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Ok guys, the factory tire pressure for my '98 Kat 600, was 33 front and 36 back. I have changed to Dunlop 207's and the dealer put in 32psi front and back. What is everyone running for tire pressure? Do you lower the pressure for racing?


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Thomas
'98 Katana 600
 

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I run:

Track: 28front 29rear

Street: 32front 34rear.

Dunlop207GP's.

But keep in mind this is for a 98ZX9R. Each bike and rider has a different preference, kind of like suspension settings.

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Robert Basil
It ain't easy being green - Kermit the frog
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[This message has been edited by Sportbikeworld (edited October 20, 2000).]
 

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Right now, I am running Pilot Sports, and haven't quite got the right pressures for the right situations dialed in. i have been using basically the same pressures as I used on my Battlax BT-010s, but the Pilots seem to be squirmy in corners at, or near, the limits of traciton. I don't know if this will go away once I get the pressures right, or if the tires will be worn out by the time I get the pressures right. Anyway, what I found worked very well for the BT-010s was:

Street (warm temperatures- summer) 35/40

Street (spring /fall) 34/38

Long trips/rain 36/42 (maximum recommended pressure)

Track (all temperatures) 33/36



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I run 32 front, 36 rear. I run the same pressures on both the GSX-R with D207's, and the Triumph with BT-56SS's. I find that they work quite well.
 

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I believe the rule of thumb is to stick with the Bikes Mfg. recommendations to start, then adjust for personal pref.
 

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fzr400--bt56ss, track only--

29.0 front
29.0 rear

cold

28.5 front
27.5 rear

gsxr750 d207 street

33 front
34 rear

all weather.

tires wear out quicker with lower pressures, plus they move on the sidewall and if you're not used to running lower pressures, it'll feel like the rear is moving around. if you're used to tires moving around a bit, you won't notice it at all.

lower pressures do put more tire on the pavement, therefore more traction.
 

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Try a few pressures and see, you'll notice alot of difference in the way the bike turns. I don't like low pressures for street riding, it makes the bike feel sloppy, and like it has a suspension setup problem.
Like HondaNut said. Go to recommended first and play from there.
 

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Determining Best Tire Pressures

Determining Best Tire Pressures

You'll get a lot of opinions on what tire pressure to run, but the correct tire pressure for you is not a matter of polling other rider's opinion. Here are the basics you'll need to decide for yourself.

Start with the bike manufacturer's recommendation in the owners manual or under-seat sticker. This is the number they consider to be the best balance between handling, grip and tire wear. Further, if you're running alloy wheels on poor pavement, consider adding 2 psi to the recommended tire pressure just to reduce the likelihood of pothole damage. Just as you would for a car, increase the pressure 2 psi or so for sustained high speed operation (or 2-up riding) to reduce rolling friction and casing flexing. Check your tire pressure regularly as they say.

In order to get optimum handling a tire has to get to its optimum temperature which is different for each brand of tire. Most of us don't have the equipment needed to measure tire temperature directly so we measure it indirectly by checking tire pressure since tire pressure increases with tire temperature. Tire temperature is important to know because too much flexing of the casing of an under-inflated tire for a given riding style and road will result in overheating resulting in less than optimum grip. Over-pressurizing a tire will reduce casing flexing and prevent the tire from getting up to the optimum operating temperature and performance again suffers. Sliding and spinning the tires also increase tire temperatures from friction heating.

A technique for those wanting to get the most out of their tires on the street is to use the 10/20% rule.

First check the tire pressure when the tire is cold. Then take a ride on your favorite twisty piece of road. Then, measure the tire pressure immediately after stopping. If the pressure has risen less than 10% on the front or 20% on the rear, the rider should remove air from the tire. So for example, starting at a front tire pressure of 32.5 psi should bring you up to 36 psi hot. Once you obtain this pressure increase for a given rider, bike, tire, road and road temperature combination, check the tire pressure again while cold and record it for future reference.

Each manufacturer is different. Each tire model is different. A tire design that runs cooler needs to run a lower pressure (2-3 psi front) to get up to optimum temperature. The rear tire runs hotter than the front tire, road and track. So the rear tire cold-to-hot increase is greater. Dropping air pressure has the additional side effect of scrubbing more rubber area.

When I used the tire pressures recommended by Ducati (32.5F/36R) for my 916 on my favorite road, I got exactly 10/20% on a set of Bridgestone BT-012SS. So I guess I'm an average rider and the BT-012SS runs at an average operating temperature compared to other brands.

For the track you'll have to drop the cold tire pressures an additional 10/20%. Track operation will get tires hotter (increasing the cold-to-hot pressure range) so starting at say 32/30 psi now should bring you up to the same temperature (and pressure) that 35/39 psi gave you for the street. Don't even think about running these low track cold pressures on the street.

Finally, dropping tire pressures on street tires for track use has its limitations, so street compound tires on the track often get too hot and go beyond sticky to greasy. That's why you have race tires. Race tire compounds are designed for severe operation at these higher temperatures for a limited number of thermal cycles. On the other hand, race tire on the street usually won't get up to the appropriate temperature for good performance. At street speeds, the race compound often won't perform as well as a street tire.
 
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