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Discussion Starter #1
thanks cane. hmmm...so forks are fo suspensions? and i'm going to assume smaller tires = better control, since the center of gravity has gotten lower. am i correct? ok, another question:

What is the compression ratio all about?

Whats the difference between a V_Twin engine and all the other engines?

thanks...

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Discussion Starter #2
i am new to the automotive world much less the motorcycle. i want to know where i can learn what specific parts of the bike funcitons as. i.e. forks, dyno? just so i can get a better understand of motorcycles in case i go out to a dealer and naively believe everything they tell me like when my motorcycle is busted, they say "thats what it's supposed to sound like" also, if you dont mind, can you tell me the most common problems that occur with motorcycles and how to deal with these? thanks

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lots of good books, look for books by cameron (kevin, not kirk).

most dealers don't know crap about bikes, and will b.s. you anyway.

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Tony

the views and opinions expressed by tony (cbrf2boy) are the ramblings of a total idiot. sbw.com, it's administrators, moderators, and members don't necessarily agree with and are not responsible for anything this idiot has to say.

for more ramblings try http://geocities.com/cbrf2boy
 

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What Tony said. ;)

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John

"If Harley made an airplane... would you fly in it?"
 

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OK- let's begin. First lesson- the modern four stroke internal combustion engine. It all began in....

Seriously, though- it would take a LONG time for someone just to give you a basic understanding of motorcycles and their workings. The list of things that can and do go wrong with bikes is enormous. No single dissertation on maintenance is going to effectively cover all of the bases for any given motorcycle.

Your best bet is to do like most everyone else. Read every bit of info you can on the subject, and feel free to ask on those specific things you just don't understand. Most people never learn everything there is to know about riding and maintaining motorcycles, and that's kind of the appeal of it as well. You'll never stop learning, and I don't think anyone could just post once to answer all of your questions completely.

Go to your nearest java-schilling mega bookstore (i.e. Barnes Noble/Borders) and pick up "The Idiot's Guide to Motorcycling" by Darwin Holstrom and the editors of Motorcyclist magazine. I wandered into a bookstore on a business trip once and even though I'd been riding for some time, I found it an excellent source of info. A good read, easy to understand and funny as well.

Other than that- just remember there are no stupid questions, and there is almost always help to be found on the forums. Using the search feature can save you some time as well. Reading is a good way to start, but it can never replace the experience of actually getting out there and riding.

Ride safe and have fun-

'cane

P.S. A "dyno" isn't a part of a bike- it's a measuring instrument used to evaluate a motorcycle's (or car's) power and torque characteristics. Used mainly for tuning and measuring changes from performance accessories.

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Discussion Starter #7
ok...so i'll ask more specific questions. you guys would have to bare with me cuz i ask a LOT of question. :D ok, here's my first...what is the significance of tire size? and what does an inverted 43 mm cartridge fork? alright alright...two questions. sorry. :D

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Tire sizes: significant because they are specifically chosen or specified for each bike's intended purpose or capability. Like certain tires are for maximum grip and performance, others offer lighter handling on smaller machines, some yield great mileage above everything else. The sizes themselves- as an example- I'll use my rear tire. It's a 160/60/17. 160 is the section width (the width across the tread) 160 millimeters. The 60 is the aspect ratio, meaning the tire is 60 percent as tall (height of sidewall) as it is wide. (feel free to correct me if I got that backwards) And the 17 is the diameter of the tire in inches. Or, think of it as the rim size.

A 43 mm inverted fork refers to a size and style of front suspension- namely the forks. 43 mm is the tube diameter and inverted means that the slider moves up into the fork tube, rather than going down into the fork tube- which is most common. Inverted forks are most commonly seen on higher end sportbikes where greater suspension performance is desired.

Confused yet? If someone else reads this- feel free to straighten me out or explain it a bit more. :D

Youngrider: I'd be happy to help you out with other questions you might have- feel free to drop me a line at [email protected] -I haven't updated my profile for the new e-mail addy yet, but either will work. Not that I'm a great source of wisdom or anything- just doing my part to help grow the sport!

'cane

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Here is an excellent article on the difference between 'Cartridge' and 'Damping Rod' forks on motorcycles. (Race-Tech is a great source of info on ANYTHING having to do with motorcycle suspensions)
http://www.race-tech.com/reference/articles/SR08_94.htm

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Fear Green.
 

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Lower centralized center of gravity=good. Smaller tires do not necessarily mean better handling. That's a bit too simplified.

As far as the compression ratio goes- that's one I could go way into depth on. Send me an e-mail if you'd like and I'll introduce you to the magic of the stoichiometric ratio...

'cane

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And while you're explaining to him what "forks" are, Hurricane, try to tell him why he doesn't need a friggin' ZX-11 for his (barely) 2nd bike... :rolleyes:

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A fool and his money are soon partying.
 

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:D :D LOL!

You're right, it wouldn't be right for any of us to suggest anything less than a Hayabusa once he's got a glossed over understanding of the difference between a V-twin and an inline four. (How would you even begin to suggest a boxer motor? That'd probably blow his mind....) J/K youngrider250!

You see, a lot of us have seen first time riders join the forum and post something like "So, should I get the ZX-12R or a RC51? Oh, and by the way- this is my first bike, so- I'm looking for something comfortable." While everyone likes new faces (voices) on the forums, that kind of ignorance is just hilarious to a lot of us. (both of the above mentioned models offer the kind of performance many of us will never fully use- extremely potent street hardware. NOT for beginners) Don't take offense, though. Most of us here except for a few very smart people have been there too.

It's difficult to accept sometimes, but we've all got to start somewhere. I will applaud you on your choice of a first bike, though- way to go! That should be a great bike for you to learn on, and will be fun for more than just the first couple of months.

Anyways- feel free to ask questions- and expect some kidding around, just don't take it personally. We're all one big happy family here, well unless Paul's around- then things get kind of disfunctional ;)

'cane

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Discussion Starter #13
one big family eh? tell that to scotty...hehe...jk. :D so now i got paul and scotty on my back? YIKES!! ok, so i'll steer away from them. i guess they're the problem childs in this big family...hehe...i'll see what i can learn from other pages before i post. dont want to get mad. and redninja already cancelled two of my threads. laterz

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Too Young to ride, too old to not
 

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I think that your choice of bike is excellent for a beginner. My last bike was a CBR250, and it was an outstanding machine to learn on. Unfortunately it died 18 months later when some fine outstanding citizen pulled out infront of me.

I picked up most of what I know about engines from having studied them for my pilots licence. The rest I've just picked up from what I've read.


Compression ratio:
From what I understand: (plz correct me if I'm wrong here guys)
I presume you have a basic understanding of how an reciprocating (piston) engine works. The compression ratio is the ratio of the volume inside the cylinder when the piston is at the bottom, to when it is at the top of its travel. Confused? Basically it's how much the fuel-air (f/a) mixture is compressed within the cylinder.
What does it mean? (Again, guys correct me if I'm wrong) The more you can compress it, the more energy will be released when you ignite it, and the more power it will give out. (More engine wear too???)
The problem is compression creates heat (eg a bicycle pump) and it is possible for your f/a mixture to autoignite before it's meant to. This is bad. This limits the compression ratio that an engine can achieve without pre-ignition. Octane is used to reduce this (it raises the required ignition temp???). That's about all I understand about that one.

V twin = two cylinders, V configuration.
Other engines = most m/c eninges have 4 cylinders, some engines are inline, others again V config.

mmmmm so many curves, so little time!

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Dave
CBR600F3
 
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