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I'm ashamed to say it, but I've been riding for about two months and I STILL don't know what the heck countersteering is (well I have a guess as to what it is but I'm not sure).
 

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If you've been traveling over 20 mph, you've been counter-steering... Simply put, it uses leverage to cause your bike to shift it's weight in order to change direction. Push left-go left, push right, go right. It's really important to know how to effectively counter-steer in order to avoid objects, or to go fast around a race track.

I'll let someone else provide a link or explain the physics. But in mechanical terms, above 15-20 mph, when you push a direction on the handlebar, you cause the front wheel to deviate from the direction of travel. Because of the inertia of the bike, it will want to continue to go the previous direction. But since the front wheel is now out of alignment, the bike will try to trip over in the direction you pushed - effectively shifting it's weight. Since this is most of the battle in getting a bike to turn, it's a very effective tool. I think the first Kieth Code book talks about it well also.
 

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skidmarx said:
If you've been traveling over 20 mph, you've been counter-steering... Simply put, it uses leverage to cause your bike to shift it's weight in order to change direction. Push left-go left, push right, go right. It's really important to know how to effectively counter-steer in order to avoid objects, or to go fast around a race track.

I'll let someone else provide a link or explain the physics. But in mechanical terms, above 15-20 mph, when you push a direction on the handlebar, you cause the front wheel to deviate from the direction of travel. Because of the inertia of the bike, it will want to continue to go the previous direction. But since the front wheel is now out of alignment, the bike will try to trip over in the direction you pushed - effectively shifting it's weight. Since this is most of the battle in getting a bike to turn, it's a very effective tool. I think the first Kieth Code book talks about it well also.
Yup.........try to get Kieth Code's Twist of the Wrist I, and II goes into great detail about countersteering, also he a video out..give it a look see...:D Most book stores have it, as well as bike shops, and dealers......
 

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these men speak the truth. you've counter steered. however, read this http://www.msgroup.org/TIP048.html and get an understanding in your mind. when the time comes for quick decisive inputs, you need to know this. the only way to make it second nature is practice.

i used to ride open handed and push on the bars, trying to dodge road irregularities. just a thought.
 

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I just saw in another post that you took the MSF. I'm really surprised they didn't explain, "push right, go right, push left, go left."
 

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Friend of mine was riding immedately after WWII, then had to give up riding 7 his lovely 350 AJS single in '52 as he had a family & expenses to take care of.
Come mid-80s & he is planning to start riding again ONLY he is reading about this strange thing called "counter steering". Still after a while he realized he had been doing this while riding his bicycle prior to WWII, during the war & while riding his m/cs from '45 till '52.
There is the answer ----- you ride a bicycle & you AUTOMATICALLY countersteer or end up falling off the bike all the time. Thing is at 75 yrs of age he is still riding his 1000cc Beemer & NOT had an accident in his life on a m/c---try that one for size..
I had problems with a chap that bought a 125cc Royal Enfield 'Flying Flea" as he took off with the bike when it came turn while going across the alley he went right into the fence on the other side.
Had me baffled for he was an ex-major in the Army, probably knew more about the bikes we handled then our regular customers/riders.
FINALLY realized he had come from a farm, rode horses, handled horses at with what ever the pulled, drove Jeep, & many forms of trucks, BUT had never RIDEN a bicycle in his life.
Handed him a bicycle (originally our shop with a bicycle shop) & he simply could not BALANCE or handle it. So a week plus learning how to ride a bicycle & then it was easy for him to start learning on his 125!!!!!!!!
 

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When I took my MSF Class countersteering was a very
hot topic. The insturctor drilled into out heads in the
classroom. Out on the range he made us do it over and
over in different course lay outs. All it is: Push left on the
handle bar and go left. Push right and go right.:cool:
 

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Skeeter-YZF said:
When I took my MSF Class countersteering was a very
hot topic. The insturctor drilled into out heads in the
classroom. Out on the range he made us do it over and
over in different course lay outs. All it is: Push left on the
handle bar and go left. Push right and go right.:cool:
Yes but i believe that you dont get a strong countersteering feel until about 15mph. Anything slower than that, while you might countersteer breifly, its not long enough or it doesnt require enough pressure to be noticed.
 

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The bike falls over easier at lower speeds, less effort. Much slower than 15 mph and you can point the front where you want it to go, it's you balancing the bike. At the MSF I remember one of our drills was to almost bring the bike to a stop then make a right or left turn.
 

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Seems like alot of people think that they just push down and lean in the direction they want to go. They claim that it's body-steering by just pushing down. What they aren't realizing is that they are pushing down, but from an angle. Therefore there is a vertical force and a horizintal force. The vertical force is the one they "feel" more, so they think they are pushing down, while the horizintal force is acting to countersteer the bike and go through the turn. They could save a great deal of energy by only countersteering and not expending the energy of creating the downward force, thereby reducing fatigue in their arms. It took me a while to learn this, and I found that once I started only pushing the bars horizintally I turned better and could ride longer without killing my arms. If I am WAY off on this I'm sure someone will correct me, but this seems to work for me, hope it helps! :thumb:

For those that learn visually, here ya go. Forgive the poor quality of the picture, I'm at work and suck at using cad programs.
 

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spicersh said:
Seems like alot of people think that they just push down and lean in the direction they want to go. They claim that it's body-steering by just pushing down. What they aren't realizing is that they are pushing down, but from an angle. Therefore there is a vertical force and a horizintal force. The vertical force is the one they "feel" more, so they think they are pushing down, while the horizintal force is acting to countersteer the bike and go through the turn. They could save a great deal of energy by only countersteering and not expending the energy of creating the downward force, thereby reducing fatigue in their arms. It took me a while to learn this, and I found that once I started only pushing the bars horizintally I turned better and could ride longer without killing my arms. If I am WAY off on this I'm sure someone will correct me, but this seems to work for me, hope it helps! :thumb:

For those that learn visually, here ya go. Forgive the poor quality of the picture, I'm at work and suck at using cad programs.
Might work fine at lower speeds, but when you start gettin over 125 mph, or so, and ya try to make a turn, it takes a bit more to get the bike tipped over, and depending on how your bike's set up, sometimes ya gotta muscle it in a turn...:D
 

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Hammer 4 said:
Might work fine at lower speeds, but when you start gettin over 125 mph, or so, and ya try to make a turn, it takes a bit more to get the bike tipped over, and depending on how your bike's set up, sometimes ya gotta muscle it in a turn...:D
True, but if you're just learning the basics of countersteering, you shouldn't be going 100+ anyway.....:D
 

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NSteveA said:
The bike falls over easier at lower speeds, less effort. Much slower than 15 mph and you can point the front where you want it to go, it's you balancing the bike.
The best explanation i've heard for countersteering was that once the bike is going fast enough where you can "feel it stablize" itself thats when you can really press forward on the clip-ons and feel the effect of countersteering.
 
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