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Discussion Starter #1
saturday i went down again.....what happened was that i was doing around 30mph then i hit the front brakes a little too hard...locked them up and before i could release the brakes to stop them from locking up my handle bars shook like crazy and next thing i know im rolling and the bike is sliding.

slight cosmetic damage on the bike and me....any way would buying a steerign stabilizer since my bike didnt come with one be a swell idea and prevent future accidents?
 

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This could have been avoided..as I'm sure you know...newer riders need to Practice, practice, and practice some more...doing panic type stops...this is so that you'll know what happens when the need arises...Audio, I'm guessing that you prolly made 2 mistakes...1 locking the frt brake, and 2..I'll bet ya put a "death grip" on the bars..and maybe the road had some bumps in it...whic would have compinded the problem...

Best thing to do when you encounter a tank slapper/head shake is to loosen your grip on the bars as much as possble, let the bike do what it was designed to do...99.99% of the time, it will right it self..So yes..you could install a steering damper, but in most cases, except for some Yam. R1's...you really don't need one..

As for the types of dampers...there the Scott's, Olin's, GPR, HyperPro..ect...
 

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Panic Stops, and how to Practice them...

Find a deserted road, that's smooth...start by only using the Front brake...get up to 10 mph, and apply the brake to the point just before locking it up, do this several times, to where you can get the rear wheel to just come off the ground, and feel in control...Then increase the speed by 5 or 10 mph, and repeat, until you can feel comfortable doing this at about 60 mph...

Once you feel o.k. with that, then do the same thing, but use the rear brake, but use it Lightly..the rear will help you stop better by about 20%...

It's best to have a friend along while practicing, just in case...:D

Also, Id recomend practicing some Evasive manuvers, by placing objects, such as pieces of 2X4X4 in a deserted road or BIG parking lot..that's void of paint lines...and practice steering around them...increasing the speed as needed. if you do this say once a month..during the riding season..you should be much better equiped to deal with cagers, ect...on the road..more importanly, you'll know what to expect, IF you have to do any of these manuvers...could save your life..

Ride Safe..
:D :D
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hammer 4 said:
This could have been avoided..as I'm sure you know...newer riders need to Practice, practice, and practice some more...doing panic type stops...this is so that you'll know what happens when the need arises...Audio, I'm guessing that you prolly made 2 mistakes...1 locking the frt brake, and 2..I'll bet ya put a "death grip" on the bars..and maybe the road had some bumps in it...whic would have compinded the problem...

Best thing to do when you encounter a tank slapper/head shake is to loosen your grip on the bars as much as possble, let the bike do what it was designed to do...99.99% of the time, it will right it self..So yes..you could install a steering damper, but in most cases, except for some Yam. R1's...you really don't need one..

As for the types of dampers...there the Scott's, Olin's, GPR, HyperPro..ect...
most definately i will blame myself for lack of experience....and i most likely had the bars on a death grip.....thanks for the input
 

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Audio, I hope you didn't take my post as critisium...but rather, friendly advice....And, not to toss out any bad JUJU, but I sincerly hope this is the Last time this happens..

Glad your o.k.....:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hammer 4 said:
Audio, I hope you didn't take my post as critisium...but rather, friendly advice....And, not to toss out any bad JUJU, but I sincerly hope this is the Last time this happens..

Glad your o.k.....:thumb:
not as ciriticism at all.... i appreciate the help and advice....i also apreciate your concern for my well being....i hope thats the last time i crash also ;)
thanks
 

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Hammer is so right about needing a lot of practice which means EXPERIENCE which I am sorry to say that comes through continual practicing & riding.

A steering head damper (you call it a stabalizer) would be totally usless in your situation.

About the only time a Honda 600 or Yamaha 600 might need the steering head damper would be when the very latest like the CBR600RR or R6 were tuned to the maximium, with best of suspension set-ups & the racer using the bike(s) was pushing them to 110% of the bikes & riders ability with the intent to win.

Not a CBR F3 like yours or 600r like mine I am sorry to say. There is one on my '00 Honda 929 for it is a tough gal to handle & one never knows when the f/wheel is lightened during accelleration or cranking it on hard & shifting through the cogs. That bike is very fussy that way & why so many 929 & 954s have them on along with the latest 1000 with a special factory one.
 

