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Discussion Starter #1
Iam a young guy of 25 with a 2 year old kid. I've devoted all my time and finaces available to me to my son for the last two years.(not complaining theres nothing more important to me in the world).
So recently I purchased a 2002 R6, just so you know Iam a newbie rider first bike and I know that it may be considered outta my league but I loved it when I saw it and just had to have it.
So while riding with some friends (who are more experienced riders) I went wide in a 30 mph turn and ended up in the dirt losing control of my bike and going over the handlebars. Thankfully Im not hurt outside of a bruised hip and a pinched nerve in my left a$$cheek.
I dont feel I was exceeding my skill I just miscalculated the turn I was only doing about 45mph. But everyone keeps ragging me telling me to get rid of my bike and just because I have only 500 miles on my bike that Im going to end up killing myself.
I basiclly told them to f off but it still erks me.
Well I guess I'm just looking for support in my endeaver as its hard to find here. I know I'm not a great rider yet but I want to at least try to get good.
 

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R6inator said:

I dont feel I was exceeding my skill I just miscalculated the turn I was only doing about 45mph.
Skill level is only partly comprised of your ability to ride. The bigger part of skill level is your ability to calculate the inputs, and process the environment your in. So if you miscalculated the turn, then you were exceeding your skill level. It's a common mistake made by new riders..and old ones too....

Does this mean you should give up riding? No...but it does mean you need to slow down and think about what your doing a little better.

Did you take a beginner rider course? if you didn't then I would suggest you do before you spend another minute on the R6. That bike is a bitch for a first bike...it isn't as forgiving as some other 600's and without the proper training, you're increasing your chances of getting hurt or killed on it or any other bike..

Just some food for thought.
 

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I don't think you should have to sell your bike but I do think that you should be more careful and ride with in your abilities. It seems like you were trying to keep up with the riders of higher skill but because of lack of experience, you wrecked. Personally I would say your responsibilties are with your child. Ideally you wouldn't put your childs growth into an adult at risk by riding a motorcycle at all, but this isn't an ideal world. I would say that you should just take it easier. It's hard, especially when those competitive juices get flowing. I think your friends just don't want you to orphan your kid over 1 days worth of thrills on a motorcycle. Start off slowly....the learning curve for a bike is real strange in that you begin to feel comfortable quickly but your ability to deal with a crisis situation doesn't come for months or perhaps years down the line. Sounds like a crisis came up (coming into a corner too hot) and you weren't sure how to deal with it. Give it time and hang back from your experienced friends.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Re: Re: Recent crash getting me flak.

RedNinja said:


Skill level is only partly comprised of your ability to ride. The bigger part of skill level is your ability to calculate the inputs, and process the environment your in. So if you miscalculated the turn, then you were exceeding your skill level. It's a common mistake made by new riders..and old ones too....

Does this mean you should give up riding? No...but it does mean you need to slow down and think about what your doing a little better.

Did you take a beginner rider course? if you didn't then I would suggest you do before you spend another minute on the R6. That bike is a bitch for a first bike...it isn't as forgiving as some other 600's and without the proper training, you're increasing your chances of getting hurt or killed on it or any other bike..

Just some food for thought.
Ya you are right no matter how much I dont want to say it. IT WAS MY FAULT. And I suppose I began to think I was better than I acctually am, motorcycles are funny that way.
I am unable to take a basic course till February,suxs living in SOCAL,but I dont want to garage her for 3 months till I get in the course.
I suppose I'll just tell my friends that I wont be riding with them for awhile unless they want to take it slow and follow me. When they get in front of me I notice I go faster than I probably normally would evan though I still try to check myself. I'm just glad that my first experiene with a [email protected]#k up wasnt one that will leave to much permanant damage other than to reminding me TO TAKE IT SLOW.


P/S: I just want to say that my first gear jacket and Arai helmet exceeded any expectations during this crash.My helmet cracked on the ground 3 times before I came to a stop yet I felt nothing other than the impact and my jacket outside of being scuffed looks like I just bought it.
Im keeping the jacket and getting another Arai...
 

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Well it sounds like you are approaching this from the right perspective. I wouldn't say don't go out and ride before you get in that class, but I would say to choose who you ride with and where you carefully...peer pressure is probably one of the biggest causes of wrecks for new riders too...you think you can follow that guy blasting through the twisties, but in reality you don't have the time in the saddle to have a skill level like that...definately hunt around to see if you can get on a standby list for the class...most places have one...

Good luck to you!
 

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Here's a couple of thoughts, not meant to be ugly... just to think about:

"I've devoted all my time and finaces available to me to my son for the last two years (not complaining theres nothing more important to me in the world).... So recently I purchased a 2002 R6..."

If your son is now 2 yrs old, that means you only have about 16 more years to go... not that you have earned a break that takes you off the hook now, somehow. You don't mention a mom, so I guess you are the sole provider for him? If so, this is what is called a "responsibility" and you have to deal with it. How will your son be supported if you are not there? You landed on your butt this time but that's luck, not skill. What if it was your neck and "Bingo, you're a quad now!" You have life insurance, I hope?

