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Discussion Starter #1
I have looked at different "slip-on" cans and was just curious.
1. Which one is best performer and sounding?
2. I saw in Vance & Hines site that for the SS2-R it is not mandatory to re-jet the carbs. Is this a step I should have done? What is difference if I do vs. Don't?:confused:
 

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Don't know about the specifics of your Katana or V&H, but if a manufacturer says that their slip-on does not require re-jetting on your bike, then you should be OK. MC's run lean (lowish fuel to air ratio) in order to pass smog. Almost any aftermarket exhaust is less restictive than stock so more air/fuel is run through the engine. Usually this means that more fuel needs to be run through the carbs to match up with more intake air. Re-jetting to larger jets increases the fuel to air ratio. If the slip-on is not significantly less restrictive, then no more fuel is needed. Check your pipe for residue color after the new pipe has been run some. If it's white/light grey (or if it the exhaust "pops" or backfires a lot), you're probably too lean and probably should re-jet. If it's dark grey, then OK. If really black/sooty, then too rich.
 

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Not a stupid question, but covered in at least one earlier thread.

Re-jetting refers to changing the air/fuel mixture on a carburetor in one or more of 3 different ways: changing the size of the small device that meters the gas (jet) in the pilot (idle and just off-idle) and/or main flow, adjusitng the pilot mixture screws, or adjusting (usually with a shim) the most closed position of the needle valve that regulates the flow of fuel with throttle position.

This is done to improve performance (get rid of flat spots at certain rpms, or compensate for a new exhaust) and can become a never-ending process if you get really picky about it. I believe that most fuel injected bikes allow electronic (PROM) changes for this.
 
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