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I can only speak for my local area, and it might be different in yours. This is what I normally take.

#1 Bike in good condition

#2 75% tires

#3 Full leathers (Gloves, and boots included)

#4 Helmet

#5 Water (or water-weter) in your radiator

#6 Water to drink

#7 Extra Gas

#8 Lights (front and back), turn signals, and mirrors taped up.

#9 Extra master link for your chain.

#10 Tire pressure gage

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Robert Basil
It ain't easy being green - Kermit the frog
But it sure is fun! - Robert Basil
 

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One tip on taping glass: Use masking tape on the glass surfaces, then use duct tape over that. Makes it much easier to remove. Ivan, service writer at Santa Cruz BMW/Triumph, gave me that tip.

As Robert mentioned (three times) take extra water. Also, take some snack foods along. Bananas and apples are good, as are bagels.

Hydrate yourself the day before the track day so you won't dehydrate while riding. Refraining from alcohol is a good idea too. You do not want a hangover when you get to the track.

And don't forget a change of underwear, just in case you scare yourself.

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by photobug:
One tip on taping glass: Use masking tape on the glass surfaces, then use duct tape over that. Makes it much easier to remove. Ivan, service writer at Santa Cruz BMW/Triumph, gave me that tip.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Great tip! I'll have to remember this the next time I'm out!




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Robert Basil
It ain't easy being green - Kermit the frog
But it sure is fun! - Robert Basil
 

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Looks like the weather is going to let up so I can go to the track for the very first time. Tech inspection at the track is not a problem, they're pretty relaxed, and there's only going to be six or eight of us on the whole track all day. Matter of fact, last time this group went I guess they got rained out so they just took their cars out instead. Anyway, I was hoping you all could help with a list of things I should check before hitting the track. Common sense will take care of most things but I'm sure there are a few things I wouldn't have thought of. Thanks.

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James

If you're gonna ride a couch, why not just stay home?
 

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The most important thing I can think of is
an umbrella girl. ;)

As you said, common sense would take care
of most everything... Good tires, tire pressure
Fresh oil and filter. You might want to remove
your peg feelers... I think this thread
really might belong in the Track Days/Racing
forum but it's a grey area b/c it is a "how
do I" question also.



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Oh yeah! Hey, the little elevator thingy on the side of the screen makes it scroll down!! :) Had I noticed that forum I think I would have put it in there. I'll pay the fine, just don't put any points on my license. :D

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James

If you're gonna ride a couch, why not just stay home?
 

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yea, that is a good tip.

the closest track to me doesnt require n e thing. u can ride in a thong w/flip flops if u wanted. but for sanctioned events & other tracks then a lot more is needed. even for a track like the 1st u will of course want the previously mentioned gear/prep but u should also saftey wire some items such as oil plug, & radiator cap. sliders on the bars & frames would be a good idea too. bring spares such as clip ons & pegs. u may think that just because there is a few of u & its not a full blown race that u wont crash.. its still possible & u will still need parts if u do.. the only thing is.. there wont be the race day parts pimp to sell u overpriced crap so bring your own reasonably priced good stuff.

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Requirements vary from club to club, track to track, event to event and even group to group. Team Pro-Motion for example, has a different level of prep for each of the four groups. White(beginners) requires basically a bike in good condition whereas the other groups progress until the fourth group which basically requires full race preparations.

I have prepped my RC for the track. Safety wired vital components(brakes claipers, oil drain plug, oil fill cap, oil filter, axle pinch bolts). I haven't replaced the coolant with water and Water Wetter yet but I plan to soon. Most tracks/clubs require full leathers(2 piece if zipped together for most), DOT/Snell full faced helmet, gauntlet style gloves, above ankle leather boots.

So far I agree with all of the advice given. I have not been to a track day but I am well aware of what can happen to a bike and rider under extreme track conditions. ;)

BTW, The best advice so far is the Umbrella Girl. :D :D

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John

"If Harley made an airplane... would you fly in it?"
 