"I dont feel I was exceeding my skill I just miscalculated the turn..."

To me, if I crash, I exceeded my skill (unless somebody else just flat runs over me).
 

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Shame on your "friends" for not concidering your skill level on your ride. When I ride with a newbie I definatly take it easy. I mean the more the marrier when it comes to motorcycling and we don't want the new guys to crash and give up the sport all together. When riding with a group it is the responcibility of the lead rider to keep speeds to a comfortable level for all in the group. If there is a wide range of ability levels then pick a spot to meet up, if the "Fast guys" want to get ahead. Don't get discouraged just because you had a fall. You seem to be OK and your bike can be fixed. In the future if the group gets ahead don't crash trying to keep up. Pick a rider you can trust not to lead you to quickly and learn from him/her.
 

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This seems to be a very common dilemma. Juggling responsibility with living life. I agree that your friends should have been more considerate to your skill level, but with bikes it appears that you allways have to approach things as if it's going to be your fault no matter what. If somebody hits you with their car and is clearly in the wrong, knowing that will be small consolation if you are paralyzed or dead.

Oh yeah. If it were me, I'd keep ridin' (more carefully). But that's just my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Joss said:
Here's a couple of thoughts, not meant to be ugly... just to think about:



If your son is now 2 yrs old, that means you only have about 16 more years to go... not that you have earned a break that takes you off the hook now, somehow. You don't mention a mom, so I guess you are the sole provider for him? If so, this is what is called a "responsibility" and you have to deal with it. How will your son be supported if you are not there? You landed on your butt this time but that's luck, not skill. What if it was your neck and "Bingo, you're a quad now!" You have life insurance, I hope?

Acctually his mother is around we are seperated but I still see them both everyday. I understand my responsibilty to my son and nothing would crush me more than to not be the father I need to be for him.I just enjoy riding and I dont want to be talked into giving it up because I made a mistake that I dont plan on making again ever.I admit I wasnt staying in my comfort zone but needless to say I learned and lived so now I only want to get better.

By the way thancks for all the advice and support I wont take it like anyones raggin on me its just opinions and evan if I dont really want to hear I should still listen because hey someones been there and done that.Better to learn than not know.

Thanks all.
 

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My opinion is that for a new rider, group riding is not the way to go. The only exception is when the more experienced riders are willing to let the new rider lead. My recommendation would be solo rides until you are familiar and comfortable with maneuvering a motorcycle. I think by riding alone in the beginning, you remove both the conscious and unconcious desire to "keep up" "go fast" "don't wan't to hold up my buddies." You can then learn at your own pace.
 

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Ted900 said:
My opinion is that for a new rider, group riding is not the way to go. The only exception is when the more experienced riders are willing to let the new rider lead. My recommendation would be solo rides until you are familiar and comfortable with maneuvering a motorcycle. I think by riding alone in the beginning, you remove both the conscious and unconcious desire to "keep up" "go fast" "don't wan't to hold up my buddies." You can then learn at your own pace.
Riding with a group does not have to be that bad. About six months after I started I went on a ride with the Texas Sportbike Association. They followed a philosophy called "The Pace". A lot of people here have probably heard of it but for those who haven't.

www.tsba.org/riding.html

It stresses riding within your comfort zone.
I learned a bunch about riding, my capabilities and my bikes capabilities. And it was a lot of fun.
 

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I think it is important for you to get back on the bike. One thing to be careful of, is flashbacks. There is a good chance that the next time you get into a corner, you'll flashback to this crash, and that will affect your ability to handle the corner your in. Being aware of it goes a long way towards fighting it. I know after my crash, the next time I got on a road similar to the one I crashed on, I panicked. I had to pull over, take some deep breaths.

There is another thread going on right now about trusting your bike, and that is a hard thing to learn. Fortuantely, the MSF course does kinda beat that into you. The phrase that I held in my mind as I was learning was "If your not dragging parts, the bike will lean farther." Get back on the bike, and take the advice others have presented here in this thread. Go your own pace. As you start getting more comfortable with your bike, and your ability to control it increase, speed will come as a by-product. Take it easy, and keep it rubber side down.
 

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Lot's of great advice given from those who have gone before (probably gone "down" too). Fact is, if you ride, you will crash. People driving cars eventually crash too. Glad to hear you were wearing a good helmet and jacket. Never ride without them, not even just around the block!
Heed the info about life insurance to provide for your son, don't ride in groups till you get more experience and the picture tape to the tank sounds pretty damn good too. Oh yeah, have fun.:D
Trying to get an R6 for my wife today. Actually I'll probably ride it more than her, but the story is it's for her.
 

