Sportbike World banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, I did a real boneheaded thing today that could have gotten me killed. I was riding home from work on my usual route when I came up on a slower moving truck. The road is out through the country with little traffic and I was running about 70. I came up behind the truck, slowed slightly until I got past a side road and the passing zone opened up, then I went to pass. I hit my signal, glanced in the mirror and moved over all in about the same motion. Unfortunately, a car had come up behind me that I totally missed seeing. I guess he decided to pass both me and the truck before I made my move. I saw it just as the front fender came abreast of me when I was moving into the other lane. For a second or two I was trapped between the two vehicles. Fortunately, I nailed the throttle and squirted out ahead. It was dumb luck that I saw the car when I did. Had he been a little farther up, I could have easily run right into the side of him. What did I learn? PAY ATTENTION!! I run that road so often I failed to keep a good enough watch behind me. Riding is no place for daydreaming. Be vigilant people, I very nearly payed a big price for inattention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Good suggestion!!! That is one of the things I learned early on...don't be complacent, and monotny will kill you!!! If this is a road you take to or from work everyday...find another route and take that every once in a while...just so you don't become complacent!!! Glad you were ok enough to get out of there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,362 Posts
Most accidents happen close to home!

Glad you are O.K. Getting into a rut is a sure way to get hurt on a motorcycle. The highway traffic safety commission states that the majority of accidents happen very close to home because people start taking things for granted in familiar territory. Ride safe and I am glad you didn't have to pay a lot for that riding lesson.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
SHOULER CHECK ---- SHOULDER CHECK

Do NOT count on your mirrors ONLY for there are blind spots from cages & blind sports while riding m/cs. You simply forgot to do a sensible 'shoulder check'. Come to think of it ------ is this not taught when one takes an MSF course or how di you obtain you m/c license?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Re: SHOULER CHECK ---- SHOULDER CHECK

Smitty said:
Do NOT count on your mirrors ONLY for there are blind spots from cages & blind sports while riding m/cs. You simply forgot to do a sensible 'shoulder check'. Come to think of it ------ is this not taught when one takes an MSF course or how di you obtain you m/c license?
You are correct. I was taught better and I know better. I feel I made two mistakes. One was not keeping track of what was behind me and the other was not doing the shoulder check. Its strange too, I'm usually very anal about keeping track of things behind me. You can bet I'll be more alert now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
My visor opens when I do this???

I have a somewhat related question here... I do my shoulder checks when changing lanes, but my helmet visor cracks open above 30 mph (Approx. speed.) It is quite annoying and I was wondering if this is normal. I looked over the helmet and don't see anything I should be tightening. Its the HJC SL-III or something like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
No there is something wrong with your helmet --

---& the visor lock-up.
I have been wearing Shoei for past 15 or more yrs & never had a visor open up even at high speeds when doing sensible shoulder checks. Admittely the lst few Shoei helmets one had to lock down the visor, but not so for some 10 plus yrs or more as they corrected that error.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
It's quiet and comfortable, and a great deal for the price, but the visor opening phenomenon is just too annoying to warrant ever buying another. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Re: My visor opens when I do this???

YZF600R Guy said:
I have a somewhat related question here... I do my shoulder checks when changing lanes, but my helmet visor cracks open above 30 mph (Approx. speed.) It is quite annoying and I was wondering if this is normal. I looked over the helmet and don't see anything I should be tightening. Its the HJC SL-III or something like that.
Someone else on here started a similar thread... I've got an HJC CL-12, so I know one problem that can cause this. Take the visor off and put it back together again, and make sure that everything is on properly and there are no gaps at the edges of the visor. If you don't get all the little tabs tucked in properly, the visor will open and close smoothly instead of ratcheting like it's supposed to. If they're all in place, it should stay shut.

Cyrus
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
It could be the problem of a poorly designed helmet.

Yet it could be simple wear & tear. After all there are plastic gears & one can hear them as they move the visor up or down the clicks.
These can wear out & in some cases the replacement gears are not much better then the woren out ones.
So aim at helmets that have a repuration of being trouble free. It might be 25% more, but the visor ripping open once one does a should check is shocking & might tend to have one NOT making the proper shoulder check & SUDDENLY you & the bike are splattered all over the pavement --- all for trying to save a few dollars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I have an HJC CL-12 also. It did flip open after I changed the shield a few times. I took it apart as mentioned by chmccand and found that one of the tabs was not under the keeper like it should be. No more problems now. P.S. the first time that happened I about messed up my seat:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Change your movement!

Most of us hold our heads erect and turn our heads directly to the left when doing a shoulder check prior to changing lanes or passing. This puts your head, helmet and visor at an angle which is prone to catch the wind and raise the visor. A minor variation to your neck movement can change the angle at which the wind hits the visor thus preventing the dreaded 'visor lift'. Try this. Tip your head forward a bit before looking left. This points the top of your head to the front and will keep the wind from ripping open your visor. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
Green0: That is a good one.

I have been doing this ever since I started to use full face helmets for some of the older & not as well made helmets had the visor ripping open AND that was the only way I could partially prevent it. So the HABIT has carried on to this day AND I never thought of it till your Post.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top