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Discussion Starter #1
ok someone help....:eek: i've been riding for somewhat of a long time now...i have a 2004 600 F4i and i cant even get a power wheelie up....wut the f*ck...when im in 1st...i snap the throttle open, and my front tire just feels light (thats it) it doesnt really even leave the ground!:mad: :rolleyes: then i started to clutch it up in 1st a little and it comes up mabye 3-4 inces. and thats it! omg im gettting irritated...im taking it slow and not doing anything stupid but theres gotta be a better technique...? :confused: i dont really feel myslef pulling up on the bars? but when i concously try too, it doesnt really have an effect? it just feels like im pulling up on a 500 pound peace of metal....any tips and advice? should i be leaning far back on the seat? do i even need to pull up on the bars and just let the bikes power do it all?
thanks!
~Mike
 

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Not a stunter at all, but logic tells me that pulling on the bars of a 500lb piece of metal ain't gonna do sh*t. ;)

When you're clutching it up, what rev's are you hitting? I've read on here than anywhere between 6-12k should do it.

Practice and patience, mate. :thumb:





Oh, and don't forget to cover the rear brake. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i think i get it up to like 9....ish? do i need to give it more? when i slip the clutch...i'm in first, and when i "slip" it (let it out smooth but quick) do you then give it a lot of gas still? am i supposed to be leaning back when i try and do it?:confused: i dont want to give it to much gas and loop it after i slip it, but am i always supposed to be on the throttle pretty hard?

And....

should i get my rpms up to more around 12? that seems a little high doesnt it

Thanks!
~Mike
 

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Sorry, mate, can't help you any further except to say that should do a search of the forum. I'm sure you're not the first to encounter problems with learning to wheelie.

Good luck. :thumb:
 

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your bike is wanted by stunters everywhere, that bike is perfect.


In first gear...cruise about 30-35 mph, pull that clutch in, rev it a bit more (just do little increments until you get to the point you need) and slip it back out. It sounds like you know how to clutch it up, but the trick is having enough revs. MAKE SURE YOU'RE ON THE THROTTLE AFTER YOU CLUTCH IT UP; and apply as neccesary to keep it up.

I can be going 55 mph in first, and clutch it up to balance point so your starting speed isnt really critical, but slower speeds are easier (not below 25 when you're starting out with wheelies tho)

all it takes is practice.
 

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be careful

I have a 2000 R6, the 2nd gear is just about gone. in 1st the bike is real jerky when your clutch is slipped. I just gotta do it still.
 

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I have a 2006 R6, I usually pull the clutch in around 8k, grab a hand full of throttle, let off the clutch quickly and it pops right up. The trick is in the timing. Pull the clutch in and grab the throttle at the same time, and dont let off of the throttle. Make sure you are covering your rear brake too just in case, although on most 600's they are a little bit hard to flip.
 

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06Raven said:
.......although on most 600's they are a little bit hard to flip.
hahaha


and man, you're starting around 8k then popping it up? Start much lower in the RPM range and pop it up; easier to go farther and/or get balace point. my :2cents:
 

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I dont know anyone on a stock 600 that has flipped it. I know it can be done, which is why i said to cover the rear brake, you must have skipped over that part. I also dont care to hear about the million people you personally know, or "heard about" flipping their 600, there are horror stories for everything, they just arent always that likely.

Due to the yamaha exup system the throttle will not open fully under a certain rpm, so 8k is necessary, 6k can be done, any less and it comes up and goes right back down.
 

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Im trying this and having kinda the same problem on my bandit 600. I can get it up in first about 6 inches might of hit a foot today, rev to 6 slip to about 10 or 11 and it pops right up, not far but it sure comes up. Second is a pain in the butt, i can get it maybe an inch or two doing the exact same thing. Should i start with lower rpms? And would it be easier if i were standing?

I read somewhere that its easier to balance with your feet than your bottom but after seeing the video of that guy standing on his r6 and trashing it, im nervous to just go out and try standing
 

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You should learn sitting down, its a little jerky when you learn and standing up will throw you off balance. The most common problems when trying to wheelie are leaning forward, and closing the throttle. Instinctively you lean forward when the bike comes up, try to break that habit. Make sure when the front comes up you never stop giving it throttle, also cover the rear brake in case you get into trouble. Try to grab the clutch and hit the throttle at the same time, once you hear it rev a couple thousand, let off the clutch, that is the timing I have found to work the best. Other than that, just keep practicing, it will come.
 

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06Raven said:
I dont know anyone on a stock 600 that has flipped it. I know it can be done, which is why i said to cover the rear brake, you must have skipped over that part. I also dont care to hear about the million people you personally know, or "heard about" flipping their 600, there are horror stories for everything, they just arent always that likely.
No need to get defensive man. You said you know it can be done, so end of convo with that one. Btw: my best friend looped his 600 right next to me doing the same thing :) (sorry, had to tell)


06 raven is correct when he says that the first instincts of a new comer to wheelies is leaning forward, and closing the throttle. After you slip that clutch you need to be ON that throttle. Thats easy to figure out with practice (key word!). But just try to keep an eye on your posture when pulling the front end up because a lot of people tend to lean forward as soon as they get on it hard trying to get it up; which is good...because any motorcyclist knows to lean forward during harsh accel. Not wheelies tho! Keep it stiff, and sit a bit further back than your normal riding position.

COVER THAT REAR AND PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE!
 

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When learning to pop it up I also noticed it is scarier when you arent getting the front wheel up. Once the wheel comes up consistantly, it isnt nearly as jerky or scary. Just make sure to wear your gear and cover the brake.
 

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I would practice second gear clutch ups first. First gear is a lil touchy and you can loop the bike with ease. Be sure to cover the rear brake. After you get comfortable clutching it up to balance point you will then be able to modulate the wheelie with the back brake. It will take soem time to learn how to clutch the bike up perfectly each time. Too many people use only the throttle to control a wheelie. This is why you see a lot of people doing uncontrolable jerky wheelies. Your best bet is to have a friend videotape you so you can see how far you can get the front of the bike to go up. In my personal opinion slower wheelies are harder than faster ones. I am no where close to an expert with slow wheelies. I need a lot of practice, but when it comes to second gear 70mph stand ups I could prolly ride for miles. LOL. Be safe and wear your gear, and don't try to rush the learning process.
 
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