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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
i needed to start this cause i have a problem.
my bike has odd rims (back is bigger than front)
so i decided to ask you guys.
my rims are for 110/80-17 front and 130/70-18 or 140/70-18
rearwhat tires should i get?
im looking at Pirelli match, or Pirelli road winner rx-01
i've had metzler me 33 lazer (f) and me1 (r)
and think they dont grab enough in the front.
any help would be app. .
 

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It seems to me that it's not unsual to have a smaller rim in the front. Any bike that I can remember seeing is set up this way. Anyway about the tires I have the Dunlop D207's and they kick ass. Sorry I don't know anything about any of the other tires you are talking about.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
jase100 said:
It seems to me that it's not unsual to have a smaller rim in the front. Any bike that I can remember seeing is set up this way. Anyway about the tires I have the Dunlop D207's and they kick ass. Sorry I don't know anything about any of the other tires you are talking about.
the problem is finding tires that meet the sizes i have up top
and match.
 

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tires..

I don't know how you feel about Avon or Bridgestone, but they handle those sizes in a sport tire. The bridgestones are not too bad for grip, but i don't know anything about the Avon's.
 

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Its been wrecked and thrown together and then you bought it.:crying:
Correct tires/rims on that bike are
120/60- 17
160/60- 17
I've never heard of mix matched wheel sizes, but hey, what do I know.
 

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110/80-17
130/70-18
Damn I've never heard of that. Sportbikes wheels are the same size frt and rear. 207's are pretty good, but I only get about 4000 out of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Re: tires..

bionic man said:
I don't know how you feel about Avon or Bridgestone, but they handle those sizes in a sport tire. The bridgestones are not too bad for grip, but i don't know anything about the Avon's.
what type of bridgestones and avon? i could'nt find a match for my rear
 

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Discussion Starter #9
shannon said:
110/80-17
130/70-18
Damn I've never heard of that. Sportbikes wheels are the same size frt and rear. 207's are pretty good, but I only get about 4000 out of them.
what can you tell me for sizes? like i said before im thinking about pirelli
 

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With the Avon tires, you would have to mix between 2 different kinds, but Bridgestone battalax you can get in 110/80V17 and 140/80v18. You should be able to go up a size on the rear without any problems, but don't quote me on that. The only problem i found with the Bridgestones is that they stress crack early from heavy breaking. And i'm not sure, but i believe my old 86 FZ 750 came with non-matching rim sizes. Someone correct me if i'm wrong...it does happen from time to time.
 

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In the book i have, the only Pirelli that would fit your back rim is a sport touring tire which is ok if you don't mind sliding the ass end around on tight corners. Thats my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
bionic man said:
With the Avon tires, you would have to mix between 2 different kinds, but Bridgestone battalax you can get in 110/80V17 and 140/80v18. You should be able to go up a size on the rear without any problems, but don't quote me on that. The only problem i found with the Bridgestones is that they stress crack early from heavy breaking. And i'm not sure, but i believe my old 86 FZ 750 came with non-matching rim sizes. Someone correct me if i'm wrong...it does happen from time to time.
the biggest i can go in the rear is 140/70-18,the factory size is 130/70-18, with the 140/70-18 which is on now i have less than 1/2 inch between tire and chain.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
bionic man said:
In the book i have, the only Pirelli that would fit your back rim is a sport touring tire which is ok if you don't mind sliding the ass end around on tight corners. Thats my 2 cents.
i think im doomed to not getting radials or real sticky tires.
i've been told it's dangerous to mix tires.:)finger: wich sucks)
and how much slide are we talking? will the front stay planted?
will the bike decide to go for a ride without me as soon as hard parts and possibly knees touch ground?
is that the match sport touring tires or the road winner rx-01?
the match is "v" rated and the road winners are "h" rated.
 

