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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I have been looking into buying a motorcycle for awhile as a weekend thing (I just bought a new Hyundai Tiburon, so I'm set in the car dept.) I want to do this right though, and take the Moto rider safety course. Has anyone taken this course? Is it worth it? I really don't have anyone who can teach me otherwise, and I have never ridden before. Also I am thinking about getting a 90 some odd Kawasaki EX-500. I heard that it's a great starter bike. What do you all think, is it worth it to get started into motorcycling???

Thanks!

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Aril, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Sportbike newbie:
is it worth it to get started into motorcycling???
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


What a Question! You came to the right place my friend! To answer your question: HELL YES its worth getting into if you do it right. Take the MSF course for sure. The Kawi. EX500 is an excellent starter bike IMO. And welcome to the forum. :)


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Kyle J.-
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I agree with kyle 900%, as usual. if you can afford the 94 or so newer ninja 500, go for it. you can tell by the ninja stickers, nice fairing and disk brake at the rear.

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Tony

the views and opinions expressed by tony (cbrf2boy) are the ramblings of a total idiot. sbw.com, it's administrators, moderators, and members don't necessarily agree with and are not responsible for anything this idiot has to say.

[This message has been edited by cbrf2boy (edited July 05, 2000).]
 

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As usuall, Kyle is da man. :rolleyes: If the Tiburon is enough sports car for you, the EX-500 will never let you down. It's not the best, but it is a load of fun. Definately take the MSF course, what you save in insurance alone will repay the cost of the course. And considering we all ride, of course we all think it is worth the time, effort, and investment.

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Colin
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TAKE THE MSF COURSE. :)

That is a great bike if you're not very big. Take your time with purchasing, especially used bikes. Take some one who knows bikes and you trust when shopping for used bikes. You should really consider getting the Kawasaki ZX-12. :rolleyes: Just kidding about the ZX-12. ;)

Good Luck.

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Ride Hard!

John
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Me again,

Yeah, anyone know how much that MSF course usually costs? I am in San Diego by the way. Also, I am 6'1" 195 lbs, is that too big for the Kawa EX-500? What are some good begginer bikes for someone of my size? Thanks guys!

Group Hug!

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i took the course 2 months ago. i paid $20 or $25 for the class. it went from 6pm to 10 on friday and 8 am to 6 pm on sat and sun. it was money well spent. i've only been riding streetbike since march. i'm 5'10" and my honda is a comfortable fit. when i went looking for bikes in the spring i wanted to get a bike that i would want to keep for a couple of years. i felt that i would outgrow a 500 in a couple of months. i was looking at 600's when i found my hurricane. for a learning bike the 500 is a excellent place to start. it would be a perfect around town bike. i think that you would find it a little underpowered on the highways or for any long trips. like RCjohn said find a buddy and take him shopping with you. and don't buy an 883 harley

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Blind women think i look like George Clooney
 

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Nash I think you look like George Clooney too. :D :D Good advice on the 883. ;)

...Newbie, I'm a little heavier than you(okay, I weigh 245lbs) and I would suggest that you go with something bigger. I learned on a 96 Honda VFR. In my opinion, I think you should look at a later model 600 such as the YZF600R(not R6). You can get one of those used at a reasonable price and it is a proven format for the street. My wife owned a '98 YZF and I put most of the miles on it. It is a lot of fun and had more horsepower than my VFR. It would be a great bike for you. ;)

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Ride Hard!

John
 

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Hey, Newbie, and welcome to the World of Sportbikes. Guess that's why they call this website what they do.......

I was where you are a few years ago and faced with some of the same decisions you are now facing. I finally settled on a Yamaha YZF 600.....mild mannered enough if you lay off the "loud pedal (handle?)" but always willing to move on down the road at high velocities. It was something that I knew I could grow into. Sit on every bike you can, and find a model that is comfortable for you. Everybody is different.

As others have pointed out, don't go too small or underpowered, because the only thing you will learn how to ride is small, underpowered Sportbikes. Having said that, I can't reccommend anything much bigger than a 750 for a "first bike", since you may very well get easily frustrated just trying to hold the thing up at stop lights.

