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I put on about 100 miles today, around town and cruisin out of town to visit a friend. I was about 1/4 mile from the garage, and rounding my last corner at an intersection to go down the road to the garage. taking the left turn, i hit a patch of sand, it threw my tire out to the right, so i threw my left leg down to keep it up, and when it leveled back out, i was going straight towards a curb at about 15mph, so i yanked the front brake and tried to turn away from it so i wouldnt hit straight on if at all.

well, i got to the sand at the edge of the road and down she went. i tumbled off, left wrist hitting first and rolled over a couple times. i had my full suit on, so i'm not cut or scraped, just a little sore from smacking pavement. i think my left wrist and shoulder took it all. i lifted the bike back up, started it and let it run for a minute to make sure it wasnt leaking or anything, and rode it to the garage. looks to be all cosmetic damage, but those cosmetics get expensive

the picture attached is the corner i was taking. the blue line is the line i should have taken, but the red is where i got thrown to by the sand, and where i ended up. (and sorry the drawing sucks, my hands are still a little shakey, for obvious reason)

 

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Glad you are ok.... bikes and plastics are replaceable. It is most dangerous within 5 minutes from you're house. You ride it all the time and tend to kind of slack off. I dumped my bike last spring 3 turns form house at about the same speed. Nothing hurt more than my pride and my plastic ended up with a small battle scar. Had to replace the slider on that side too. Hope you had sliders on there, they save tons of damage. If you didn't they should be your next mod.
 

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Sorry to hear about your spill, and I'm glad you made it out in good shape.

The important thing now is to learn from it, and not do it again!
Plastics aren't cheap, but neither is surgery so consider yourself lucky. And as TMP said, accidents do occur close to home. I had my first wreck pulling out of the driveway, so you can't get much closer than that!

And remember in the future that grabbing a handful of brake and turning the bike at the same time is usually counter-productive.

Good luck getting her fixed back up :cheers:
 

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Good on ya about the gear. You can find parts for the bike. Not for yourself.

Maybe a little less riding until you hit the class?
 

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Agree that a little bit of grit can send you in to even more crap & after that you are pretty well finished. Thankfully you were with proper riding gear & the bike as only cosmit damage that can be corrected.

Places I always have an eye for bits of grit at the exit/entrances of most fuel stations & more so if the place had a car wash.

Always on the bends especially early in Spring or when there has been a big rain for if you live in hilly country (as I do for I live in the heart of the Cdn Rockie Mtns in Province of B.C.) crap will be washed down to the roads in many places.
 

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+1 on the gear wearing. And as a general announcement, this is a key reason why we suggest a used bike for starters. The chances of it going down, either riding it or just simply forgetting to put the kickstand down, are pretty high.

Glad you're ok but let us know how the wrist/shoulder are the day after ;)
 

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Glad to hear you've came out ok. Props for great illustration!
 

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Props for being manly enough to post up your crash announcement, especially after everybody on this forum gave you so much heat for getting an R1 for your first bike! Glad you had the gear on and are ok.

Did you happen to have a set of sliders installed?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Props for being manly enough to post up your crash announcement, especially after everybody on this forum gave you so much heat for getting an R1 for your first bike! Glad you had the gear on and are ok.

Did you happen to have a set of sliders installed?
:( no sliders. what really sucked is i was intending on ordering them the monday after the wreck, as soon as my pay check came in. I havent ordered them yet because i've been putting in a little extra research, i figured the damage is already done :)

the wrist and shoulder are perfectly fine. the shoulder ended up being a little sore in the morning, but was gone by the second day. the day after the wreck, i got back on and rode out of town to work. i knew that if i didnt get back on the horse right away, i'd be intimidated by it whenever the next time i was able to ride came around.
 

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wow that sucks.. i really want to get a bike but i have never ridden one before. Kinda hesitant about it tell you the truth. Let me know if i can do anything for you about the plastics. I just got some plastics in from cali and it only cost 16 dollars for that guy to ship them DHL.. later nick www.bandndesigns.com
 

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:( no sliders. what really sucked is i was intending on ordering them the monday after the wreck, as soon as my pay check came in. I havent ordered them yet because i've been putting in a little extra research, i figured the damage is already done :)

the wrist and shoulder are perfectly fine. the shoulder ended up being a little sore in the morning, but was gone by the second day. the day after the wreck, i got back on and rode out of town to work. i knew that if i didnt get back on the horse right away, i'd be intimidated by it whenever the next time i was able to ride came around.
That's what you have to do, Joe. Get back on, see what it was that caused that. Heck.. go back there and tell yourself how you could have done it differently.

Riding these things, whether they be a 1300 Hayabusa, or a Rebel 250 is all about constant assessment. Assessment of yourself, your machine, your abilities, your surroundings. Don't be intimidated, but also remember to always assess. And if the outcome is less than what you'd wanted, assess the situation again.

Good on you for discussing it. That means you are still assessing.

Are the road conditions improving up there enough for you to get some decent riding in yet?
 

