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Discussion Starter #1
well ive been riding for 3 months on my 250 and im interested in buying a bigger bike when ive driven for a year and well im just after your preferences guys on which bike would be worth looking into

2005 Z750 Kawasaki

Suzuki SV650

Suzuki GS500

S40
 

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Which bike to upgrade to

My own preference would be 1 to 4 in the same exact order you listed them.
 

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ExplodingCommod said:
well ive been riding for 3 months on my 250 and im interested in buying a bigger bike when ive driven for a year and well im just after your preferences guys on which bike would be worth looking into

2005 Z750 Kawasaki

Suzuki SV650

Suzuki GS500

S40
After you've ridden for the year, you should be able to jump on the SV650 without a drama. Some people consider this to be a great first bike, but it'd be a good step-up from the 250.

You'll probably just be bored with the GS500. Don't know anything about the Z750 or S40.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the advice man the more information the better though , considering im still new to this. To be a little honest though i have a small fear of sport bikes lol *shrug* could keep me alive
 

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Fearing sportbikes is overrated (unless you're referring to literbikes), it really is the same concept, once you gain good experience on beginner bikes (250) and intermediate bikes (sv650), going into 600 should be no problem, same principle, just handles better at high speed and respect the top-end.

I've taken MSF where older students or guys interested in cruisers were raving about how sportbikes are coffin on wheels. If anything, being on sportbike might just save your life compared to a bike with 1 disc braking. Because on the road, cages don't care whether you're riding a cruiser or sportbike, you're vulnerable just the same.
 

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The Suzy SV-650 for sure. Also it is really not a sportbike when compared to the hot trotting 600cc fours churned out by Honda, Yamaha, Suzy, & Kwacker.

This was a bike engineered to be a bike that would be fun to ride & not a sort of replica of a road racer.

The V-twin gives the bike nice torque at lower revs & throughout the the bike is not as fussy or non-forgiving as a 600cc sportbike.

Remember there is the SV-650 & the SV-650S. The SV-650 is with more of a regular riding position. Like the handlebars are one piece bolted on top of the fork yoke while the 650S is with clip-ons that will forced you to lean forward to reach them. Also the 650s has the footrests set a bit farther back & a bit higher up which is more in line with the learn forward riding position of a regular sportbike.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

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Z_Fanatic said:
Fearing sportbikes is overrated (unless you're referring to literbikes), it really is the same concept, once you gain good experience on beginner bikes (250) and intermediate bikes (sv650), going into 600 should be no problem, same principle, just handles better at high speed and respect the top-end.
.

Not sure if 3 months is enough time to gain a good amount of experience...??? I think it's dependent on the rider...and even then, I'd still question whether or not they should step up at that point to a sportbike...


Re: fearing sportbikes.......you had to know I'd spout off bout this..:p I gotta disagree..there's a huge difference riding a 250 compared to a 600 xyz sportbike. Basic's are about the same, but thats where it ends imho..

Most all the people I know that began on Ninja 250's, and rode them for a yr. or so...are now all very good riders, all have upgraded to larger sportbikes, and they do track days...and guess what..? they are amoung the fastest riders out there, and guess what else..?

They Seldom ...if ever crash..:D cuzz they got that outta the way on their 250's....;)

Disclaimer.....this may not be true of every rider, but I'd guess the above fits about 98% of the riders out there..
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hammer 4 said:
Not sure if 3 months is enough time to gain a good amount of experience...??? I think it's dependent on the rider...and even then, I'd still question whether or not they should step up at that point to a sportbike...


Re: fearing sportbikes.......you had to know I'd spout off bout this..:p I gotta disagree..there's a huge difference riding a 250 compared to a 600 xyz sportbike. Basic's are about the same, but thats where it ends imho..

Most all the people I know that began on Ninja 250's, and rode them for a yr. or so...are now all very good riders, all have upgraded to larger sportbikes, and they do track days...and guess what..? they are amoung the fastest riders out there, and guess what else..?

They Seldom ...if ever crash..:D cuzz they got that outta the way on their 250's....;)

Disclaimer.....this may not be true of every rider, but I'd guess the above fits about 98% of the riders out there..
I dont plan to upgrade till my year is up though. I'm also riding rain or shine every day to gain enough experience possible
 

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Hammer 4 said:
Re: fearing sportbikes.......you had to know I'd spout off bout this..:p I gotta disagree..there's a huge difference riding a 250 compared to a 600 xyz sportbike. Basic's are about the same, but thats where it ends imho..

I also mentioned picking up an intermediate bike in between (like SV) :). That way, those who feel 250 is way too boring, they have the choice of upgrading to SV and still have a relatively powerful but decent enough to make a few mistakes on and gain experience that way. Makes a lot more sense than going from 250 two cylinders to 600/750/1000.
 

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Z_Fanatic said:
I also mentioned picking up an intermediate bike in between (like SV) :). That way, those who feel 250 is way too boring, they have the choice of upgrading to SV and still have a relatively powerful but decent enough to make a few mistakes on and gain experience that way. Makes a lot more sense than going from 250 two cylinders to 600/750/1000.