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don't use honda spray polish on the bike when you clean it. tech stickers don't stick to it.

be relaxed.

if it's for a track day, you likely won't have to do too much to pass. check steering head bearings (the only thing i didn't see covered).

if you're racing (i didn't see the original string), you'll need to by-pass the standup kill switch and remove the side stand.
 

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Thanks for the info! It was just a mess around day and the track is privately owned so all I had to do was tape all my lenses and prove it didn't leak any oil.

Being that this was my first track experience I could spout explatives for pages but I'll try and sum it up as much as possible. First of all, if you've never been on a track and you get the opportunity, GO!!! I was a little intimidated because there were more bikes there than I thought and some were fully prepped race bikes, slicks and all. I figured I would just be in the way. It turns out that once everyone gets spread out on the track (it's about two miles), the traffic is not that heavy. I was also worried about how to let the fast guys through. If any of you are the fast guys you are probably laughing at that one. Turns out all I had to do is do what we were told to do in the riders' meeting, which was just to hold a steady line and the fast guys can easily make a safe pass.

One of the guys I know from in town that races a YZF750 took me out and had me get right on his ass and he showed me the proper line for a few laps and then curiously disappeared giving chase to a guy on an R1 that passed us. I soon grew bored with winding up to 175(indicated) on the straight, which any idiot with a wrist that turns can do, and decided to save the motor and just work on my line through the corners. And boy did that take some getting used to. They take it in wide and a lot deeper than I ever imagined. At first I kept finding myself clear inside early with nowhere to go but wide on the exit. I had to force myself to stay out, stay out, stay out, OK now turn it in. Made all the difference in the world.

I didn't drag anything which on a bike like the bird means I wasn't exactly tearing it up but I did, however, improve greatly in smoothness. By the afternoon the lines were smoother, the downshifts were smoother, the jerk reopening the throttle was smoothed out to a pleasant little exhaust burble as the motor came off idle nice and smooth. The list goes on. I figure I'll just work on being smooth and the speed will come naturally.

All in all I can't think of anything short of an instructed track class that could be more valuable to developing your skills. Especially if you have someone experienced that is willing to take the time and drag you around for a few laps to show you how to do it right.

Also, have someone video tape you if you can. I got quite a bit of footage of my laps and it is very helpfull. I found myself noticing places where I got caught in the wrong gear or put myself out of position, etc. It's extremely instructive to see what it looks like when you're not on the bike.

And finally, there is no place better to see the old addage of 90% rider 10% bike proved than at the track. Jim, another guy from here in town that works at the honda dealer and races some, had a stripped down cbr600f2 as well as his prepped 900RR. About the third time he lapped some other guys on an R1 and a 2000 gixxer 750 on his f2 it became very clear.

I'm sorry for the length of this post. It was just such a great experience I can't wait to go again. Unfortunately, that will probably be next year.
 
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I have prepped my RC for the track. Safety wired vital components(brakes claipers, oil drain plug, oil fill cap, oil filter, axle pinch bolts). I haven't replaced the coolant with water and Water Wetter yet but I plan to soon. Most tracks/clubs require full leathers(2 piece if zipped together for most), DOT/Snell full faced helmet, gauntlet style gloves, above ankle leather boots.

Hey John,

Don't want to get off topic but , Why did you safety wire your bike ?? Do you Race the RC ??
 

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Speaking of safety wiring

The group that had the track reserved (we were guests) asked me to safety wire my ignition key when I came in to check my air pressure after the first few sighting laps. They all had their keys wired and pretty much nothing else except for the handfull of race bikes. Has anybody heard of this? What is the point?:confused:
 
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The reason why you safety wire stuff, is to prevent them from falling off (During a crash..or vibrations)... If you hit keys or a bolt in the middle of a turn while draggin a knee, It could be bad ! ..

