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Discussion Starter #1
in a car i know that you change the oil and get the whole LOF every 3000 miles and you get new tires about every 40000 miles. you get like scheduled 60, 75 and 90k maintainance and stuff. but it's pretty easy. not much money to spend. you just drive and don't really worry about replacing or maintaining stuff for a long time.
my worry is this, i get a cheap ass buell blast and barely afford even those cheap payments. however, will i be able to keep it running and maintained??!
help me out guys, i'm new to the sport.
-gabe
 

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maintenance

Depending on how much you ride . . . change the oil and filter at least once a year and lube the chain every 500 miles or so. That's only about $30 a year in maintenance.

It's a Harley, after all.
 

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You should change the oil and filter at least every 3000 miles and you can easily do it yourself. You will go through a rear tire about every 5000 miles or so on a Blast and 10k maybe on the front (guessing, could vary greatly). Other than that, a can of chain lube will cost you maybe $10 and last a year as it should be done every 500 miles or when you get the chain wet. As long as you do your T-CLOC (Tires, cables, lights, oil, chain) inspection regularly you should be ok. Go over the bike checking for loose nuts and bolts often too.
 

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Buel Blast

Dude, you can do way better then a buel blast. Its probably the ugliest motorcycle on the road (besides every harley ever made). If your gonna get a bike, you might as well get something you'll like in 6 months. Get yourself a used CBR or an SV650 or something. You might get away cheaper that route also. Then you can afford to not just own the bike, but also ride it. Tires, chains, crash repairs (face it, you'll go down eventually, we all do) add up to a lot more then you originally anticipated. Good luck, and keep it rubber side down.
 

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Better choices than those CBRs or SV650 would be a GS500 or EX500 (ninja) They would be cheaper than a new blast, and don't have the plastic that the previously mentioned bikes do. Also, they don't have the power that the cbr and SV does. It IS best to start on something youll be bored of in 6 months. Besides, just because Kevlar7 says everyone wrecks just proves he can't ride! HAHA just kidding buddy. We have all seen you on your bmx.
 

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Can't ride huh?? We'll see about that next weekend. Ohhhh is it a little too cold for you shane?? awww, poor baby!!!

LOL

Sure, an ex500 or gs500 would be a better beginner bike then the ones I listed. I don't disagree at all. And just about everyone crashes eventually. Most people in their first year of riding. You should never get on a bike unless you can accept the fact that you will likely crash someday.

Just my opinion. :D

P.S. Shane, where ya been lately? Haven't seen ya at mill.
 

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you might as well figure 3 good wrecks in the first couple of years of riding(that is if your pushing it). all you can really do is learn from your mistakes that way you don't repeat them(dont plug a tire:D :D :D )
 

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HondaNut! said:
You should change the oil and filter at least every 3000 miles...a can of chain lube will cost you maybe $10 and last a year as it should be done every 500 miles or when you get the chain wet.
IMHO, 3,000 mile oil changes is 'old school' (after break-in). Sure you may have used to do so, but oil has come a long way over the years. If we're still clinging to old school rules...well, anybody makin' a profit selling you oil ain't gonna inform you otherwise.
I run Mobil 1 in all vehicles (been doing so since '76), and on my Concours, I change every 5,000 miles if I feel like it. If not, I catch it at 10,000. When Mobil 1 came out, they had '25,000 miles between oil changes' stamped on the bottle front. From what I understand, they dropped this claim to avoid any problems with OEM folks and their recommended oil change intervals. I figure if it's good enough for Mobil to originally claim 25,000 miles between changes, it ought to handle 10,000 on a bike with no problems. BTW, I'm too cheap to pay $8/quart for the 'motorcycle specific' Mobil 1. If you're worried about additives removed with the new energy conserving oils, run 15W-50 Mobil 1 (my last was $17.95/5 quart jug at WalMart).
Besides...by not chaging oil more often than necessary, you:
1. Save money/time/aggravation
2. Help the environment
3. Don't pad the pockets of oil companies/middle eastern countries!

As far as chain lube, if you have a good X/O-ring chain, I'm thinking 300 to 500 mile lubes may be old school also. I remember reading an article in one of the motomags years ago (not long after O-ring chains became popular on street bikes) where the author quizzed a rep for a major chain manufacturer about chain lube. He wondered if the big selling point for X/O ring chains was the lube was already in the chain (sealed behind the O-rings), why are folks still being told to lube 'em? Are you really gonna get anything past the O-rings to the vital lube points? (been wondering 'bout this myself). The rep finally told him all you really need to lube a chain for is to prevent rust (said you could hit it with something like WD-40, if I recall).
YMMV, but unless my chain gets wet, I don't worry 'bout lubing it too much. Only have 4,500 miles on the 6R (first chain bike I've had in a while), but on my old '85 600 Ninja, I replaced the chain at 25,000 miles as preventive maintenance. The mechainic told me it looked like it could go another 25,000. If so, I won't be replacing the one on my 6R as quickly.

Since you're on a tight budget, mebbe this will give you a few things to think about while looking for ways to save money!
 

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Get what you want too

Grub Get what ever bike YOU want ,dont get what others would have you get. If you like the Blast and can afford it and if thats the bike that floats your boat then go for it. Most new bikes are simple to maintain, any one with a shop manual, and owners manual should easly be able to acomplish it with out to much of a $$$ strain. Oh yea one more thing Buells have belts not chains no maintence required. The more work you do on the bike yourself the cheeper it is to matain and the better you know YOUR bike and that should make you both happy.
 

