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I was reading an article in this M/C magazine and it said that it's better NOT to use the clutch when you are upshiting when you are on the race track. I was wondering can this be done with a regular bike and would it hurt the bike at all. Im a newb so i just wanted to know should i do this when i get my bike.
 

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I do it all the time. There is no reason that you shouldnt be able to do it on other bikes. All the bike needs to have is a 'close ratio transmission' (it'll say in the owners manual when it talks about the transmission).
For my 1000RR you have to be accelerating at a fair clip, chop the throttle pretty much all the way, shift, return throttle and accelerate. Takes me about 1/4 of a second. Shifts so smoothly that alot of times except that I did the shift, I wouldnt know that the bike is in a higher gear.
 

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Just don't do it on a tranny that has less then three thousand miles on it. Wait until everything is all settled in.

EDIT: Oh, and I always use the clutch, but I don't own a sportbike.
 

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We just went through this LAST WEEK!!! The clutch is there to be used. Take it from an old sod with 58 yrs of m/cing experience, ex-m/c mechanic & ex-owner of two m/c shops & managed a few others.

Present bikes are & Yamaha 600, Honda 929 & will have the addition of a Honda 954 in about a weeks time. Do not own cruisers, but was brought up on Harleys & Indians plus all the others in the late 40s & early 50s.

True once the cog box is well broken in & one is experienced in riding they will be able to barely touch, sort of like a tap, the clutch lever in making the shifts.
 

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Clutchless shifting

Streetbikes aren't racebikes and racebikes aren't streetbikes.
The clutch is there for a reason.

It is possible to shift without the clutch, but why take a chance on a bent shift fork or stripped gear? (and a $1000+ repair bill!)

I once sold a bike to a buddy of mine who felt that the clutch was unneccessary. He blew the whole transmission apart after about 2 months of use.
 

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I just had to replace all the forks and gears in my trany on my R6 because of such abuse. It costed somewhere in the lines of $1500 to $1800 to fix the trany. It's not worth the money if you ask me. I always use the clutch now!
 

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I have no desire to shift my bike without the clutch.
 

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Hey Smitty, sorry to hijack this thread, but I was just wondering how you liked your 919 since I am seriously considering one myself. Thanks!

phil [at] pkulak [dot] com
 

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One area I hadn't messed with much until my last track day was clutchless up shifting. The bike seemed to take it really well from 3rd up to 5th but only when she was pretty high in the rpms. I thought I'd practice it a bit on the street and my experience was less than pleasant. 4-5 went ok, but it got progressively more abrupt as I started closer to 1st. Yes, the rpms were lower.

Anyone have suggestions on making these smoother? I blipped and had pre-pressure on the shifter for each change. I haven't used it on the street since the single time following my track event.

As an aside, I discovered that my shifts into second are far more accurate. Previously I'd have quite a few mis-shifts because the gearing wouldn't get all the way into second, leaving me with a revved neutral :rolleyes:
 

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Under hard acceleration, I'll normally do clutchless upshifts on the Gixxer. Handles it just fine. Put some pressure on the lever, and then roll off the throttle, pop the shifter, and back on the throttle all in the blink of an eye. Kanwisch, it sounds like you're doing things that exact same way, so I can't imagine why you'd not be having smooth shifts, except that you are too low on RPM's (it seems that lower rps, or slower acceleration make for rough shifts w/o the clutch). That, or it could just be Suzuki's usual superiority.
 

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I have no problems with clutchless upshifts on my Kawasaki. Most of mine are at traffic speeds under moderate acceleration, under 8000 rpm. I don't blip the throttle or put pre-pressure on the lever - just let off the throttle, pull up the lever, back on the throttle. It's very smooth if the timing is correct. If you're still in the throttle when you shift it will be very abrupt and feel clunky.
 

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only kool kidz clutchless upshift, if ya aint kool use ur clutch.
but if you wanna try and be cool. do it, then while your riding around town shifting, ppl will be like "damn did you see that!!!, that kids fu*king awesome!!
 

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I tried preloading the shifter and shifting w/o the clutch for the first time a few weeks ago.. It was sooooo not smooth the first few times but I think I got the hang of it now. :D Though from everything I've read it looks like it's only real benefit is slightly faster lap times on the track. IMO it's a good skill to have but I don't think it really matters if you use it on the street.
 

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My 2 cents worth.......

From, "TOTAL CONTROL High Performance Street Riding Techniques", by Lee Parks, page 65,
"Upshifting
The basic upshifting technique involves preloading the shift lever by pressing down with just slightly less force that that needed to engage the next gear. Next, quickly roll off the throttle approximately 25 percent of its twisting range. When this happens, the torque force on the transmission will temporarily unload, and the preloaded shift lever will now snick into the next gear. For regular shifts at less that full throttle, a simultanious, light stab of the clutch will help ease this process. For full-throttle "speed shifting," no clutch is necessary. In fact, it's actually harder on the transmission to use the clutch in this type of situation than to just let the loading forces do the job. Most riders are amazed the first time they find that they don't need to use the clutch in high-performance shifting. These techniques will make the ride noteceably smoother for passengers as well."

I'm currently breaking in my new 07 GSXR 1000. Never been on a track yet.
Reading and practicing everything.

I reluctantly tried Parks technique. Seem to work perfectly. Went back to using the clutch for comparison. I'm pretty good with the clutch. I could NOT shift as smoothly using the clutch as compared to using Parks technique. VERY smooth, VERY fast, and I'm not using anywhere near WFO throttle.

I recommend Parks book highly

Mark
 

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...For full-throttle "speed shifting," no clutch is necessary. In fact, it's actually harder on the transmission to use the clutch in this type of situation than to just let the loading forces do the job...
Interesting comment. Vash, as our resident techno-geek, what's your take on this?
 

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I clutch it mostly, if I am on a straighaway, I might not use it though.

It's hard to get used to though. I have heard both sides of this though, so it's really up to the rider. Personally, I would use the clutch at all times when breaking in a new bike. :2cents:
 
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