

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Unstable?

A GS 500 should not be unstable at 65-70mph speeds. You might want to have some things checked out on the bike- steering head bearings or wheel balance/alignment.

As far as wind gusts are concerned, a new 600 will get pushed around just as easily as your GS. Basically, your GS weighs about the same and has the same amount of fairing coverage as a 600.

In regards to which of the 600's would be the best handling- keep in mind that 99% of riders, yourself included, can't even come close to finding the edge of the performance envelope on ANY one of those bikes. From your perspective, they are all going to handle superbly. For what it's worth, there have been numerous 600 class comparisons in the magazines lately. Sportrider named the Suzuki GSXR-600 as the best. CycleWorld and Motorcyclist named the Triumph Daytona 675 as their pick.

Interestingly, I read another 600 comparison article (can't remember the magazine, but I think it was Motorcyclist as well) where they took a whole cross-section of riders of varying skill levels, from former AMA Champion Scott Russell to ordinary Joes who had never even been on a track before. The results varied dramatically, pretty much all over the board. My point is, motorcycles in general, especially the ultra-competitive 600 class, are all so good these days that it really comes down to your own personal preference. You really can't go wrong with any of them. Besides, being quick and smooth on a bike is 90% up to the rider's skill level. I guarantee you there are guys on this board that could humiliate a GSXR-1000 ridden by an average rider on board your GS 500F at a track. The cheapest and most effective way to make your bike faster and smoother is to work on improving your skills.
 

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+2

I've seen many people get killed by bikes with half the power as the one they are riding. I know that there are people that could kill me with a 250 at the track too:crying:
 

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SepiasSoul said:
+2

I've seen many people get killed by bikes with half the power as the one they are riding. I know that there are people that could kill me with a 250 at the track too:crying:
And 125's.:twofinger

Guess those things can carry a ridiculous amount of speed through corners. Must be fun as hell.
 

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Saku39 said:
Thanks for the replies. I like my gsf but, it just seems like its unstable at speeds about 65 or 70. Plus god forbid a gust of wind hit it while im on the freeway, I end up in the turn lane or something.
have you checked into the suspension of the bike? getting a lil work done can make a world of a difference.

+1 on what everyone else says. if you're not too confident with your GS, take it to an empty parking lot and practice. I have a friend who could drag pegs on his while riding through the canyons. But hey, it's your money, so you buy whatever RR you like. I really doubt you'll feel much difference at your current stage in your riding career. I'd go out and research what features each model has at different years/generations, sit on em and decide from there. :2cents:
 

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I'm not sure there is an answer to this question because a good rider gets good performance out of any of them and a bad rider gets poor performance out of all of them. There's a limit to anything you're riding and it's up to the rider to know where that is and run it there. The very fact that you're asking the question says it all. Sorry, I know it's not what you want to hear but it IS the truth.

Guess what I routinely pass riders with at the track in the novice group. An EX-500. Not so different from what you're on, is it. And I own it because it was purchased for my kids to learn on. I found it quite fun and amazingly capable. Totally stock, even the reflectors, exception is the springs and pinched on radial tires. I continue to use it at the track because it really makes the point..... it's the rider, not the bike. Clean house on long twisty rides, too. Bring your R-1, RRRRRXXXX or whatever you want. If you can ride, you'll hang. If not...

I just went shopping for a track bike to use for track day coaching in addition to the 500. My criteria was very specific. 600 or up, '98 or better, right price..... ESPECIALLY right price! Preferred no Yamahas for the transmissions but would take one of them too...... at the right price. The best 1000 to the worst 600 after springing it right will be only a few seconds a lap difference. I found an '04 636. That will be one fine hot rod.

Based on that knowledge and experience, do you see why I have a hard time coming up with an answer? With that background, what would you recommend?:confused: Good luck though, really. If you find the answer, let us know.:)
 

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Really. Visit a suspension shop and have the front and rear set up for your weight. If you're mechanical, do it yourself. Visit Racetech's site and follow their recommendations. Don't use race set-ups, use street. Finish with a good set of tires. Maybe HH pads up front if they didn't come from the factory that way. Then read books, and/or go to track school, and just practice, practice, practice.

You can do all of that and a lot of track time for the price of a new bike and you'll get true improvement in your skills. Always work on technique, NEVER work on speed. The speed takes care of itself when the technique's right.

That's which new bike I would recommend.;) I hope you can take that in the good spirit that it's offered.
 

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Have your suspension checked as suggested, and have it adjusted for your weight. But since it seems like you have a new bike, I am going to guess it's most likely the rider. If you're having problem with the GS, you'll have the same problem on a 600 or any other sportbike short of a Goldwing. You probably just need more experience riding on the freeway at high speed.

The key is to never use death grips when wind is pushing you, that will always worsen the situation to actually commit you to countersteer more and lead you to the obstacle you're trying to avoid. Take the weight off the bars and grab the tank/bike using your lower body muscles and knees. Have your elbows, arms and wrists parallel to the ground. When the wind blows, go with it, if it pushes you back, lean forward, back and forth, if its unbearable, lean further, so your line of sight is just inches above the windscreen, and belly touching or resting on the tank. When the wind pushes you from left to right, have the knee out of the left side, and use countersteering to gently push back to left, and vice versa.

When passing big cagers, or semi, bring your body close to the bike, again by leaning forward, and accelerate a little more briskly to avoid the windblasts and move away rapidly.

These are the basic techniques that can be picked up as you gain more experience and confidence/comfort. On a 600, trust me, you don't wanna death grip or mess up too often when the wind plays you like a yo-yo, with the slightest whiff of top end throttle (since you're on the freeway and doing high revs), it will send you into a semi faster than you can brake.
 

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Z_Fanatic said:
Have your suspension checked as suggested, and have it adjusted for your weight. But since it seems like you have a new bike, I am going to guess it's most likely the rider. If you're having problem with the GS, you'll have the same problem on a 600 or any other sportbike short of a Goldwing. You probably just need more experience riding on the freeway at high speed.
That's right. Your wind problems aren't the bike, suspension, tires, or anything else but experience. The recommended rework is for getting serious handling going, not keeping it upright in the wind. Good luck.
 

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I have owned an R6 and now have an R1. I still do not know what the R stands for. So please in-lighten me!! What the heck does 'RR' stand for, or mean,\.?

Thanks in advance for the explanation. Not that it matters, just curious. I must have missed something in the last 10 years of being around bikes.
 

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I think the RR in this topic is CBR600RR. What RR stands for can be debated, some claim race-replica, or race-ready, while it can be just some arbitrary designation for a model, like GSXR, or ZX-6R, always carrying the letter R, implying racing-inspired bike. Honda has been using it since the introduction VFR400rr and later cbr900rr.

Pretty common in cars too really, GTR, Type R, RT, SRT, etc.
 
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