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Discussion Starter #1
Hello people!

Its been a while since I've visited this site. Been very busy last 3 months.

Anyhow, I've found this new riding spot here where I live. Twisty, no traffic, and well paved. I've had no problems except for this one turn. Its a nice 35-40mph left turn. Looks perfect but when you start leaning in to the turn you can notice that there's a small dip on the outside of the turn making the camber nonfavorable to lean on. I had a close call where the rear slid quite a bit when I leaned into the turn & stuck my knee out. The bike corrected itself. Thankfully I didnt panic and I kept the throttle open and let the bike do the work.

Now, every time I approach this turn, I get a little anxious, so I tend to just ride that part really really slow.

I've been trying to figure out how to tackle this problem and I can really use some advice.
 

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There are some turns where you're just not going to get the maximum speed/lean angle out of your bike...rules of the game. If it's not a "blind" corner, I'd say the simple solution is to stay towards the center of the lane if there's no traffic. Otherwise, either slow down or learn how to control the slide.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Otherwise, either slow down or learn how to control the slide.
:D I think I'll do the former not the latter. Sliding the rear was pretty nerve racking. Felt like my heart fell on the floor once it started.
 

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I slid the rear a couple times when I still had the wheels clad in Dunlop Qualifiers. Since I upgraded, haven't had a hint of traction loss. Maybe I'm just not pushing hard enough.

Good luck.
 

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Off camber turns bring the road closer to your bike, having the same effect as leaning the bike further on a streight road. So in essense, treat it like a tri arc turn which enters into one radius, then decreases into a tighter radius before opening back up into the wise radius. If that makes any sense at all, you'll see that you have a few options.

1. Double apex. Brake, apexing early, accelerate lightly with minor lean over the off camber part, before apexing again right after, and then accelerating on exit. This is probably the safest way.
2. Harder one. Late apex the shit out of it. Drop you speed some prior to entry, and enter with a minor lean from the outside. Go past the inside in a line that will throw you out to the outside about 2/3's thru the corner, where you brake, lean hard, and exit. This will most likely have you braking hard right over the cambered section, its tricky to accomplish, but its probably the fastest way thru.
3. Play around with your line. Perhaps there is a way to avoid the dip all together.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Double apex. thats what I've been doing. I've been going easy on the dip then apex again through the end of the turn and exit.

There's really no avoiding the dip, cause it makes the entire road surface on that part of the turn angled off camber.

As far as #2 goes, I thought about doing that, but I keep getting the idea that the front might wash out as soon as I ease on the brake on that cambered area. So I try not to do that. (I know, I'm a big wuss!!:twofinger)

So far, double apexing that area seems to work. Aggressive, but safe to execute. Its either that or I slow down and not lean so hard on the turn. Both have been working out so far since I havent had another close call since then!


Thanks for the tips!!!!
 

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On the street I'd definately double apex it and take it easy, you aren't chasing any laptimes or anything on the street. Always error on the side of caution.

On a racetrack I tend to late APEX a turn like that like Vash . Just to give you a example of how late I APEX theres this one turn at Gingerman (T3 actually a double apex) where my turn in point is the point where I feel like i'm going to run straight off the track. Then I lean it in as hard and as fast as I can. OK for the track but definately not for the street.
 

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If it were me, I would double apex it 90% of the time, but I would late apex it just enough to know I how I can get it done. As for front washing out fear, do it a few times going too slow, when you know its safe, then build up speed. Knowing how to brake in offcamber corners is helpful, but there is no reason to start full speed. Ussually, the front doesnt wash out right away, unless you are leaned waaay over. It lets out lots of noise, sometimes the bars turn, and the bike starts falling to the side. You got time to save it, but beware that if the bars get turn to the side there will be a pretty severe jerk when the front regains traction, so get on top of your bike.
 
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