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On sport touring tires, unless you're a huge fan and somewhat talented and enjoy the famous tire slid, by the time your knee touches the ground you'll either be hanging so far off your bike you might as well get off or you'll be filling your pants looking for some extra skid material. You can get a 110/80V17 and 130/80V18 in the Michelin Macadam 50. The pirelli's are the match sport touring bias ply. Sorry man, that's all the help i can give.
 

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Manufacturers have often used different diameters between front and rear. Remember the old Honda VF750, early FJ12s or even the early Blade, they had 16" front diameters. Having a smaller diameter front wheel diameter aids steering because a smaller front will produce less of a gyroscopic effect. Compare say a scooter to a sports bike and notice the difference in lightness/heaviness when steering. The smaller diameter could also be to reduce unsprung weight at the front, done because of the design of the forks. Who knows why the manufacturer makes the choice, but their is normally a good engineering reason for it.

With regard to mixing and matching tyres. The types of tyre that you shouldn't mix are radial v. cross ply because they have completely different side wall designs and a mix of these can cause handling problems, especially under extreme use (there are certain circumstances where they can be mixed but it definitely is NOT advised).

If your bike was design to be used with cross ply rather than radials, you should really stick to cross ply because of the different intrinsic characteristics of the tyres. Remember, the tyre is probably the most important part of your motorcycle. If your bike was not designed and manufactured for radials, if you fit them, the way in which a radial behaves compared to a cross ply will transfer forces through to your suspension and chassis differently, and this may cause you handling problems.

In additional, fitting wider tyres, such as a 140 compared to a 130 will also have effects such as slower steering, for example. If you fit a wider tyre to the same rim you may also change the cross - section of the tyre (unless that width of tyre was designed for that rim width, measured in inches). This, for example, could lead to instability in a straight line or less contact patch while leaned over (because you have bent the tyre round further).

Again, this depends entirely on the specific design of each tyre.

Regarding the stickiness of the tyres, modern rubber is so advanced nowadays that even the touring tyres give very good grip - often to the point of coping with maximum lean angles etc. although not as grippy as supersports tyres. Therefore even if you were using cross ply v. radials, you would get a decent level of grip (of course assuming the right road conditions and warm tyres etc.)

The "v" and "h" are to do with speed ratings and should be suitable to the speed and power capabilities of your bike - however, selecting a tyre with a too high speed rating is not good because the tyre won't be used at its optimum level - for example using a z rated (for speeds in excess of 150mph) tyre on a 400.

Because your tyres are so important, you should contact the manufacturers directly and get their advice as to whether you can fit radials, and what width of tyre should be fitted to the rim you have. You can, of course also contact the tyre manufacturers who will also have guidelines on exactly which tyres should be used.

Personally, I have found tyre manufacturers to be really helpful, the Michelin race department has always been great with any questions or advice I have asked for regarding their race tyres. Avon have also returned calls I have made to ask about compatibility of their tyres.

Just my 2c worth.....

HTH
Simon
 

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Check out the new Dunlop GT-501. They replaced the K591 tire which were designed for your style of bike. I've used the K591 for years and was forced to switch to the GT-501 and I must say they are a sweet setup. My 1100 is stable as ever on them, even at steep angles. Best of all, you can get them for under $100 if you find the right online store.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
phalanx said:
Check out the new Dunlop GT-501. They replaced the K591 tire which were designed for your style of bike. I've used the K591 for years and was forced to switch to the GT-501 and I must say they are a sweet setup. My 1100 is stable as ever on them, even at steep angles. Best of all, you can get them for under $100 if you find the right online store.
i had k591's on my 86 radian( you can tell i like standards)
they were pretty good then i went to metzler which do not impress me . i'm not sure about the back mine is suposed to be a
130/70-18 will a 130/80-18 work with it? i mean cosidering i have a 140/70-18 on now but hate it.
 

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shannon said:
110/80-17
130/70-18
Damn I've never heard of that. Sportbikes wheels are the same size frt and rear. 207's are pretty good, but I only get about 4000 out of them.
I guess you never heard of a CBR900? Probably not. They aren't very well known.
 
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