I asked RCjohn why he was safety wiring everything cause I though he was doing this only for a track day ... If you start drilling holes in your bolts , The value of your bike drops!
So only drill holes if you are going to race the bike ... Actually you don't have a choice, you have to Safety wire everything If you race.. But you shouldn't have to just for a track day ...
 

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OK, I knew why you would safety wire things in general, I just had never heard of doing it to your iginition key. :eek:

Oh yeah, total carnage for the day was one lowside on a Triumph speed triple (the naked one with two headlights), and two highsides. One on about a '97 gixxer 750, and the other on a 2000 gixxer. The guy that highsided the '97 was pretty lucky because there's not a lot of room off the track where he went off. He went into the hay bales and tires pretty hard. It happened at about 80mph coming out onto the straight and he just got a little banged up. The bike ended up tumbling and was obviously totalled. The kicker was that it wasn't his bike. He brought a pretty cool old guzzi and his buddy let him borrow the gixxer for a few laps. I'll bet that was an interesting car ride home. The other two crashes happened in a first gear 30-35mph bender so the only things hurt other than cosmetics were egos. The gixxer was just a matter of too much gas in first gear but the Triumph actually hit his foot rest bracket and it unloaded the back tire and down he went. Time for some rearsets I think.

I read that article on smaller bikes and I can totally relate. I always find myself thinking that the XX is just too big to comfortably push my limits. Consequently, my learning curve is really slow because I have to progress so slowly and cautiously. I think it's time to take an EX500 or something to the track next time so I can push it a little more without fearing death or dismemberment.
 
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I read that article on smaller bikes and I can totally relate. I always find myself thinking that the XX is just too big to comfortably push my limits. Consequently, my learning curve is really slow because I have to progress so slowly and cautiously. I think it's time to take an EX500 or something to the track next time so I can push it a little more without fearing death or dismemberment.

Im the same way, I was even thinking an EX250 .. Here in Canada there is a school for 125GP bikes !! Next summer I want to sign up ...
 

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I haven't ever heard of wiring the ignition key either. With the FBF Ducati 748 race bike, we never wire the key and that was in the Formula USA 126HP class. :confused: It is probably not a bad idea if it is a street bike. That way you won't lose your key in a crash. The 748 had a pretty bad crash at Pikes Peak... destroyed the bike but the key was still there. ;)

Adam,

I don't currently plan to race the RC. I will do track days first to see. I safety wired the stuff for safety on the street too. I also hate using thread lock. It's a Navy Nuke thing I guess. :D I wired the front caliper brackets, oil filter, oil drain plug & the oil fill cap. I'm not doing the rotors and sprokets unless I actually do race the bike. I'm not terribly concerned with the drop in value. I don't think it would have much affect on the RC but the drilled bolts can also be relaced. :) The wiring is not necessary in most track day groups that I have research. Team Pro-Motion doesn't require it unless you ride in the upper two groups(if my memory serves me correctly). ;)

The safety wire really adds to the Poser value though. I've just got to get me some racing patches for my leather. :D:p
 

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RCjohn said:


The safety wire really adds to the Poser value though. I've just got to get me some racing patches for my leather. :D:p

King Poser has spoken! Everyone go get your safetywire and 20 teeny drill bits. And sunglasses for eye protection (optional).


I agree though. I have hesitated to do it for the reason of the value. My motor really vibrates bolts loose and I have already lost several bodywork bolts. The ones that are hidden underneath have been swapped to zipties, the fasteners of the gods!

[Edited by funksouljon on 10-27-2000 at 01:59 AM]
 

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birdman,

little bikes are fun on the track. there is nothing like passing a guy on this year's plastic fantastic on your little teeny-tiny, old-assed, p.o.s.

also i know a lot of guys who safetywire their key because they went to the track with the old bike and i didn't have it. and don't wanna start the new bike with a screwdriver too. :)

john,

you're right pro-mo only requires saefty wire and water for blue and black (aka the collarbone impaired :p)
 

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you can also use the headlamp tape from envision graphics, that looks good & you can leave it on after the track day.
 
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