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Discussion Starter #1
Can ayone tell me what a good sprocket set-up would be for stunting my 01 gsxr 750. I was thinking of maybe a stock front sprocket and a 55 rear.
 

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what kind of stunting are we talking, occasional highway wheeeeeeeeeeelie, or are you looking to be a parking lot pimp. If you do most of your riding on the street and just want to roll a nice 2nd gear standup, i would go three or four up in the rear. If you want to get serious and work on slowing them down in first, go about 10 up in the rear. I dont ride a gix 750, so this is just a rough estimate, hopefully someone else that rides one will respond.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I can allready pull up some pretty nice second gear stand ups with the stock gearing but I wanted to be able to slow em down. I ordered my sprockets and another length of chain last night. I went -1 in the front and +9 in the rear. I went this route this way if I am going on a long trip I can just swap out the rear sprocket for my stock one. I am going to put in two connecting links in the chain this way I can shorten it for this reason. This bike will be a dual purpose type of machine for me. What are your thoughts on -1 and +9 in the rear? I think I should be able to slow the sheelies down for sure. I have a guy that lives by me that is a pro stunter. I am going to practice with the sprockets to see if I like them and if I do he's going to make me a bar. I am just looking to excite myself with something new. Riding on the street is getting boring for me.
 

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-1 +9 sounds good to me. Will definately allow you to slow em down as much as you like. Good Luck, and be prepared to take some time getting used to the change, it will be a little unforgiving, lots of pull/engine brake, so you gotta have throttle control on lock, but thats a great set up.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I ordered the sprockets from kneedraggers. I was thinking of calling them before it ships and getting a rear sprocket with a couple more teeth. I just want to make sure that -1 +9 is a good setup. I can't even imagine what the bike is going to feel like. I am so excited.
 

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Let me know how the change feels. I've been toying with the idea of going up a few teeth in the back but dont know if I'm ready or should do it yet.

Sepias
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How many teeth do you plan on going. I went more than a few. I can imagine -1 +9 is going to be a big change. I just hope I will be able to do some slow stunting. It is a new world for me. I can ride second gear stand ups on my bike for pretty much as long as I want to. I am just looking to be able to do some parking lot type stuff. I was doing a second gear stad up the other day at about 70MPH and reality set in and made me ask myself why the hell I was doing it. Why do that kind of thing when I can toy around in a lot. Chances of getting seriously injured in the lot are a lot less than falling on the street doing a 70mph whelie.
 

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I'm not thinking about changing to much. 1 in the front or 4 or 5 in the back, not both. The low end on my bike is pretty weak so I figured if I change the sprocket it would help by forcing me to a higher RPM sooner... errr something like that:D I dont want to change it to much since I use it as a daily rider and my MPG is bad enough.

Sepias
 

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Discussion Starter #10
mstrand_68 said:
Muhuhahaha. Wheelie steve spelled wheelie wrong.

:twofinger



-M-
LOL!

One down in the front would be fine for just street riding. I made a program in microsoft excel today to calculate how fast I would actually be going for a specific RPM in 6th gear. It's pretty cool, all you have to do is input some info about the tranny gear ratio's that can easily be found in a service manual and tire size along with the RPM and it will show how many MPH you are going at that RPM. I tried to attach it, but the site will not let me attach an excel file. If anyone wants to check it out just give me your email and I will send it.
 

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hey quick question on sprockets, whats the difference between steel and aluminum sprockets...steel seems to be cheaper...why?

and any1 used vortex brand sprockets? good? bad?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
alluminum is lighter but it wears out quicker. I have never tried vortex sprockets. The sprockets I just ordered are made by vortex. I figured I would try them out. I am a big fan of renthal sprockets.
 

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Steve: I just thought of this, would've been more help earlier. They make sprockets that are cut in half, allowing you to change them without taking off the rear wheel.

Meatshield: Aluminum sprockets are lighter. Wheels are the most important part of weight savings. Not only are you making the over all bike lighter, you are also making the remaining mass more centralized (helping control slides), reducing gyroscoping weight (making the bike easier to flick) and reducing unsprung mass (allowing your suspension to work better)
 

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ok...now i know all of what u said is true...but i never take my bike to the track and i'm not a world class rider so i've only scrapped my knee once in the year i've owned the bike...so that said would steel be the way to go? u know to get longer life outta the sprocket? or should i just stick with aluminum...cause i do like the twisties.

oh and going 1 down in the front(at 15) and just leaving the rear stock (at 46). will that be a noticable difference?
 

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It should be a noticable difference but not a drastic one. Going down 1 in the front, from what I've read, is the same as dropping 5 or 6 in the back. I would stick with steel if I were you. The weight savings shouldn't be more than 1/2 or 1 pound and probly not worth the price difference.

Sepias
 

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You should have about a 6% difference, which is noticable.
I'd stick with aluminum sprockets. A lighter unsprung mass is going to help you more on bumpy roads than it will on a smooth track.
I've also seen "Tri metal" sprockets. No idea on the price tag, but they have a large aluminum hub for less weight, and the teeth themselves are an insert of some harder metal for long wear. The best of both worlds, if the price is right.
 

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wheelie_steve said:
I tried to attach it, but the site will not let me attach an excel file. If anyone wants to check it out just give me your email and I will send it.
If you want to attach the file, just enable the extension in windows and change it to .gif upload it. Then once its on here we can DL it and change it back to .xls

Sepias
 

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Or you can post the formula. Goes something like this

(Fn/Rn)/(Fo/Ro)*Top speed.

Where
Fn= Number of teeth on the new front sprocket
Rn= Number of teeth on the new rear sprocket
Fo= Number of teeth on the old front sprocket
Ro= Number of teeth on the old rear sprocket

Its not perfect cause it doesnt take into account the speedometer error built into the bike.
 

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SepiasSoul said:
Going down 1 in the front, from what I've read, is the same as dropping 5 or 6 in the back.
Sepias
I think you mean going down one on the front is like going up 4-5ish (ratio driven calculation) on the back... right?
 
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