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so I'm riding home on I-5 last night and as I ready myself to go 710 northbound, i drop down a gear and my clutch lever suddenly has too much slack. First thing I thought was that it doesn't work, but managed to shift gears as long as i pulled it all the way in. My next thought was that the screw that held the clutch cable came loose so that's why I'm having so much slack and crappy response. finally made it back home w/ no other incident, put her in the garage where I had some light to check out the problem: the screw that held the clutch lever to the clip-on must have come off while I was riding :eek:

has this, or any other similar incident, occured to anyone else? I feel pretty sheepish and retarded thinking about it, but hey, at least the lever didn't fly off along w/ that bolt :D
 

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Damn.. you're lucky.

I usually go around and check various screws and bolts whenever I'm doing maintenance to some part of my bike, and so far I haven't had anything like that happen.
 

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Yeah. I had the screw come out of the brake lever. Since there is no cable it just fell off. Imagine my suprise when I reach for the lever and there isnt one...
 

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That has never happened to me. I had a similar instance with my gear shift lever. The carraige bolt that holds the lever to the linkage rattled out...went to down shift and nothing. I had to clutch it to a roll then stop at a gas station. Rode first geart the rest of the way home.

Nah, don't worry about it happening. Shit like that does. Unas is right though, go around and tighten everything while giving it a once over inspection. I have gone as far as adding blue loctite to bolts that are likely to come off.:2cents:
 

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Does blue locktite work better than red under some loads? I used to add red locktite to fairing bolts, and they still rattled out. Should I try blue?
 

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Vash said:
Does blue locktite work better than red under some loads? I used to add red locktite to fairing bolts, and they still rattled out. Should I try blue?
I have always used blue and it works fine for me. I think red is more permanent then blue. I'm surprised that red rattled out, that shit is gummy when you try to unscrew a bolt with it on.
 

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red loctite is stronger. They make hundreds of different kinds depending on the application. Make sure the threads are covered and that they are allowed to dry completely. Also, if this is a high heat area, typical red(271) and blue(242) will melt. Loctite isn't a super glue, it just dries in between the valleys of the nut and bolt causing a wedge between th two. If that makes sense.
 

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wedge? can you go over that in more detail?

Also what do you mean allowed to dry completely? Prior to assembly?
 

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Wedge - When the loctite dries it causes a wedge in the valleys between the nut and the bolt. So when the nut tries to back out through vibration it can't. Like chaulking a car tire before you jack it up. The tire doesn't move because of the chaulk.

Dry completely - after assembly, apply proper torque and then wait at least 30 minutes, sometimes longer depending on the type of Loctite. You Have to let it dry before load is applied to it.

Let me know if this make sense. It's easier to say in person.
 

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Still lost on the wedge concept. Never chalked a car tyre either...

I was under the impression that locktite was essentially glue. It forms a layer in between the nut and the bolt (not on the loading surfaces, but around) that has very hight surface area, so the friction is holding the pieces in place.
 

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Yeah it's like that, imagine two gears with teeth touching and you placed a rod between them. Try to add motion to them and they won't move. That's loctite. It's not a glue that bonds though. It just hardens and causes a wedge. That's why they make all kinds, depending on bolt diameters, strengths, heat or friction. So you don't have underkill(?) or overkill.

And I can't believe that you never had to change a car tire. Even if you don't own one, what about your parents, girlfriends, wife, friends, driver's e.d., Aunt Sue, seen it on T.V., drove by someone on the highway, etc. For safety's sake you always wedge a tire so the car won't shift.

Maybe it's just me, but I'm into safety. Seen too many accidents in my short occupation of this planet.
 

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Yeah, I changed plenty of tires. Just never heard of "Chalking" the tires. I thought it had something to do with verifying toe-in on a car. Or something like that. Hey here is another good squid statement
"New adjustable camber plates now available for the K5".

I'm afraid the wedge concept is lost on me without pictures. a thread is essentially a linear guide, that is formed in the shape of a helix. I just dont see anywhere to insert the wedge.
Unless of course you are talking about the microscopic peaks in valleys in the metal, not the valleys of the thread...
 

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Vash said:
Yeah, I changed plenty of tires. Just never heard of "Chalking" the tires...

...I'm afraid the wedge concept is lost on me without pictures...
I think Jus_Livin' means "chock", not "chalk", as in a wheel chock.

WRT to the Loctite, when a male and female thread are mated, there will always be spaces within that coupling that are not "metal on metal". It's these spaces that the Loctite occupies, preventing the threads from winding apart without a force greater than vibration.
 

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I guess your thinking too hard or I'm not thinking hard enough. I attached a .pdf file I hope it works. You can see the screw inside the threaded block. In between the two, is Loctite. when it hardens, it becomes a wedge between the screw and the block. * If you have a bolt and a nut. You thread the nut the bolt but not tight, it will wiggle. If you put Loctite in the gap(wiggle), apply the appropriate torque. The Loctite fills the small variances between the two and becomes a wedge.
 

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sorry I didnt know it was going to load the whole thing. Look at page 6.

Thanks, cookee for the further explanation. I can see it I just can't describe it well to people.
 

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Lost Nomad said:

has this, or any other similar incident, occured to anyone else?
Happened to me. I zip tied it until Honda could order me another one. I rode from Pittsburgh to D.C. and back with it zip tied. Worked like a charm.
 

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I think we are in total agreement as to how it works, I just dont see why you are calling it a wedge. To me a wedge implies something triangular.

But I'm not out to argue semantics
 

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Its a slice. and if you dont like it, you can fight duessel.
 
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