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Discussion Starter #1
Just heard a radio quiz where one of the questions was, "What date was the Boxing Day tsunami?"






The caller, a woman, answered, "December 24th." :rolleyes:
 

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Forgive my american ignorance, but what the hell is boxing day?

Is that the day all the aussies go outside and box kangaroos?:twofinger
 

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HAHAHA, you guys crack me up! :laughing:

Here... this might help exlain Boxing Day.

Boxing Day Origin

Nowadays when we think of “Boxing Day,” the word “sale” almost immediately follows. After all, December 26 is the day when stores dramatically reduce the prices of their year-end merchandise and thus attract throngs of eager shoppers who would storm the malls in a frenzied mission to snatch up bargains. As exciting as this may be, it is important that we remember the true spirit behind this special day and not neglect its rich history.

The Boxing Day tradition began in Britain possibly as early as in the Middle Ages; with regards to its origin, there are two main schools of thought. Some historians maintain that it began as a holiday tradition where house servants, who always had to work on Christmas days, were rewarded the day after. Their employers would put gifts such as food, clothing, or money in “Christmas boxes,” which the servants would then take with them as they departed for family visits. Others say that Boxing Day is so named because churches collected money for the poor in wooden boxes and usually opened them to hand out alms on the day after Christmas. Today, Boxing Day is celebrated in most of the other English-speaking countries that include Canada, Australia and New Zealand, the United States being a notable exception.

The spirit of generosity surrounding this day is best exemplified by the fact that December 26 is also St. Stephen’s Day. St. Stephen was one of the seven original deacons in the Christian Church. He was stoned to death by an angry mob for his devoted piety and faith in Christ. As he expired in a slow and painful death, St. Stephen uttered a powerful prayer in which he begged God to forgive his persecutors. Many consider him to be the first martyr.

Boxing Day is therefore much more than a fun day at the mall; it is meant to be a day of giving and sharing, and of charity and appreciation in an extension of seasonal joy.
 

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Hi cookeetree-

Here is your story translated into American vernacular to illustrate our interesting and unique heritage:
The Day After Christmas Origin

Nowadays when we think of “The Day After Christmas,” the word “sale” almost immediately follows. After all, December 26 is the day when stores dramatically reduce the prices of their merchandise and attract throngs of eager and mostly female shoppers who storm the malls in a frenzied mission to snatch up bargains. It is not uncommon to see women engaging in a tug-of-war over a discounted sweater or handbag at these events. As exciting as this may be, it is important that we remember the true spirit behind this special day and not neglect its rich history.

The Day After Christmas tradition began in the United States around the turn of the last century and was popularized by large retailers like Macy's, Bloomingdale's, Sears, Wal-Mart, Target, and Dayton Hudson. Some historians maintain that it began as a holiday tradition where white and blue collar workers alike jumped in their enormous SUV vehicles and aimed them towards the shopping centers. Their employers would put gifts such as measly bonuses in “Christmas boxes,” which the workers would then take with them to help reduce credit card debt the following month. Others say that the Day After Christmas is so named because churches collected money for the poor in wooden boxes and usually opened them for distribution on December 26. Today, the Day After Christmas is celebrated in many English-speaking countries. A peculiar custom in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand is that they call these festivities "Boxing Day" for some bizarre reason.

The Day After Christmas is therefore much more than a fun day at the mall; it is meant to be a day of giving and sharing, and of charity and appreciation in an extension of seasonal joy.
:D

~ Blue Jays ~
 

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With as many people as I've seen fighting over sale items on the day after Christmas, it could certainly be called boxing day here as well. It's all about giving. Giving the other bastard a black eye for having the audacity to take the last one of whatever it is you wanted.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The crowds at the Boxing Day sales here are extraordinary. They pile-up against the doors, waiting for them to open, then it's every man, woman and child for themself.

Sure, you can save a sh*tload of money on stuff, but you still couldn't drag me there.
 
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