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Well my name is Nick, I'm 20 and from South FL. The itch to get a sport bike has been getting progressivly worse over the last year. I've always said I'd love to ride but would never let myself consider it because it was way too dangerous. But Ive become more and more curious lately and tonight I began searching on the internet to see if I could find out if it was really as "deadly" as parents and other non-bikers make it out to be. I kind of figure it all depends on the riders judgement on where and how to ride the bike. Well my questions are as follows:

1)Just how dangerous is sport biking and is this percieved danger created mostly by the actions of a few irresponsable riders?

2) Where can I find out about safe riding practices i.e.-defensive driving, classes, lessons, technical aspects(steering, cornering, braking, etc.), websites?

3) Any personal experiences with accidents you would be willing to share and the lessons they taught you (how to avoid in the future).

4) Good beginner bikes......preferably under $3,000

5) Good websites for general information on sportbikes

Thanks in advance for the advice and help.

nick
 

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Welcome

chameleonv said:
1)Just how dangerous is sport biking and is this percieved danger created mostly by the actions of a few irresponsable riders?

2) Where can I find out about safe riding practices i.e.-defensive driving, classes, lessons, technical aspects(steering, cornering, braking, etc.), websites?

3) Any personal experiences with accidents you would be willing to share and the lessons they taught you (how to avoid in the future).

4) Good beginner bikes......preferably under $3,000

5) Good websites for general information on sportbikes

Thanks in advance for the advice and help.

nick
1) I will be honest with you sportbikes can be dangerous. I almost died from an accident back in November. I was cut off so it wasn't my fault. If I had the extra metal around me perhaps nothing would have happened, or it could have been worse. I am a responsible rider so that helped. I also was wearing a helmet and full leather suit.

2) Check out the Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses. I forget the link, but someone will post it.

3) Same as question 1. I have had a total of 6 downs. I learned from the first 4 how to handle gravel. No. 5 was stupidity (Don't ride tired) No. 6 was not my fault and I lost my memory from that incident so no lesson there. I did decide the bike was going to be a weekend toy from now on though.

4) A 600 older model CBR maybe or try the EX 500

5) This one!

Welcome to the site and good luck
 

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Welcome to the forums, Nick! Definitely look into the MSF course that Robert provided the link for. I took that one in Homestead when we were living in Miami (not sure how far south you are) and it taught me a lot. I've been down twice, both minor incidents, both my fault and I definitely learned from them. My biggest fear is other folks doing stupid things. Gear is very important. I didn't have proper gear in my first wreck and dislocated my shoulder and scuffed up my skin pretty well. Now, I wear all my gear pretty much all the time and my second crash was much worse and I came out totally uninjured, except for general soreness for a couple days and injured pride. I think you'll find all sorts of information on these forums. There is a search feature that you can really benefit from. Welcome and good luck with whatever you decide!! :D
 

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As you said, sportsbikes can be dangerous, and it does depend on the rider. If you go and purchase an R1, and go and ride like a maniac, for sure you're going to hurt yourself :)

However, with the right education and self discipline riding can be very safe and rewarding. What have you got on your side? Well a sportsbike has a very small frontal area (can fit into small gaps!), awesome acceleration (good for getting out of tight spots), excellent brakes (if you know how to use them to their maximum), and they are very agile. You'd think from that that you'd be one of the safest vehicles on the road.
However, you have only two wheels, and you're anything but travelling in a straight line and one of these stops spinning, you're probably going to have a "get off".

Newbie riders often perceive that riding a motorbike is all about physical motor skills. Actually this is only a small portion of what it takes to be a safe rider. A car has a cage, you have your brain. This is your primary defense against an accident. It's about knowing what your bike is doing and why, AND being able to spot a potential accident before it occurs.

An example of this: your riding down a sidestreet coming up to a slow moving car. At this point alarm bells should be ringing in your head. A prudent riding will be asking "why is this car going so slow?". A squid will just get annoyed, open the throttle and attempt to overtake the slowcoach infront of him/her. At the point at which the bike is too close to the car to stop, the car will then pull a u'ee without indicating, and the rider will slam straight into the car.

I had an accident very similar to this a couple of years ago. Only problem was that it was a bit harder to spot than the above accident. The car had just pulled out of a gas station and was accelating slowly. I came up in the other lane, and at the last minute, bang, this car pulls directly infront of me (doing a u'ee). No way I could have stopped. I was lucky to get away with only a broken arm considering I hit the car in the drivers side door (ie in the cage). Lesson learned: RIDE DEFENSIVELY. It does not matter whose fault the accident was - I still got hurt.

I've gone on a bit, but I think you get my point(s). Never stop learning, always leave yourself an out, and ride defensively. It may never be as safe as driving a cage, but you only live once right?

Safe riding!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I just wanted to thank everyone for their comments and experiences.......I'm definately going to look into the courses when Im getting ready to purchase a bike. One thing I picked up from most of the posts, is that yeah it is definately dangerous, you there are things you can do as a rider to minimize the danger. And right on Dave!!... you only live once, and any chance to escape the monotony of everyday life is worth a little risk.

Thanks everyone for the input,

nick
 

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Here you go

You definately want to avoid that title. A "squid" is named after the animal, squid. When a squid (animal) moves, they shoot off fast and then slow down and turn then take off fast again. You will see riders referd to as "squids" do the same thing. The name also covers those that are stupid on the bikes.
 

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Nick.
Welcome, first of all.
Secondly. It is a very dangerous hobby. But if you ride with your brain in the ON position then you can minimize the risks. Remember there are only 2 kinds of motorcycles.
And third, this has to be the most rewarding hobby/lifestyle one can get into. It must be if so many people say it can be as good or better than sex?
 

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Welcome. :cool:

It is a somewhat dangerous hobby but the dangers can be minimized.

Always wear proper attire. I'm not saying that I always wear leathers(it is best though) but wear sturdy long sleeves, full length pants, gloves, over ankle leather shoes and good helmet.

The most important rule I follow is:

ALL CARS ARE OUT TO KILL YOU!!(especially young girls on cell phones)

This has been a good rule for me. I have about 30-35K miles on sportbikes over the last five years and haven't gone down yet. **knocking on wood**
 
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