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I can tell by the fact that you say "It's my fault" that you will be fine. There are no excuses in this game, only misjudgement and pain (If you're lucky, pain is all you get!) If you find yourself riding scared because trying to keep up is forcing you to ride at speeds you're not comfortable with, then let them go on ahead, and meet them later. I use the word scared because, let's face it, no manly man wants to admit to being afraid; but on a bike all that attitude will get you is dead. I've been scared, I've backed off, and I'm still here riding after 21 years.
At this point, don't work on being fast. Work on being smooth, and fast will take care of itself.
 

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Just take it easy. At least now you are aware of the error. Keep the bike... too late to tell you the R6 isnt for newbies...
 

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Don't just leave the bike in the Garage!!! You're not gonna learn anything that way. I'd be inclined to ride the bike everywhere.
I personally think its wrong for a newbie to buy a bike and head straight out to their local twisties
Give yourself a chance to get used to your bike before you start mixing it up with experienced riders.
(I nearly bit a rock wall by not listening to that advice):eek:
Remember, sports bikes are funny things..They always want to go faster when other sports bikes are around;)
 

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PJ1 said:
Shame on your "friends" for not concidering your skill level on your ride. When I ride with a newbie I definatly take it easy. I mean the more the marrier when it comes to motorcycling and we don't want the new guys to crash and give up the sport all together. When riding with a group it is the responcibility of the lead rider to keep speeds to a comfortable level for all in the group. If there is a wide range of ability levels then pick a spot to meet up, if the "Fast guys" want to get ahead. Don't get discouraged just because you had a fall. You seem to be OK and your bike can be fixed. In the future if the group gets ahead don't crash trying to keep up. Pick a rider you can trust not to lead you to quickly and learn from him/her.
very well said PJ...Not that I'm the fastest in our group..but I will follow the slowest riders, just to make sure all is well...and new riders appreciate more experienced riders lookin out for them..I always welcome faster riders following me, to opoint out any mistakes, or improvments I could make...

Good ol peer presure...a new riders worst enemey..most times..
 

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R6INATOR,

I know how you feel about your son. I took up riding again 2 years ago after 12 years with no bike. I have tried to make sure my 2 sons have had a good dad around (that's me...don't laugh). They are 13 and 11 and will be well taken care of if something happens to me now. I used to race every time I thru a leg over. Had a couple of bad falls (you just pinched ass nerve...I still have no feeling on my right ass after 15 years). Bottom line is kid should come first.

OK, now the lecture is over...Should you stop riding? NO. Just be careful. So what happened in the curve? Did you feel you couldn't lean anymore. You didn't say any of your friends went down, so speed was not the problem (You should be analyzing this yourself). My guess is you THOUGHT you went in too hot, got on the brakes and made the bike stand up. That is why you went wide (been there, done that). You really need to take the safety course. Another problem I had as a newbie was as soon as the bike was warm and I was in the country, I would be in triple digits. It takes alot of disipline to control the wrist. I also highly recommend reading a sportbike book (Twist of the Wrist). If you must go fast, think about track days with a club. I have worked at tracks with club riders. There is a BIG difference. I have seen 70mph getoffs (many times). Literally 9 times out of 10, the rider walks away. Why? Because after they leave the bike and start sliding, they don't hit anything. No signs, fences, ditches or cars. And in the rare instance a rider is hurt, there is an ambulance right there. Think about it, it's the only safe (and legal) way to go fast. Just hope you can afford it.

In the meantime, take it easy and have fun...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
waynofzr said:
R6INATOR,

I know how you feel about your son. I took up riding again 2 years ago after 12 years with no bike. I have tried to make sure my 2 sons have had a good dad around (that's me...don't laugh). They are 13 and 11 and will be well taken care of if something happens to me now. I used to race every time I thru a leg over. Had a couple of bad falls (you just pinched ass nerve...I still have no feeling on my right ass after 15 years). Bottom line is kid should come first.

OK, now the lecture is over...Should you stop riding? NO. Just be careful. So what happened in the curve? Did you feel you couldn't lean anymore. You didn't say any of your friends went down, so speed was not the problem (You should be analyzing this yourself). My guess is you THOUGHT you went in too hot, got on the brakes and made the bike stand up. That is why you went wide (been there, done that). You really need to take the safety course. Another problem I had as a newbie was as soon as the bike was warm and I was in the country, I would be in triple digits. It takes alot of disipline to control the wrist. I also highly recommend reading a sportbike book (Twist of the Wrist). If you must go fast, think about track days with a club. I have worked at tracks with club riders. There is a BIG difference. I have seen 70mph getoffs (many times). Literally 9 times out of 10, the rider walks away. Why? Because after they leave the bike and start sliding, they don't hit anything. No signs, fences, ditches or cars. And in the rare instance a rider is hurt, there is an ambulance right there. Think about it, it's the only safe (and legal) way to go fast. Just hope you can afford it.

In the meantime, take it easy and have fun...
Well crud I submitted a reply howevere I recieved an error I will repost tommarrow with the details on my crash but today I must rest and try and massage some feeling back into my a$$ and ego :)
Take care all.
 
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