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I might agree about oil change intervals with synthetics, but when I changed my oil (Motul 5100) last week at 2800 miles, the oil was BLACK. I agree that the oil may still have its integrity, but I also believe that the oil gets poluted and should therefore be changed more often... especially with a wet clutch.

As far as the chain, there is alot of opinions on how often they should be cleaned and lubed, but its a very quick and easy thing to do and Ill just play it safe thanks very much. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
yo guys, thanx a million. that was very informative. i never really figured that a ex-500 kawasaki would be a good starting bike. i think those buells look SICK though. REALly good looks. but i think i would look retardo sitting on a tiny bike like that. anyways, since it IS an american bike and i am american, i'm giving buell the benefit of the doubt and i'm gonna go down and check them out.
as far as the oil changing shannangins, i have this to say: if you change your oil every 1 thousand miles it would be best. you could change your oil every 1 mile and it would run forever in a car. 3000 miles or 3 months sounds fine to me.
thanx for the info and i'll see you fellas later on the road (hopefully!)
-g
 

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HondaNut! said:
I might agree about oil change intervals with synthetics, but when I changed my oil (Motul 5100) last week at 2800 miles, the oil was BLACK.
True or not, I've heard some companies design their oil to turn black after use (a couple of heat cycles?) in order to make it more difficult for unscrupulous folks to repackage used oil and sell it as new.
If the color bothers you, maybe ya oughta try another oil?

As far as the chain, there is alot of opinions on how often they should be cleaned and lubed, but its a very quick and easy thing to do and Ill just play it safe thanks very much.

Think I'll just go with the chain company's rep, 'specially since I'd already come to the same conclusion as his recommendation (when he was cornered). I'd be careful exactly how I cleaned the chain, since some solvents could attack the O-rings. If so, there goes your internal chain lube...

Anywho...I never professed to be young enough to know it all... :eek:
 

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Don't let the blackness of oil fool you, it's black almost immediately after you change it. I have a oil level sight glass and less than 200 miles after an oil change with mobil 1 motorcycle oil it's black as the stuff I took out. I've had car shops try to sell diff oil changes and other stuff based on color and it's usually a sham. Follow the manufactureres guide for oil changes and you'll be fine.
 

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Motorcycle Maintanence

basicblur said:


IMHO, 3,000 mile oil changes is 'old school' (after break-in). Sure you may have used to do so, but oil has come a long way over the years. If we're still clinging to old school rules...well, anybody makin' a profit selling you oil ain't gonna inform you otherwise.
I run Mobil 1 in all vehicles (been doing so since '76), and on my Concours, I change every 5,000 miles if I feel like it. If not, I catch it at 10,000. When Mobil 1 came out, they had '25,000 miles between oil changes' stamped on the bottle front. From what I understand, they dropped this claim to avoid any problems with OEM folks and their recommended oil change intervals. I figure if it's good enough for Mobil to originally claim 25,000 miles between changes, it ought to handle 10,000 on a bike with no problems. BTW, I'm too cheap to pay $8/quart for the 'motorcycle specific' Mobil 1. If you're worried about additives removed with the new energy conserving oils, run 15W-50 Mobil 1 (my last was $17.95/5 quart jug at WalMart).
Besides...by not chaging oil more often than necessary, you:
Ok, I'll agree with you on the point of 'cycle specific oils (although I run silkoline), yes there is no difference between most "car" and "motorcycle" oils. But as far as the change interval goes.. I have to stick with every 3k, 5K at the max. As I have said in previous posts, I have worked in several dealerships as a parts man, and a Tuner as well. I have torn many a bike motor apart and had a good look at its insides, and am intimately familiar with the theory of how oil works (hydrodynamic wedge, etc, etc.) Whilst 25,000 miles is fine for a car, it is not good for a motorcycle, and the reasons for this are many. I'll touch on some of the differences between oiling a car motor and a bike motor.
A car motor is usually a big chunk of metal, spinning at up to 10,000 RPM maximum. Your average inline four in today’s bike is capable of hitting 16,000 rpm redline, and thus stresses its oil much harder. Most automobile engines also are built with less ring tension (the outward force that holds the ring against the bore forming a seal) because the pistons (and therefore rings) are larger providing more ring diameter to apply outward pressure against. Due to the smaller diameter and higher RPM of the average bike motor the ring tension has to be significantly higher to maintain a compressible seal. This causes slightly accelerated wear in the ring/bore mating surfaces, but is offset by harder ring/bore materials in motorcycle design. The same holds true with most load bearing surfaces in a motorcycle engine (main bearings, pins, cam bearings, etc..) They are significantly smaller then their car counterparts, and thus carry much more load in a higher tolerance area, and oil has to protect all those parts moving against each other at that load.
Motorcycles also have a limited space and frontal area in which to design and place a cooling system. In a motorcycle engine, the oil handles much more of the cooling duties than in a typical car. Oil in a bike motor must endure more heat than in a car, and heat is what causes oil to break down and become less efficient.
In addition to all this, the average car has a totally sealed and separate transmission and clutch assembly, where a bike does not. Engine oil is used to bathe the clutch in a wet clutch assembly (found on just about any non racing bike made in the last two decades). Clutches are high wear items, with up to seven or more plates spinning and grinding against each other. All that debris ends up in the oil, again causing it to be less efficent.
All in all, I am just illutstrating why oil in a motorcycle is stressed higher than in a car. But in the end, it comes down to peace of mind for me. When I bounce the tach off redline on my R1, I know that I have the best possible protection in there, and my oil is going to be able to protect all those parts moving at maximum velocity. Sorry to be so long, just passin some knowledge..

Keep it safe, Rubber side down..
 
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