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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been riding nonstop since 1982 in Fla. and all across the country. I know a lot of people, including me, crash a lot in that first year or so on the street. Here are my top ten strategies to live thru the steep early learning curve;
10. Ride more not less. Ride to work, store, vacation, everywhere, nothing is a substitute for hours on the bike.
9. Increase visibility. Reds, blues and blacks are not eyecatching, off-yellows are.
8. Increase the visible cross-section of the bike. Studies show drivers have a hard time picking out small bikes from the background visible field of view. Turn signals as running lights, moving around inside your own lane, etc.
7. Intersections, slow down, not speed up or maintain speed, this is where most accidents occur.
6. Start stopping the bike the moment when the cagers start screwing up. They will do the rolling stops, lane changes, turn into you-s etc, start STOPPING at first sign of screw up (checking rearview mirror as well).
5. Travel about 5-10mph only over the prevailing speed of traffic. It keeps you in the danger zone, around each cager, for less time without surprising them by blowing by at mach 3.
4. Race on the TRACK.
3. Don't ride with folks that want to turn every ride into a RACE.
2. Learn to ride at all time with your right hand in a claw, two fingers always covering the brake lever. It increases your reaction time by a half second or more. Pretend you don't even have a rear brake connected.
1. SLOW the f*** down, see number 4, RACE on the track.
PEACE, and remember if you do crash make like a ragggedy ann doll, the muscles tightening up around the bones cause them to snap.:cool:
 

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DIRTYCURTYD said:
I have been riding nonstop since 1982
don't ya think it's about time you pulled over and got a cup of coffee? :D :cool:

great post actually. just couldn't resist....
 

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the one that helps me the most

:) pretend no one can see you-mostly you wont be pretending- you are a solid ghost on the road:D
 

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Goo one, but allow me to modify one ---

---& add two others. Spread #2 to include BOTH hands with two fingers out & over f/brake & clutch lever.
NEW would be: keep a proper STOPPING distance from cages & fellow riders at all speeds.
New would be: NEVER count on a cage to obey the law like stopping, signalling, etc.
 

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Great post, especially for guys like me. Thanks
 

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An observation if I may; when stopped at a light in a line of traffic, stay toward the centerline. The cager turning left from across the intersection will be able to see you better. This is especially true if you're behind a truck.
 

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Wear your gear!!!! Nothing looks hard until you hit it:eek:
Have good wet weather gear if you're going to brave the wet conditions. Its amazing how much more confident you feel when you aren't soaked to the bone with frozen klackers:crying:
 

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2. Learn to ride at all time with your right hand in a claw, two fingers always covering the brake lever. It increases your reaction time by a half second or more. Pretend you don't even have a rear brake connected.


Yes and no....

Certainly "commuter" street riding, as opposed to scratching, is like riding a tarmac motoX track and I ride accordingly. Covering both clutch and brake with one finger on each lever. But in dodgy conditions its nice to use both, but apply the rear hard/harder than the front to get a feel for the grip level. That includes p*ssing rain, oily/diesel covered intersections, painted pedestrian crossings etc.

If the rear locks you can just release it a bit. If the front locks that can really hurt :(

Scratching is a different kettle of fish. Only use the rear mid corner to control the back end.

:)
 

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rear locked, release it? I thought above 20mph this would high-side you?

summer time and wet weather. at red lights/intersections the center of the lane is an oil slick... avoid riding/stoping on in the wet stuff, especially first rain after a few dry days. in summer this same area will have nice little puddles of radiator boil over, slick as snot. you don't want to rice through/stop on/put a foot down in this stuff
 
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