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Not that we didn't know it was bad....:laughing:

'Torque' Tanks
By Christopher Pitoun
Michigan Daily - U. Michigan

Weak plot, characters throttle flashy 'Torque'
January 20, 2004 (U-WIRE)
With "The Fast and the Furious" and "S.W.A.T," one must be willing to forgo certain levels of artistic quality in pursuit of mindless entertainment. "Torque" manages, more than any of its predecessors, to test the limits of critical audiences and their willingness to lower their standards.
The stunts and feats showcased in "Torque" are so overly elaborate that they make Neo's achievements in "The Matrix" look like they could happen in the real world. Instead of being mesmerized by their tricks, viewers cannot help but laugh at the ridiculous spectacle on screen. Sure, characters in action films are supposed to be somewhat superhuman. Films are allowed to go slightly past what is ordinarily possible. But "Torque" makes no apologies for not even bothering to explain why these ludicrous characters can perform actions that are nothing short of feats of God.

The story begins when Cary Ford (Martin Henderson) returns to the Southern California biker world six months after he disappeared to Thailand. Upon returning home, he is greeted by his furious girlfriend, Shane (Monet Mazur), and a rival gang whose drugs he lost to the hands of the law.

The performances in "Torque" are downright shameful. It seems the priority was to create as attractive a cast as possible. To be fair to the leading actors, however, the script affords them little opportunity to shine. The dialogue is more appropriate for a high school film project than a big-budget Hollywood release.

"Torque" is not even able to find salvation in its overdone special effects. The final action sequence is so poorly done that it looks more like a videogame than a film. The sound mixing is also indicative of how little care was put into the making of this film. There is a scene where the characters' lips move and yet there is no corresponding dialogue -- only silence.

Producers Neil H. Moritz and Brad Luff have managed to successfully continue their downward slide. This return to their original formulas of fast engines and attractive women demonstrates that perhaps there is a limit to such an appealing combo -- even with ever-expanding budgets.

From the shameless advertising of Pepsi products to the characters' injury-free survival of outrageously dangerous stunts, "Torque" does not hesitate to insult the intelligence of the audience. Wasn't the lesson of the 2003 summer film season that the audience was not as stupid as studio executives thought?

Copyright 2004 Michigan Daily via U-Wire
 

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"Torque" manages, more than any of its predecessors, to test the limits of critical audiences and their willingness to lower their standards.
The stunts and feats showcased in "Torque" are so overly elaborate that they make Neo's achievements in "The Matrix" look like they could happen in the real world. Instead of being mesmerized by their tricks, viewers cannot help but laugh at the ridiculous spectacle on screen"

Lol. I love that part.

I actually came into this forum today to talk about my "torque" experience at the movie theater. Yes i broke down and went to see it. During the train scene, somebody behind me got up, walked to the end of the isle, and whipped his cup of pepsi at the screen. About 10 or so people cheered from around the theater and walked out with him.
 

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Tippmann said:
During the train scene, somebody behind me got up, walked to the end of the isle, and whipped his cup of pepsi at the screen. About 10 or so people cheered from around the theater and walked out with him.
That is fucking hilarious.:cheers: :burnout:
 
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