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That's what you have to do, Joe. Get back on, see what it was that caused that. Heck.. go back there and tell yourself how you could have done it differently.

Riding these things, whether they be a 1300 Hayabusa, or a Rebel 250 is all about constant assessment. Assessment of yourself, your machine, your abilities, your surroundings. Don't be intimidated, but also remember to always assess. And if the outcome is less than what you'd wanted, assess the situation again.

Good on you for discussing it. That means you are still assessing.

Are the road conditions improving up there enough for you to get some decent riding in yet?
since the spill, i've put on about 350 miles, so i'm definitely still on the horse :) It's been raining quite a bit the last couple weeks, so all the sand is getting washed away, but i'm still not trusting corners. i also took my first ride in the rain tonight. with the delightful 45*, i decided it would be a good time to teach myself to ride in the rain, being there wasnt any traffic out.

with riding in the rain, what needs to be done differently? i figured out to avoid puddles, and i'm assuming slow down even more than usual for corners. i'm also assuming that i should avoid the painted lines, i bet they can get slippery when wet?
 

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The most important things when riding in the rain is maintaining excellent throttle and brake control. (hard for a newbie) Tires slide a lot easier when braking in the rain. Rear tire spins a lot easier as well, with all of their torque, this is especially true of literbikes. And yes, painted lines do get slippery in the wet.

Personally, given your extreme newness, combined with the fact that you have a literbike, I would advise against riding in the rain at all until you've gotten some more experience. Riding in the rain sucks anyway, you're not missing that much!
 

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A few tips for the rain, ZX covered some of them:

The first 30-60 minutes after rain starts are the most dangerous, especially if there hasn't been rain for a while. Oil and other particles that are in the asphalt rise to the surface and make the road slick. The more rain, the more they will wash away.

Don't be too aggressive with brakes or throttle. If you lock up your front tire, release the brake and then re-apply gently. If you lock up the rear brake, it is best to keep it locked until you come to a stop, because if the bike gets too sideways and you release it, you and the bike will go down. Of course there are situations where this is not the case, and that's why experience is recommended.

The painted lines do get slippery. IIRC, spicersh took a spill due to these (I could be wrong, it's been a while since I read that post, sorry if that's inaccurate).

Go easy in the corners, and watch out for watter running down the banking in curves. Losing the front or rear in the middle of a corner is not fun, as you have already found out.

Be safe out there.
 

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thanks for the tips guys. sounds like common sense to me. it had been raining all day, so all the oil and crap from other vehicles should have been washed off the road, thats why i didnt have any problem with going out when i did. I dont plan on intentionally going out and riding in the rain for fun, i just wanted to get a feel for it so if it were to start raining while i'm out i wouldnt freak.

oh, and i ordered my sliders yesterday :)
 

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sounds like common sense to me.
You'd be surprised how often the "common sense" stuff gets overlooked. Like guys buying liter bikes to learn on :D:twofinger

oh, and i ordered my sliders yesterday :)
Let's hope you never have to put them to use. I wish I had 'em when I wrecked my Gixxer. Luckily my swingarm spools and bar ends saved some of the hard parts, but didn't help my fairings at all :(
 

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since the spill, i've put on about 350 miles, so i'm definitely still on the horse :) It's been raining quite a bit the last couple weeks, so all the sand is getting washed away, but i'm still not trusting corners. i also took my first ride in the rain tonight. with the delightful 45*, i decided it would be a good time to teach myself to ride in the rain, being there wasnt any traffic out.

with riding in the rain, what needs to be done differently? i figured out to avoid puddles, and i'm assuming slow down even more than usual for corners. i'm also assuming that i should avoid the painted lines, i bet they can get slippery when wet?
Sounds good, Joe. Keep on it.

You've already got some high points on rain riding. During my roadrace school, the instructor (Aaron Stevenson of Cornerspeed) pointed out that rain riding/racing is all about smooth, and can help your dry riding. Be smooth.

Also, get rid of your aprehension of corners. Look as far into and through the corner as you can. It will help your smooth your inputs and keep your control of the machine.

You are keeping it real. Keep going.
 

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wow that sucks.. i really want to get a bike but i have never ridden one before. Kinda hesitant about it tell you the truth. Let me know if i can do anything for you about the plastics. I just got some plastics in from cali and it only cost 16 dollars for that guy to ship them DHL.. later nick www.bandndesigns.com
I know that feeling. When I took the MSF course, I was pretty nervous. At that time I haven't even had the experience of driving a stick, let alone working the clutch on a motorcycle. I had a good couple hours of time to stress over it on my drives there and back. Once I got on the bike though, WR200, I got used to it really quick. Just walking it with the clutch helped me get over the anxiety.

That said, don't stress over it. Those MSF courses are wonderful for getting people started and even letting people know what they've been doing wrong if they were riding for 15+ years. Find a class, sign up for it and afterward, see if it's what you like to do. Best 20-30 bucks you'll ever spend. :)
 
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