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I was looking at the classifids on this site earlier. The prices seem resonable. I saw a 04' Busa for like 4000, or something like that. Anyway, do the prices for the bikes seem resonable to you guys. I am looking for a used bike to but and just trying to get a feel for prices for bikes in general; nothing specific. Let me know what ou guys think...thanks

-Matt
 

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FUCKING SCAMMERS

i hate all these people posting their damn 04 r1's and 05 gsxr's and "selling" them for like 3500 bucks. its sad that people are really that stupid to think they are getting THAT big of a deal without realizing that they are gettin taken for their money. how do police/FBI not close in on these people and shut their shit down? anyone else angered by this?
 

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What pisses me off is that the guy selling the Busa in our local paper has his bike listed right by mine. Makes mine look way overpriced.
 

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Exactly how do these scams work? Do they take the money and not give the bike? Give a wrecked bike? What's the deal?
 

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Re: FUCKING SCAMMERS

WingChunWarrior said:
i hate all these people posting their damn 04 r1's and 05 gsxr's and "selling" them for like 3500 bucks. its sad that people are really that stupid to think they are getting THAT big of a deal without realizing that they are gettin taken for their money. how do police/FBI not close in on these people and shut their shit down? anyone else angered by this?

I know we're all tired of all the internet scams. Only problem, is that a lot of them originate overseas. Like the Nigerian scams and such. If it's to good to be true, then it probably is.
 

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lateott_156 said:
Exactly how do these scams work? Do they take the money and not give the bike? Give a wrecked bike? What's the deal?
Often times there is no bike. The seller will tell you that for some very important reason, the bike just happens to be in (insert some country here, ussually europe, often time military related) and that they will have it shipped to you.
 

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I saw this article the other day:


The folks at the title loan company were suspicious. Here was this guy with a new car, one with a book value somewhere in the mid-$20,000s. He had enough dough to pay cash for this car. But now he wanted to take out a $5,000 loan using the car as collateral. Something didn't jibe.

The company called the Department of Motor Vehicles Compliance Enforcement Division. Investigators there established that the title was a fake. Police officers from the CED headed down to the title company, where they witnessed the man's attempted transaction with the title company, then arrested him.

The man didn't have only a fake title to the vehicle. He also had a fake registration--even bogus license plate decals. Where'd he get them?

"A lot of the time, people won't tell you where they got this stuff," said Allen Byers, DMV compliance enforcement investigator. "Or they'll just say they got it 'on the street.' This guy--he just rolled."

Byers said the documents were nearly perfect. And he marveled at the bargain price that the counterfeiter was charging for the package deal, which can cost a good deal more than $100.

"We've seen reports of up to $1,200," Byers said.

The CED officers obtained a search warrant for the home on East Second Street where they suspected counterfeit documents were being made.

After the house was cleared, the DMV investigation team went in for a look. They found more than 100 fraudulent documents and a high-end computer system.

"Titles, IDs, birth certificates," Byers said. "I was surprised at the volume. We weren't expecting it to turn out so big. ... This is probably the biggest [bust] we've done since I've been here. I think it made a good impact."

Officers found about 200 compact discs with images of documents from states across the country, Byers said.

It's easier to pass off a fake document, like a vehicle title, from another state because the folks who work the counters at the DMV--though trained in spotting fakes--often don't know all the security features of official documents printed in all 50 states.

Tips for consumers buying used vehicles:

1. Always buy from a dealer or someone you know, or is known to a friend, and has an established history in your community. If they want to show you their vehicle at a restaurant parking lot and not at their home, be careful.

2. Check to see if all serial nos. and VINs cross-match on the title, registration, and proof of insurance.

3. Don’t rush into a deal, no matter how much pressure the seller puts on you or how good the deal is. Tell them you want to copy all of the information and run it by a policeman friend of yours to make sure everything is OK. If the seller balks at this, walk away.

4. Remember, once your money is gone, it’s gone. The authorities can only offer you sympathy and lots of paperwork to fill out.

Scams are rampant. Use common sense. A little paranoia doesn’t hurt either.
 
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