DEFINITELY take somebody knowledgeable with you to check out any used bikes you want to look at. Unless you know the complete history of sportbikes, or even a particular model, you could get easily burned on a purchase you are stuck with and won't be able to get your money back out of, if you don't like it. I'm sure others have horror stories they can tell.

I can't speak from experience on the MSF course, but everyone I ride with raves about it as a great confidence builder.

Lastly, we are all interested in your progress, so please let us know how you're doing.





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"After all, we ARE professionals, here."
 

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Welcome to the show!

I would normally suggest the 500 as a first bike but at 195 you may feel a bit sluggish as you advance your riding skill. My suggestion would be to check out an SV-650, YZF 600R (not R6), or maybe a Honda Hawk. You want to be able to have power available when you become more experienced. The mid-size bikes should deliver plenty of power at a reasonable rate. It's up to you how much of that available power you want to apply. Oh yeah, take the MSF course. It will be one of the best investments you will ever make as a motorcyclist. Good Luck :D

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The MSF course is great. I highly recommend it to anyone wanting to learn how to ride.

As for a starter bike, I would vote for getting a 600 size. As for which make, my vote would be for the CBR's. I haven't ridden that many different bikes in my time, but the CBR's do feel a bit more confortable than some of the others makes because of the less agressive riding position. Granted, I'm only 5'7", which probably lends to why I like the CBR's riding position. :D

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i'd still go for the ex500. spend a year with it and you won't get hurt real bad when you sell it. buy a yzf600 and it may be hard to sell. generally bikes that didn't sell well new will be hard to sell used. at least the ex has a strong new rider market.

if you buy an sv, you'll have it until it's paid for (which isn't a bad thing, but most street guys don't really show it much love). if you buy a yzf, you'll probably lose a grand or so when you sell. buy the ex, and keep it a year sell it for almost what you paid and buy a new gsxr600.

as for the hawk, i'd guess that the ex actually is more powerful, it's just that the ex has a frame that harley would be proud of.

just my .02

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Tony

the views and opinions expressed by tony (cbrf2boy) are the ramblings of a total idiot. sbw.com, it's administrators, moderators, and members don't necessarily agree with and are not responsible for anything this idiot has to say.
 

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I would just like to add the Yamaha Seca II as a good beginner bike IMO. I had a 96 Seca II and it had enough handling and power to get me hooked. I did outgrow it and wanted something sportier (F2) after grinding the pegs (I know, didn't think it could be done, did you?) but it was a good, confidence inspiring bike. I think it made me a better rider by not having the cutting edge to begin with. My $.02...

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"It's better to be dead and cool than to be alive and uncool." -Harley from Harley Davidson & The Marlboro Man
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hey guys n' gals,

Thanks so much for all the GREAT replies, what a great forum. I think I have even talked my friend into the MSF too. (We have both wanted to ride since we were 17) Of course everyone is telling me how dangerous it is, but I think as long as you are in tune with the road and your bike, you should be fine, right? lol. I was looking at the SECA II as well, and I do have a friend that sportbikes (He has a CBR) so I will call on his expertise. I will let everyone know my progress....and I will continue to post more questions, i'm sure!

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I'll put in a vote for a CBR F2 or F3. I think you would be bored with the 500 in no time. The MSF course is an absolute must. Also, with all the new riders, you can see what everyone else is getting for some good ideas as well. I started off on a Honda Magna---don't go there :) . It was fun for awhile, and a great beginner bike IMO but damn that thing sucked in the twisties. Good luck in your decision, I know it took me forever to figure out which sportbike I wanted--too many good choices (how many time as a consumer can you say that?)

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Clark
 

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I wanted to add something else. Not to make purchasing a bike seem like a downer but it it wise to consider the risk involved. We have an addage in motorcycling <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Aril, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>"there are two kinds of riders; those that have gone down and those that will"<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Be sure to get good riding apparrel along with your scoot. I have been saved several times just by the gear.

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Newbie-keep in mind, dropping (off side stand, etc.)a bike with a fairing can easily cost $700 to fix-more if you crash. All that plastic and paint costs a lot. I believe an SV650(naked sportbike-no plastic) is the way to go for you, being a larger guy. If you dump it it won't cost as much to fix. Dumping a bike can happen to anyone but IMO newbies are especially vulnerable.

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SFV ~~~~ >=:)>
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