Sportbike World banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, im new to this fforum...and actually new to street bikes...Ive ridden dirtbikes for about 10 years or so and just recently started riding on the street. My friend has an older CBR 600 that he lets me borrow every now and then...anyways, on to my question....I live in the Mojave desert where we experience temp. extremes in the summer and winter months. Would you recomend a bike for an only means of transportation. I mean it rains once in a blue moon, and we sometimes get a tiny bit of ice in the winter but other than that its just plain hot. Ive been looking at CBR 900's (93-99). What can i do to prepare myself, and the bike for riding year round? Any input would be greatly appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Squidwannabe said:
www.msf-usa.org

Take the course. Get a smaller bike too.
Sigh. Standard brainless intenet response to any newbie post, I'm afraid.

Squidwannabe, tell me something.... ...is your advice ALL that's needed for anyone to be a safe rider, or is there more to it than that? There is? Then why didn't you give a bit more in terms of advice?

How about you guys reading this? Is this really the only advice that we can give? I could care less if it's a good place to start; you've got more to say than just this, right?

JeffroRacer, I get the idea that your original post was geared more towards bike preparation than what bike to get. Sorry I can't help you with the year-round approach (we get 2 seasons where I live; winter and construction)... ...maybe you can get some tips from some UK sites/mags (e.g., Performance Bikes magaazine, et al). Many englanders ride year-long.

If you are looking for some other advice on breaking into street riding, may I suggest a little reading? Check out the MSF's 'Guide to Motorcycling Excellence', Hough's 'Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well', and Code's 'Twist of the Wrist II'. All of these are available at sites like Amazon.com, etc.

Good luck,
-Metal
 
P

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Metal, speaking only for myself, sometimes when I am in a rush, I'll throw a snippet of advice out, knowing good and well that someone else will come along and add to it. When I am looking for advice, I like to have varying opinions, references, etc., even those that are only somewhat related to the topic, which enables me to make what I feel is a more educated decision.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Be prepares to spend lots of money on different types of gear. I knew a guy who rode a bike as his only means of transportation, the only complaint he had was the rain, which shouldn't be a problem for you. I have a car too, but I rarely drive it anymore unless it's raining or I suddenly get the urge to go 0-60 in 15 seconds with a top speed of 70mph while getting 15mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
ok since no bothered to pay attention to the question you actually asked I'll give it a shot. i'm in the same climate region as you so here is my advice. buy a camelbak hydration is a killer on motorcycles, even worse in the desert. i don't have any problems with my 6R being my main source of transportation. i would definately own another vehicle tho'. shopping is really hard on a sports bike. buy protective summertime gear like the phoenix by Joe Rocket or something similar. there are several posts in the gear section about that stuff. your choice of bike is fine IMO. the key is show some selfcontrol. people who say you should buy a 500 or 250 are looking out for you, but without the rider the bike is a paper weight. don't ride like a frickin moron and you will be ok no mater what size bike your on. do they make gun owners start out with BBs or CO2s? botom line: you can kill yourself on a moped. don't believe the "it's just a 600" line or any crap about small bikes being safe. it's all about how you ride not what you ride.
be safe.
 
P

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Back to the subject at hand...

JeffroRacer said:
Would you recomend a bike for an only means of transportation.
I would not recommend having a motorcycle as your only means of transportation, but that's just me. I think the perfect combination is a motorcycle and a pickup. I am a fair-weather rider, and cold and rain aside, I don't like to arrive at my destination if being soaked with sweat is not appropriate. Also, a pickup will come in *very* handy when the bike needs to go to the shop. Just a couple of *my* thoughts you might want to consider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
I Second The Notion

I am a desert guy too. So far as having two wheels as your only means....I have a friend that as a gixxer 7 that is his only means. If he needs to buy groceries, one of his ladies drives him.

Heat? Yeah camelback. I don't like the Phoenix jacket (personal experience with cordura) but some protection beats no protection. I like the vanson or spidi perforated leather jackets. Something about being able to sweat then have the hot air cool you rather than immediate wicking with the Phoenix.

Your bike should be just fine. You migh twant to consider upgrading the fan blades (I think Muzzy's makes a replacement) as if you're in traffic, it will run frequently.

Good luck!

P
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
speaking as a newbie

"take the course. get a smaller bike..."

speaking as a newbie ( i just got my endorsment and have been riding since November, 2000), I am glad my first bike just happened to be a kawi ex-500. My ex girlfriend gave it too me, so no thought went into the size. But I'm starting too outgrow the bike... almost. I'll buy a new bike this spring, probably a 600cc bike. But I know my limits....

And "take the course...", what else can you say to a newbie? You can explain turning, counter steering, braking, etc... till you are blue in the face. But until the newbies like myself get on a bike, you are wasting your time. Wait till they have specific questions... questions that arise as they gain more experience...

