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Discussion Starter #1
been riding for 3.5 months now (on an f3) and i'm finding it difficult to figure out how much i can really lean the bike. i've read posts that f3's can scrape pegs and so on, but i've been fairly conservative in the corners. something about being relatively new to riding and not knowing the limits of the bike make me take turns a bit cautiously, especially when i think 'if i lay the bike down on this turn i could end up in the oncoming lane or off the side of the road' i still have about 3/4" of what people call 'chickenstrips' on either side of the rear tire, if that means anything. i've taken the msf course and was dragging the pegs on the bike they gave us. (i believe that was a 125, and the pegs were pretty low to the ground)

so i'm thinking about taking my f3 to an empty parking lot and just go around in circles, to get more lean. is it possible to make a full circles scraping a peg on an f3, or would that be too much and run the risk of dumping the bike? i'd like to try that to have that as a maximum reference of how much i can lean the bike when i ride on regular roads.
also if anyone has any other parking lot drills that might help, or better drills to improve cornering confidence, i'd like to hear it.
 

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Your gonna have a hard time dragging pegs on that in a parking lot. I'd suggest, find a LONG sweeping corner, and just keep doing it over and over again. A little faster each time. Just look where you want the bike to go (which is probably farther away then your currently looking). Keep practising it, over and over. The bike tell you when its had enough. If you do touch down the peg, DON'T PANIC. If you dump the throttle, you'll most likely lowside. Just relax and keep trying.
 

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You need to read Twist of the Wrist books and get a lot of seat time on the road practicing riding techniques, not speed. As you get the techniques right, the speed will take care of itself. Forget scraping the pegs, especially in parking lots. The bike will only go as fast as you are comfortable riding it, and your comfort level will only be as good as your technique and experience. If you exceed your personal comfort level, you will likely crash the thing, regardless of where in the range of "the bikes capability" you are riding. At no time while you're riding should you be scaring yourself. If you are scaring yourself, you're going to crash.

If you practice going around in circles in a parking lot, it will improve your ability to go around in circles in a parking lot, a skill which has no practical use on the road and doesn't even simulate the real world of road riding. It won't teach you how to anchor yourself on the bike, to be light on the bars, to gauge proper corner entry speed, picking a workable safe line through the corner, where to pick up the throttle through the corner, etc. etc. Only education in proper technique (the books), and a lot of practice using that technique, will improve your riding ability.

A track school would be nice, too.

I assume you have good riding gear so if you do oops, you improve your chances of making it with minimal injury.

Get the books, practice, and then post with some more specific questions that may be encountered as you gain experience. Hope that helps.:)
 

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Dad said:
If you practice going around in circles in a parking lot, it will improve your ability to go around in circles in a parking lot, a skill which has no practical use on the road and doesn't even simulate the real world of road riding.
Damn Dad, you always say it more "fancy" than I can come up with. :)
 

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Parking Lots

Problem with those parking lots is those large oil slicks by cages and Harleys.


Thunderheart
 

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Not only the oil puddles, but unlike a street, a parking lot doesn't have a lot of traffic flowing over it to remove dust and fine gravel. This makes a lot a bad place to practice leaning. Better to do what Dad said, and pursue better riding through education, and also take Kevlar's advice about picking a particular corner, preferably one with a clear runoff, and become intimately familiar with it. Notice your entry speed, and SLOWLY increase it. A bike is like a piano, a lot of it is talent, but even more is practice.
 
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