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Discussion Starter #1
Well earlier this morning I went downstairs to start my bike up and head out to work. First problem I ran into was the ignition chamber was frozen so my key wasn't going in at all. No biggy, I just poured warm water into the chamber and worked the key in. Afterward i sprayed the key and the chamber with some wd-40 to get rid of the water( its about 19 degrees f. right now). Next, I close the choke(yzf 600r 05') all the way down to get a rich fuel intake and, after 6-8 trys my bike finally starts. So everything is goin good, bike is warming up, all the cables are free, tires aren't flat. Just as I was finishing inspection I find something that ruined my day just as fast as it was started: There was a HOLE in my muffler. Not on the Can part, but the part RIGHT before it goes into the can. It's a tiny, tiny hole. Almost like if you could take a ball point pen and just barely prick it. .5mm would be my guess. The reason I'm pissed is because a thin high pressure stream of LIQUID gas, not evaporated like the stuff coming out of the end of the can, is spewing out all over the ground. The second I notice the stream, I cut the choke so the engine drops down from 3000rpm to 1200rpm. The stream dies down to a light sprinkle at this rpm, but its still losing gas. When I realize that didn't do the trick I shut the bike off and took a look...

So now my question is: Can/should I fix this on my own somehow? And is this covered under my warranty? It better freakin be thats for sure! I'm gonna give my local dealer a call and see what they can do for me... Any help or advice would be awesome...Thanks guys....:crying: .....:(
 

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It should be covered under warranty.

However the problem seems strange. Hole in the muffler can be silver soldered, thats not a big deal, but there shouldnt be any gas there in the first place. Sounds like your engine got flooded somehow.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the quick reply Vash! Do you think it could have flooded when I was starting it up with the choke all the way closed? Would that send too much gas in the engine and cause it to leak? Should I try starting it again and see if it runs out? In a worse case scenario is it even safe to drive? Thanks once more for your help guys!
 

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Choke could've had something to do with it. To be honest I'm less than fluid in my understanding of carbs.
I'd wait for the bike to warm up in the sun and the fuel to evaporate. Worst case scenario (also not very likely) is that the fuel in the muffler will ignite and blow your muffler right off. Its not likely, but it does happen.
 

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Are you sure its gas and not water? If its the lowest point in the system it could be a condensation drain to prevent water from pooling and rusting your pipe.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's funny that you metioned that, because i just explained what happened to to my girlfriend a few minutes ago and her first thought was condensation. And one thing thats bothering me, How the hell did the hole get there in the first place? I drove it 2 days ago with no problems(i inspect my bike before and after EVERY ride). I put my bike cover on after i parked it and the next day(yesterday) it snowed and rained. So maybe it does have an exhaust hole to let let out condensation! I have never heard of this before but it seems very very logical! Well my lady is takin me to work now so I'll get back with you guys after i call the dealer dudes. Thanks for the advice!:thumb:
 

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So you're not sure if its actually gas?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hey guys! Good news maybe! On my way down to my girlfriends car i went over to my bike to lock it up and have one last glance at the problem. First thing i did due to Fast Glass's advice is smell the "liquid" and sure enough it doesn't smell like gas at all. In fact i'm gonna say it almost smells/feels like water. So i get dropped off at work and call the mechanic to see what he thinks. He said it is almost definetly a drainage hole for condensation and to let it run for a few minutes. He said it will eventually taper off and stop draining. If not, then there is still a big problem. So tonight I'm gonna check it out and see what happens. Fingers crossed!!!
 

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Water is much more likely to collect in the muffler. Its almost inevitable if your bike is parked outside.

You can also tell if the hole is intentional by the looks of it. A punchtured hole will have rough edges and the metal will be stretched around it. A rusted hole should have very irregular edges, while a punched (manufactured) hole will have a nice round shape, with maybe a minor burr.
 

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Definitely condensation. Definitely a hole placed there from the factory for just that purpose. Nothing wrong.

Ever notice how cars have condensation/steam coming out of the exhaust on real cold days, especially when first started or sitting in traffic? Water drops out the tailpipe? Same thing here.

Be extra careful to let the oil catch up in temp before to wind it up very far. The thick oil doesn't want to flow. At least twice the time it takes for coolant temp to register properly is what oil will take. Also, aside from road conditions, remember that tires are compounded for a minimum of fifty degrees or so for reasonable performance. They are not nearly as good in the extreme cold. Got to go easy on everything in cold weather.

Welcome to cold weather riding.:)
 

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matrixman said:
I just poured warm water into the chamber and worked the key in. Afterward i sprayed the key and the chamber with some wd-40 to get rid of the water(
I know that you're asking about your muffler, but what you said about your ignition caught my eye. In my humble opinion, the water/WD40 in the ignition is a really bad thing. You don't want moisture in that mechanism, which sounds like that may have been the reason it was froze-up in the first place. I know that the "WD" in WD40 stands for water dispersant but even so, it won't get rid of all the moisture and it's a pretty poor lubricant as well. The only thing (once again, in my humble opinion) that should be used to lubricate a lock (or ignition) is graphite. Other types of lubricants can build up and tend to trap dirt and other particles which eventually get the tumblers all jacked up. Just make sure it's nice & clean & dry in there beforehand.

