Sportbike World banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,644 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ferg,

if memory serves me correct, if you take off the tank and air box, you get lots of access.

it didn't take long. don't quote me on it working well, we weren't changing plugs, we were doing jet work.

------------------
Tony

the views and opinions expressed by tony (cbrf2boy) are the ramblings of a total idiot. sbw.com, it's administrators, moderators, and members don't necessarily agree with and are not responsible for anything this idiot has to say.

for more ramblings try http://geocities.com/cbrf2boy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I have purchased new plugs for my 99 R1. I figured that removing the side panels would give access to the cyclinder head for plug removal but I found little or no room to get anywhere near the plugs. Does anybody here have the experience of successfully changing the plugs on an R1 ?. Does it necessitate removing tank, airbox & filter etc to gain access ??.
Any help would be gratefully appreciated. Thanks

Ferg

------------------
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Hello,
On my R6 I had to remove the seat, gas tank and airbox. I did it alone. It's basic work but pay attention or better yet take notes. The tank comes off easily enough though there are hoses to remove. Prop the tank up, close the petcock and drain the fuel line into a small jar before removal. The clamps are releasable by hand. The air intakes and hoses are separated from the airbox next then the airbox itself.
There is a plastic sheild after that. The zip-tie type straps harnessing some wire and cable is easily opened by inserting a pointed tool into the head to release the ratchet and pulling the strap out.
The fastners that look like screws require a half turn only to allow removal. Hold the outer ring if the whole thing turns.
Cover the carbs.
Rotate the plug terminals back and forth as you pull them up.
My socket has a rubber insert too large in diameter to hold the plug so I used a piece of hose pressed down onto the plug to extract them. Mind the thread and torque when reinstalling.
Hope this is helpful.
jr

Speed Good; Speed Limit Bad.

[This message has been edited by Johnny Roadrash (edited July 30, 2000).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Guys
Thanks for your advice. Well, I removed the new steering damper I had just recently fitted, then the tank, then the airbox and then theres a plastic flap that holds both ignition coils underneath that. This is easily moved out of the way by rmoving 2 little plastic retaining clips, revealing a rubber mat with 4 round holes in it, through which the HT leads pass (these are thoughtfully numbered 1 through 4 which means I could pull them all out of the way before removing the plugs). Anyway, using the plug tool supplied in the Yamaha toolkit, the plugs were removed and changed without too much difficulty. If you have big hands it can be a little awkward though. I don't know how I would have managed without the proper plug spanner...probably would be a main delaer job without it.
To cut a long story short, I put it all back together and she started first thumb of the starter motor. The whole job took the bones of an hour to complete. If thats all it takes every 6000 miles or so then I'm not complaining.

------------------
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Thanks I-B for posting back after you did the job, I'll use your notes when it's time to do my own.

Cheers

------------------
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top