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I haven't been on this site for a while, so if you have addressed this in another post I apologize. Have you taken the MFS course? The instructors will work with you on hard braking in a controlled environment. They also provide many invaluable tips for new riders such as accident avoidance, setting up a turn correctly (to avoid panic braking), and counter-steering. If you haven't taken the course I highly recommend it - many states provide insurance discounts for MFS attendees as well.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Bonk! said:
I haven't been on this site for a while, so if you have addressed this in another post I apologize. Have you taken the MFS course? The instructors will work with you on hard braking in a controlled environment. They also provide many invaluable tips for new riders such as accident avoidance, setting up a turn correctly (to avoid panic braking), and counter-steering. If you haven't taken the course I highly recommend it - many states provide insurance discounts for MFS attendees as well.

Good luck.
the classes are so booked around here that im in the waiting list....but prior to that i talked with many seasoned riders for tips and stuff so i can ride my bike carefully before i go to the class
 

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life savers

I might ride a little more agreessive, after years of racing and riding street but, i got slap and head shake many times before i decided all might bikes would have dampeners. Agood qoute i once heard is (one day a dampener will save youre a$$) and they defineitly have. they dont weigh anything and are fairly enexpensive. Get 1!!! Good luck :2cents:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
thanks for the advice all of ya'll.....i think my best bet would be to practice hard braking at my old high school....they have 1/4 miles of newly paved asphalt with noone in sight of there i think that might help me out
 

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Couple of other random thoughts.....you might try to hook up with an experienced rider in your area (all the riders I know would be happy to help a someone like you out). Explain what your issues are and see if he/she will take you to his favorite road (we all have them!!). Follow his line and this will give you some things to work on like, (1) setting up a turn before you hit it (2) road awareness (an experienced rider will see things out of the corner of his/her eye that you probably would look past - if he is an experienced group rider he will point them out to you before you reach them), (3) trusting your bike (I had a '98 F3 and it is an extremely capable ride), (4) being relaxed and smooth. Also, try to resist the temptation to ride with "squids" who, unlike you, aren't as interested in improving their skill as they are showing off. I once saw a guy on a Goldwing slam the door on an R1 in a sweeping turn - it was like art in motion. :)

Anyway, stick with it - sounds like you're on the right track (we still have snow on the ground up here!)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks bonk.....i know a couple of people who would probally be able to help me out in that way.....wow last time it snowed here was in 89 i beleive by next month the temps should start to get into the 70's consistantly....and the headshake problem i think has a tiny bit to do with the crappy roads down here....on some roads no headshake at all and some othe ones at the same speed head shake....i think it has to di with the deal that there is no bed rock and i live in a delta region is why teh ground settles so much
 

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I totally areed with Bonk....:thumb:

Also...as a newer rider....or anyone for that matter.....when in doubt...slow down...it's far better to go to slow, then too fast, and possibly have a mishap...;)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hammer 4 said:
I totally areed with Bonk....:thumb:

Also...as a newer rider....or anyone for that matter.....when in doubt...slow down...it's far better to go to slow, then too fast, and possibly have a mishap...;)
thanks for all the info....i keep it at posted speed limits i guessi just need more time in the saddle and more training
 

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AudioSolstice said:
thanks for all the info....i keep it at posted speed limits i guessi just need more time in the saddle and more training
Audio...sometimes even the posted limit can be too fast..i.e. when there's debri or other slippery items on the road...also, when aproching a turn...slow down a wee bit more than you think you need to...as a safe guard...Speed limits are there for more of a guide...not nesessarly the actual speed that's safe...:D
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hammer 4 said:
Audio...sometimes even the posted limit can be too fast..i.e. when there's debri or other slippery items on the road...also, when aproching a turn...slow down a wee bit more than you think you need to...as a safe guard...Speed limits are there for more of a guide...not nesessarly the actual speed that's safe...:D
thanks im gonna take that into consideration.....i dont want to lay the bike down anymore...:)
 

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No, a steering damper would not remedy that situtation.

Tank slappers occur when oscillations are set up in the frame of the bike, usually starting at the rear wheel, transmitting through the frame to the fork, which absorbs the oscillatory energy and it happens usually when accellerating through a pavement irregularity or coming out of a turn. Like another person said, relax the grip on the bars (which is contrary to instinct during this crisis), and in addition, keep the throttle open and continue accellerating. If you are lucky (like I was once), you can ride through the slapper without crashing.

If you have low speed fork wobble or wobble when letting off the throttle, I would check your steering head bearing preload to make sure it is not loose.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
fuster said:

If you have low speed fork wobble or wobble when letting off the throttle, I would check your steering head bearing preload to make sure it is not loose.
hmmm...where do i find this guy at?
 
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