Good luck and I hope the muffler thing aint no thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ever notice how cars have condensation/steam coming out of the exhaust on real cold days, especially when first started or sitting in traffic? Water drops out the tailpipe? Same thing here.
That makes PERFECT sense! I see that happen with cars almost everyday! Why didn't i think about that earlier! About the hole, when i was inspecting it, it looked like it was intentionally put there. It's also perfectly centered at the bottom most part of the pipe leading into the muffler. There is no way, even with me dropping my bike, that an object would have punctured it there.

I now recall that the last time I drove it a few days ago was in rain! After parking my bike for the night and locking it all up I let the muffler/engine cool off and put the cover on while it was still raining. Then, the next day it snowed and was below freezing most of the time. The water in my muffler had been frozen just beggin to come out!

Dad, thanks for the great weather advice about the tires and oil. This will be my third season in winter ( first 2 were on a 2003 honda elite 80cc scooter). The cold is nothing new to me, but this bike sure is, so I am gonna have to take it REAL slow and save the quick take-offs for spring time.

Oh and Humanzee thanks for the advice about the ignition thing. I figured it was a bad idea to do the water/wd-40 thing due to future build up problems. That's what I get for being in a hurry to get to work! Since this will surely happen again ( happened almost everyday with my scooter in the wintertime)do you think its safe using that "LOCK-MELT" stuff they sell in quick shops? It works on my car... Otherwise I'll just try the graphite lube stuff.

Thanks for the great advice everyone and for puttin up with my noob questions!:thumb:
 

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matrixman said:
Oh do you think its safe using that "LOCK-MELT" stuff they sell in quick shops? It works on my car... Otherwise I'll just try the graphite lube stuff. :

I'm afraid I've got no experience dealing with a frozen ignition. It rarely drops below freezing here and snow is less common than a confirmed bigfoot sighting. I would be willing to bet that if it's clean and dry, then it wouldn't freeze up. The metal and/or plastic parts won't freeze together without some sort of bonding agent. Water particles can freeze the parts together and some lubricants get gummy at low temperatures, binding things up. The graphite is a powder so that wouldn't be a problem, I'd just make sure the ignition is clean and dry before the graphite goes in or it will probably turn to mush.

Hopefully somebody here with sub-zero life experience can be of more help. If not, you can always move closer to the equator.
 

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Consider using some sort of alcohol (methanol, ethanol, or some other organic solvent) It should drop the freezing temperature of water, freeing your lock, all the while not rusing anything.

But honestly, I dont think water will hurt the ignition much. Everything there is made to be stored outdoors, which means using metals that wont rust, and covering the electrical connections so that they cannot short out.

If you have a harley, disregard the preceding paragraph. The boys in milwaukee have not figured out the trick of using rust proof materials on their bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If you have a harley, disregard the preceding paragraph. The boys in milwaukee have not figured out the trick of using rust proof materials on their bikes.
:thumb: Good lookin out Vash. I'll remember that when I buy my next Harley...oh wait, I like real motorcycles, not rusty noisy figurines that break down after a few runs.:twofinger
 

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My roommate got a sportster.. is an '00 and everything on it is showing signs of corrosion. every bolt (literally, including the ones that hold the engine together) the spokes, calipers, axles, axle nuts.... Its insane... The only thing rusing on my bike are the crush washers on the brake lines and they are aftermarket...
 

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Not necessarily your bike of your suspected problems. Still the condensation hole just before the muffer is also whey we try to tell new riders (I do not know about people that "drive" a m/c--must be another breed or do not use the m/c language for you do not "drive" a horse or drive a bicyle--you "ride" a bicycle, m/c & horse , for you drive a buggy, cage of four wheel self balanced things with four wheel .LOL) to not make short runs, but enough to get all the condensation out of the pipe(s).

The ignition key should NOT be iced up, unless you allowed something to saturate it in freezing weather. Possibly a cover over the bike that was wet inside. You might still find some bikes with the ignition key tucked down the side & not exposed. Because of the fear of water getting into the ignition key & worst yet was ice.

I remember some of the Honda bikes, like the Honda CB350F of '64 still had the ignition key at the very front & just under the petrol tank like so many previous bikes & again I burned my non-gloved left hand when I reached down & touched a HOT header pipe in the bike I was testing for a m/c mag & THAT was one of the CON things about the bike. Way back then & some yrs prior I had a Pros & Cons bit. No other m/c mags had that or anything like it & they all followed once they saw it made sense.

In fact the next bike was upped to 400cc rather then 350cc, six instead of five speeds, ignition key on top, flat bars, & the most attractive/shaped header pipes plus some other things I mentiond. Sort of proof that even Honda must have read my test.

Still in cleaning my '97 Yamaha YZF600r or the other two bikes I do all I can to NOT allow any water close to the electrics & especailly the ignition key.
 

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Too late for this go but, don't wash your bike with the key in the ignition. Depresses that tin shield that tends to deflect water and instead, serves as a funnel to fill it. A little WD-40 won't hurt but shouldn't be required regularly.

I wouldn't have poured water in there myself because it will take longer to dry out than the time it takes to re-freeze if it's really cold. If the WD-40 can was in the house and at least at room temperature, it probably would have had enough heat to thaw the lock as well as prevent a re-freeze. Just some thoughts.
 
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