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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to be getting my first bike in a couple of months and I'm trying to decide between a dual-sport and the littlest Ninja. I was leaning towards the dual-sport, but I'm not really sure if there are any trails in my area.

So, I need some opinions on this one.

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SR

[This message has been edited by SR18 (edited August 16, 2000).]
 

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Depends on what your ultimate riding style goal is. Do you want to end up as a proficient street rider, or do you want to be an offroad guy? Buy the bike that will teach you the techniques for that type of riding (Ninja for street, dual-sport for offroad; obviously). I myself MUCH prefer street riding over dirt track, so I opted for a Ninja 500 as my first bike. It was a great first bike, and it was cheap too. Let us know what you decide bro. Ride on!!!
BTW: Where are you from? Climate makes a difference in that decision too, I would think.

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~Nick
2000 CBR600F4 -
Lost to the Blacktop God. 4,699 miles in under 3 mos. $8,300 worth of damage to my one and only baby. On the brighter side: Can you say 929rr???
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm from PA. When I first got the idea of getting a motorcycle, I was thinking "sportbike". And that's still what I'm going for........but, when I'm older (in college or later), I wouldn't mind having a 125cc motocrosser around (just for some fun on the weekends once in a while).

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SR
 

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Go for the Ninja/EX500. You can get one in good shape for less than $2,000 and it will allow you to learn good habits for when you get a bigger bike. In other words, you won't outgrow it so fast. I had mine for 2 years or so and it was a great machine.



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Richard M. Poniarski
'00 Kawasaki ZR-7
AMA #674623
NY S666C
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Moderator, ZR-Riders Mailing List
 
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Can't do jumps on an ex500/ninja500R Like a DR400Z!!! I like dualies, they open a whole new world for adventurism!

Although I have a ninja, and it does ok on dirt roads :)

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Whatever that little sheep said is a damn lie !!
 

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I can make an excellant argument that, if a person is only going to have one motorcycle, that a dual-sport is the bike to have.But you must always remember that this type of bike is the biggest compromise machine out there, meaning it will never be the best at anything other than being a great dual-sport.But a good dual-sport thumper(mines a 1982 Suzuki SP500) will give the sports bikes some real competition in really tight,winding roads.They don't have the horsepower, but they are narrow, and really flickable in the twisties.They also can get great gas mileage(mine averages 65 mpg, and can cruise at 55-65 mph).They are light in weight, compared to pure street bakes, and the newer ones stop really well with a single disc at front and rear.Try taking a Ninja down a fireroad, or dirt trail.
I understand the new Suzuki DR400 is a great machine. The Kawasaki KR650 is a bulletproof bike with a huge gas tank(about 6 gallons).Suzuki's DR650 is also a fantastic D-S bike.Honda's big XR650L is a great one too.I like my older Suzuki because I can touch both feet down flat-footed at the same time-the newer ones are way up there.
Having said all that, my other bike is a 1990 Kawasaki EX500(pre-Ninja). I feel like I have a couple of great bikes in both catagories.
I just thought I'd support the Dual-Sport concept. as in this crowd, it's likely to be a little biased.

Birdmove/Jon

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Latest issue of Motorcyclist has review on Ninja 250, which they liked (for what it was). My wife rides a Ninja 500 and finds it very easy to control (her first bike). If you can scratch up the extra $1000, go with the 500 or find a used EX500. Ninja works great for smaller people, too!

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I too support the Dual-sport idea. In addition to the already stated reasons consider 3 more things. first you sound like you were still in school therefore you most likely lack driving experience. On a dual sport you can learn away from cars for a long time unless you live in an urban environment. Second King kenny Roberts trains all his future world class riders in the dirt on small bikes. There they learn how to brake, accelerate and slid bikes in a safe environment. finally dirt bikes are much cheaper to crash on while you are learning.

Good luck!!

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