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Hey,
I'm going to be taking a class during the summer at my community college that I'm attending right now. I got the summer catalog and Ive narrowed it down to 2 classes (both Welding) I was just wondering if anyone who has any experience with these could tell me which would teach me more and be more fun to take, thanks.

Welding 100: Introduction to Oxyacetylene Welding; Theory, safety procedures, and development of fundamental skills in oxyacetylene welding.

Welding 101: Introduction to Arc Welding; An introduction to the process of shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) emphasizing theory and application of proper welding procedures.
 

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Over my head.

Sounds cool though, good luck:thumbs2:
 

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Big Dan 35 said:
Hey,
I'm going to be taking a class during the summer at my community college that I'm attending right now. I got the summer catalog and Ive narrowed it down to 2 classes (both Welding) I was just wondering if anyone who has any experience with these could tell me which would teach me more and be more fun to take, thanks.

Welding 100: Introduction to Oxyacetylene Welding; Theory, safety procedures, and development of fundamental skills in oxyacetylene welding.
Welding is fun, and can often save you time and money when things break.

Oxyacetylene is basically heating two pieces of metal to their melting points while adding a "filler" metal into the molten area to be joined.

Go to your freezer and get two ice cubes. Place them together/touching until they start to melt into one piece. You just witnessed the theory of Oxyacetylene welding.:thumb:
 

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Big Dan 35 said:
Welding 101: Introduction to Arc Welding; An introduction to the process of shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) emphasizing theory and application of proper welding procedures.
Also known as "stick" or "arc" welding. You will use a flux coated stick of metal that is similar in composition to the base metal your welding. The flux will burn off during the intense heat caused by the electrical arc and high amperage used by the machine. The electricity at the "striking" point will be more than enough to flash the base metal and rod into an instant molten state. The burning flux will create a "gas shield" that will displace the air/oxygen from the immediate welding area. This is necessary to prevent oxidation of the newly welded area as the metal cools to provide a much stronger weld.
 

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That's a hard call. If you're expecting practical use from it in the workplace, you may want to take the Arc course. If you're doing from a curiousity point and maybe home hobby or background understanding of welding, the Oxy/Acetylene might be better. It is a more universal metal working tool but also harder to weld with. It will give you a nice background that you could probably apply if you were ever to try to add Arc welding skills plus it is practical for home maintenance use. Problem with any welding is it is very dependent on being in practice and that's especially true of gas welding. If you're doing it enough to stay in practice, you probably would be better off with one of the electric welding processes from an efficiency standpoint, and if not, you might still be better off with an electric set-up as they can be more forgiving in technique. Do they have a course that's more general welding practice? If not, take them both. You'll learn the differences and can then choose for yourself.
 

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Its been a while since I welded. Actually, last time was in High School. I found that arc welding was much easier 2 pick up then the torch. Although the torch was nice if you had to cut with it though. I rememeber the first time I tried to weld. Our shop teacher was kinda dumb and didn't stress proper gear and safety to much. As I was doing my first weld a big blob or molten metal fell on my shoe. Needless to say it burnt right thru my shoe and sock and burnt the shyt out of my foot. Every one had a good laugh at me dancing around and cussing. The bastard gave me detention for a few days after he heared all the choice words coming out of my mouth.:mad:

I also have been thinking of taking a proper course as well. When you take it let us know how it went.:thumb:
 

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im not a certified metal fusologist but i do the welding on our houseboat when we bring it up on dry dock to save tons of money instead of hiring a welder. and i would take the stick welding class becase if you learn how to stick weld then MIG welding will come naturally and then aluminum welding will come after that but remember welding aluminum isnt for someone who isnt a seasoned welder. its harder to weld than steel.

if you have the means i seriously suggest that you buy a auto darkerning helmet...b/c it makes welding much much less aggrevating...hope this helped
 

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So what's the difference between Mig and Tig welding? Also do you use a gas shielding or that flux core stuff? I tried looking all over the internet for diffrent information but I just ended up getting myself really confused by all the diffrent abbreviation's for stuff.:(
 

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well you can really cut it down to three types...
TIG = Kinda like brazing use a torch and a metal to mold two peices together using the filler to hold the gap
most difficult
Stick (SMAW) = uses a stick to weld the two peices together with a flux on the outside
medium difficulty
MIG - uses a machine with a wire feed to weld with and argon to act as the flux
easier then gluing somthing together using this method

this will help you better

http://www.millerwelds.com/education/library.html
 

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I would suggest taking the arc welding course because if you get a job welding then you are going to learn the oxy-ace shit. It just goes with the territory.

At one point or the other I've been certified(Navy for some of it) in each discipline. For me and most the stick welding is the most difficult to initially learn but you get fairly proficient quickly. TIG can be more difficult to learn but just depends on your equipment and what you are trying to do. MIG is very easy to do especially if you are good at the others. Once you MIG weld you will never go back. :D Each type has it's pros and cons based on what you are welding, how you weld it, how much there is to weld and what kind of metal you are welding.

TIG uses compressed gas(usually Argon-Nitrogen mix, Helium in some cases) to shield the weld zone.

MIG uses either burning flux or compressed gas depending on what you want to do and the equipment you are using.

Stick welding uses burning flux for the gas shield.
 

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money can be made doing welding but the most money will be made underwater.

i know someone directly who welds for the Ironworkers Union and he gets paid good money for overhead welding. he is continually getting certified in various degrees of welding but he's looking into S.C.U.B.A. becuase underwater welding is where the big bucks are. he said he could work for 2 months out of the year and make enough to not have to work the rest of the year. underwater welding can be very rewarding.
 

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does anyone know or have an idea of when if ever, welding jobs could totally be replaced by robot, or will there always be a need for welding done by man?
 

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Around construction and general fabrication, I can't envision that there won't be hand welding for at least another lifetime of a welder starting today, and likely even longer than that. On the other hand, repeat jobs even in relatively short runs are already being done by robots in some job shops and certainly on assembly lines. That will become more common but the robots will also need to be programmed and operated by a welder who knows what he's doing if only to recognize problems and troubleshoot the operation. It's that same programming and also the higher cost of the machines that will make custom fabrications or trimming out a large fabrication more practical to do by hand. The time you'd use setting up the robot, you might as well just buzz it. Can you see what I'm getting at?

Also, highly critical welding might be automated even on jobs that are short run only because of the quality assurance and the higher cost of a really qualified welder as well as the cost risk associated with a problem. In those instances you might justify the high set-up cost even for a one time weld, if at the end, the quality of the weld or risk to costly parts being welded is dramatically reduced. I would fully expect that to be a trend. I'm thinking high end, like Nuclear containment quality here, not general fabrication.

These are just my musings but I think it's like those who said there would be no more machinists in a few years yet every machine shop still has manual machines even though most have added some level of CNC equipment. Sometimes it's just not worth setting up the whole deal and just quicker to run on a manual machine. And those CNC's still are best operated by machinists who learned to program instead of the other way around. Be the welder who can weld and then learn to program and operate the robot if you're considering it as a career. Study the craft. Be book smart as well as skilled, not just another mild steel "stick burner". JMO:)
 
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