~R
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
Well, A Twist of the Wrist 1 and A Twist of the Wrist II have some of the same info in then explained in different ways, but in general, A Twist of the Wrist 1 shows more of the things like how to pick a line through a corner, when to start braking, where to look in the corners, and that kind of stuff, you know? It has some technique in it too. A Twist of the Wrist II has more Technique and seems to address the mental aspect more, how to think about what you're doing. Sometimes I have to read what he is saying two or three times to understand what he's really saying, because of some of the analogies he uses and the way he explains things. It makes sense once you understand it.

The Soft Science of Road Racing Motorcycles really gets into the mental aspect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
I agree with Pete. A small used pickup and bike would seem to be a good combination. You can ride the bike most of the time but at least you've got a warm and dry (hopefully) cabin with the pickup truck. There's always some stuff you need to haul around that a bike only household couldn't handle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Nappyboy said:
do they make gun owners start out with BBs or CO2s? botom line: you can kill yourself on a moped. don't believe the "it's just a 600" line or any crap about small bikes being safe. it's all about how you ride not what you ride.
be safe.
I wish more people would start out with bb guns. That is what I had when I was younger, and I think that it made a big difference in how I handle a gun today.

As far as starting out on a bike that is a 900, yeah, in theory you can start out on a big bike, but here is what I say about that. This subject is dead already. With that being said, I think that I have a lot of self control. Just not on my bike. That is possible you know. I just love speed. That is a problem. If the speed is there, then I will probably do it. Not that I am not a responsible person. I own two apartment complexes, I was going to school full time, I work for a huge company full time in an elctronics field, but I think I am going to have to sell my bike. I just want to be around to see my little girl grow up. I don't think I should have gotten on my 600. Even though 4 years ago I had one. And I was fine. Now I have increased my skills, but my speed has increased dramaticly. Too much. Too fast. If I had a track somewhere around here, it would be cool. But I don't. People can start out with a fast bike for thier first. I just don't think it's a good idea. Yeah, for the first few months, you are going to take it easy. YOu know what? That is half of the problem. You don't get on it in a curve when throttling out, and when you start to do that on a sport bike, you have a lot of things that are going to compensate for your shitty cornering, until one day you just wipe because you pushed the limits of your bike making up for your ass njot being able to turn. Hope that's in a safe place. But hey, I am sure that the new rider will be fine because you don't beleive in any of that crap.
Later,
bRad
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
New bike

OOPS - hit a wrong key on that last one. You just have to remember to ALWAYS be careful on a bike no matter what size it is and how old you are. There was a biker killed a couple of weeks ago just north of TWO in north GA. I didn't see the accident but have been told by reliable sources that the biker was about 50 years old on either a brand new RC51 or 929 (or maybe even a borrowed bike). He supposedly hadn't been on a bike in about a decade. The consequences of course were fatal in this case. Just don't join that category. Respect whatever you ride and never let your guard down. Ride safe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
There were actually 4 fatal motorcycle crashes in that area that weekend. One on Friday, one on Saturday and two on Sunday. The one you are talking about was a guy, like you said, that was middle aged (not a bad thing in itself, I hope), but he hadn't ridden in close to 20 years and was on a borrowed bike. One of the others was a guy that was diabetic and apparently lost consciousness and ran into an RV head on.

Last time I was up there was that weekend. I heard that the Ga State Patrol is all over the place up there now. The group I ride with all decided that we would just let the squids have that area for a while and find other places to ride. There's plenty of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Plenty?

Plenty of squids or other places to ride?? I've noticed there has been a heavier police presence up there over the past month or so. I've only been able to get back up there once on the weekend. I was lucky enough to have a day off last week in the middle of the week and the riding was wonderful. My brother and I went all over the place up there and so zero police (except for the ones at McDonalds when we were getting coffee on the way up). That 129 up Blood Mountain is simply incredible. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that someday they'll repave the Richard Russell Highway. Have fun!:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
I meant plenty of roads, but there are plenty of squids up there,too. :D

Yeah, if you are lucky enough to get a day to ride during the week, it's some of the best riding I've ever seen anywhere. Speaking of Hiway 129 on Blood Mountain, one of the guys I ride with highsided his 929 up there 3 weeks ago. He's OK, but it trashed the bike pretty good. He was knocked unconscious for 8 minutes. The paramedics cut his leathers off of him, so now he has to fix the bike AND get new leathers. :crying:
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
metal_on_metal said:


Sigh. Standard brainless intenet response to any newbie post, I'm afraid.

Squidwannabe, tell me something.... ...is your advice ALL that's needed for anyone to be a safe rider, or is there more to it than that? There is? Then why didn't you give a bit more in terms of advice?
Yup, that's it !

If you are looking for some other advice on breaking into street riding, may I suggest a little reading? Check out the MSF's 'Guide to Motorcycling Excellence', Hough's 'Proficient Motorcycling: The Ultimate Guide to Riding Well', and Code's 'Twist of the Wrist II'. All of these are available at sites like Amazon.com, etc.
I highly recommend Twist of the Wrist II for a beginner "breaking into street riding" as you so put it. Good call.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top