And, don't forget the 500's...as a starter, or intermidate bike...:D


I'd agree on steppin up from a 250 to a 750, or a 1k...but as for the 600...I've known a few riders that have dun it...and it worked out pretty good...I'd have to say..that it all depends on the rider..If the 250 just used the bike to do short "cruises" for a year, I wouldn't count that as having much experience, also depends on How the rider rode the bike...so..lots of variables there.

JFTR.....when I always recomend a 250 ...I'm Guessing as to what the rider is, and will be like, i.e. how much, and how they intend on riding the bike...so I'm always gonna error on the small side, if there's any question as to whethere or not I'd recomend a bigger bike.

Wanting a bigger bike is a matter of ....cuzz the sportbikes look cool, welp....you can ride a 250 almost as fast, and in some cases Faster that you can ride a sportbike...:D

End of babbling...:p
 

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After riding your 250cc around for a year I honestly don't think you'll have a problem with a 600cc bike. My first and current bike is a 2004 Honda CBR600f4i. Haven't had a close call yet and am doing pretty good on it if I say so myself. I think the most important thing in deciding on what bike to get is how you use your noggin. I understand what my bike can do, and I know my limitations, this is why I feel I've done as good as I have so far. So just use common sense and you should do fine on a 600cc sportbike. The stories of how bad of a bike a 600cc sportbike is as a starter bike, is blown out of proportion in my opinion :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
im just after something thats fun as hell , great around corners , has passing power ( my 250 barely does :rolleyes: ) could get me to work and back , and get me around college and the city. Oh and roadtrips ! cant forget those lol
 

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Smith said:
After riding your 250cc around for a year I honestly don't think you'll have a problem with a 600cc bike. My first and current bike is a 2004 Honda CBR600f4i. Haven't had a close call yet and am doing pretty good on it if I say so myself. I think the most important thing in deciding on what bike to get is how you use your noggin. I understand what my bike can do, and I know my limitations, this is why I feel I've done as good as I have so far. So just use common sense and you should do fine on a 600cc sportbike. The stories of how bad of a bike a 600cc sportbike is as a starter bike, is blown out of proportion in my opinion :eek:

I'll take exception to your last statemnet....hang around for a few years....what newly made riding friends, that started on 600cc sporbike Die, for no good reason, other than they couldn't control their bikes..Had they been on 250's or even a 500 and not had he power that a 600 does, and the fact that a 250 or 500 is considerably easier to flick, as in get it outta he way...they might still be alive today. Granted some do o.k. on 600 for a starter bike, although most, not all never learn how to really ride it, plus you guys spend a good month just gein over being Scared of the bike, when you could have used that month to gain some riding skills, rather than jus trying to survive..

So...no, I don' think the idea ha a 600 is a bad idea Isn't blown out of proportion, I also hope you have good sucess with your riding..:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hammer 4 said:
I'll take exception to your last statemnet....hang around for a few years....what newly made riding friends, that started on 600cc sporbike Die, for no good reason, other than they couldn't control their bikes..Had they been on 250's or even a 500 and not had he power that a 600 does, and the fact that a 250 or 500 is considerably easier to flick, as in get it outta he way...they might still be alive today. Granted some do o.k. on 600 for a starter bike, although most, not all never learn how to really ride it, plus you guys spend a good month just gein over being Scared of the bike, when you could have used that month to gain some riding skills, rather than jus trying to survive..

So...no, I don' think the idea ha a 600 is a bad idea Isn't blown out of proportion, I also hope you have good sucess with your riding..:thumb:
Man ive made it this far and i havn't ruined my new bike yet. I just hope after my year is up the tranisition will go allright.
 

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ExplodingCommod said:
Man ive made it this far and i havn't ruined my new bike yet. I just hope after my year is up the tranisition will go allright.
Just use your GOOD common sense, and judgment....:thumb:
 

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Hammer 4 said:
Had they been on 250's or even a 500 and not had he power that a 600 does, and the fact that a 250 or 500 is considerably easier to flick, as in get it outta he way...they might still be alive today.
I'm going to have to disagree, I don't think 500 can possibly flick any easier than 600s. 600s have much better suspension these days and weigh about the same if not less than 500. 250 might flick easier, but that's like featherweight 300 lbs. The only difference is that confidence in flicking, if 500s can be thrashed into corner easily because of less power and then novice riders have less to worry about it this way than on a 600.

Also as you said, different riders adapt differently. Well, where I live, we hardly have any curves. So far I only found this one road with moderately challenging, but measly 2 curves - 35 mph twists in a residential area - and so I just end up practicing there regardless of dangers and many close calls. Road kills, sands, oil spills, you name it. So my point is, unfortunately in area like these with mostly straight roads, you might as well go with horsepower of a 600. Not that I am promoting 600 as a first bike. I still love cornering with my SV.
 

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That's dry weight, expect around 400 lbs with fuel. Still, it's less than my F4, and SV will feel much lighter. Just watch the clutch lever, it's a little heavy than what you're probably used to, and even if you rev it a little and launch it, it'll take off like a bat. Just feathering the clutch is sufficient enough to get moving, so it is very torquey. Very fun and versatile bike.
 
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