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Discussion Starter #1
I've been thinking about getting a sport bike recently, and could your use
opinions about owning a motorcycle in general.

I suppose owning a motorcycle isn't the most "practical" thing in the world, at least in terms of storage capacity. But I can't resist. While it may put me at a disadvantage for driving a bunch of friends around, I do plan to move to NYC in a year or so and wouldn't exactly need a car (i.e. parking would be a definite bitch, not too mention the traffic). something smaller, quicker and more fuel efficient would help. I could always attach panniers to a bike, couldn't I?

my other worries include the rumors you hear about people talking about motorcycles as though you'll die the moment you hop on one. I know they're incredibly powerful (and fun!) machines that must be respected, but I don't exactly plan on busting out wheelies and sport bike tricks. Sport touring
would be fun though, but, of course, gotta work on handling skills before really trying out a bike. also, bikes are a thousand times more responsive than cars, which means you could potentially get yourself out of bad situations/potential accidents easier than a clunky car, or am I wrong about this?

another concern is that of course we don't have the beautiful weather of california. Is it worth it to own a sportbike in pittsburgh? I also want to be able to use the bike to go to work. do any of you guys use your bike as your primary means of transportation? if so, lemme know how it works for you for getting to school/work/where you need/want to go.
I know it'd be less 'pleasant' to ride in the winter, although you can buy goretex suits, right?
my other interest in getting a sport bike is, of course, speed B-)
--within limits though. my road bike is a ton of fun, but can't compare to the speed/ versatility of a sport/super bike.

I've read some reviews and talked to some friends of mine (who used to ride sportbikes) about starting out with a 600cc bike. I've read that some say they're too powerful, while others disagree. While I haven't ridden a motorcycle before (I have ridden on them, for fun, and for photographing pro cycing races like the Tour de Toona), I do have a plenty of experience racing my road bike around corners, through the pouring rain and all over washington, pa and into WV too. My handling skills are pretty good on my road bike, which doesn't exactly have as much tread touching the pavement as a sportbike. will this experience help me at all or put at an advantage starting out on a sportbike?
I've crashed in the past as well, and know how to fall (although it's the last thing i'd want to happen). i've even crashed going 35 down banksville rd on my road bike--stupid truck pulled out in front of us, forcing me to clip my bro's wheel. i smacked my head (cracked my helmet) and, surprisingly, flipped over and landed on my feet w/o really a rip in my jersey... not that this compares to crashing on a sportbike, but that, well, road rash isn't entirely foreign to me.
anyway, i'm very interested in buying a 2004 R6. would you guys say this is a bad choice? should I buy a car instead as my primary means of transportation, or should I buy something beautiful than can really go VROOOOM! ??

let me know what you think.

thanks,

~James
 

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i didnt read yoru whole post but what caught my eye is you want to get a new Rsix. i wouldnt do it for the first bike. youll be very sad when you total the bike out by pratically doing nothing at all. i woudl get a older bike and learn on that before stepping up to the newest shit out there
 

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If you're looking for practical, a motorcycle is not really what you want. I would also probably not recommend the brand new R6 you're looking at, for a couple of reasons. While I don't think starting on a 600 is bad in all cases, I do think starting on a brand spanking new one is. Mostly because the statistics are against you in that as a new rider you will probably drop the bike while learning. Goodbye shiny new plastics. Also, if you are moving to NYC, a brand new R6 would make an excellent target to be stolen.

It's been my experience that the people who tell you that you will die for simply looking at a bike pretty much don't know anything about them. Their knowledge of bikes amounts to being able to correctly point at and identify one 8 or 9 times out of 10. Politely thank them for their opinion, and proceed to think for yourself. :)

As far as it being worth it, well that's something you have to decide for yourself. How much enjoyment does it bring vs. how much it costs and how much you get to use it. Answer that and you'll know. Many people in your area find it well worth it, and in spite of the shorter riding season they still pull upwards of 10,000 to 20,000 miles a year. Location is not always the deciding factor, I knew people in California with 5 year old bikes with less than 500 miles on them....not even made it to the dealers suggested break-in mileage yet. If you decide to ride in the winter, which I personally would suggest against, realize that it's more than just getting a warmer suit. Road conditions can make a nice winter ride go horribly wrong in a hurry. Also you will spend a lot of time cleaning your bike from all of the road grime and salt kicked up in winter. I personally don't even ride in rain if I don't have to.

Your road bike experience may help a little in that you understand the concept of countersteering, balance at slow speed (though the weight difference doesn't allow for much of a comparison), and you have a healthy respect for dumping a bike at speed. That being said, you will still have a mountain of learning to tackle.

I would recommend buying a car as the primary transportation, with the bike coming when you have the money for it. I used my bike as my primary tranportation when the weather allowed, but always had my car to fall back on. In the event that one or the other had to go it'd be bye-bye to the bike.

Before you do anything, sign up for and take the MSF course. Hope this helped a little bit. :2cents:
 

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Do not get a bike!!! If you need transportation and it is going to be the only transportation you have....forget it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
hmmm...

well, in NYC, technically, you can get along quite fine w/o a car or bike. nonetheless, I think having a bike for fun--and to use as transportation when I need it (and when the weather's permitting)--would be nice.

to the people that recommended against buying a new bike for the following reasons:

1) i'll probably lay it down/drop w/o really doing anything at all, and waste a ton of $ buying new plastics,

2) it'd probably get stolen very easily.



for the first point, wouldn't bar & frame sliders essentially eliminate the risk of damaging the frame by dropping the bike or laying it down as the result of simple mistakes? I've read a number of posts about people sliding their bikes at 45mph + and note really accruing any significant damage.

for the second point, they do make bike alarm/anti-theft devices, of course. they seem pretty effective to me. for instance, I could purchase a disc brake lock, armored-link cable locks, a helmet lock (http://motorcyclecity.com/Parts/security.htm) and paging alarm system/ or one that prevents the bike from starting up at all (http://www.motorcyclealarm.net/), or just buy a GPS tracking system for it (http://www.cycletrak.com/) ??

still think i shouldn't get a new bike?

thanks for your input; i appreciate it.

~James
 

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SilverBlue82 said:




for the first point, wouldn't bar & frame sliders essentially eliminate the risk of damaging the frame by dropping the bike or laying it down as the result of simple mistakes? I've read a number of posts about people sliding their bikes at 45mph + and note really accruing any significant damage.

not always.
 

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yea pat is good example frame sliders dont save the bike when it hits the guard rail. they only save the motor and frame. if htey are longer enought they might save the plastics from getting fucked up but they wil lstill have scratches.
 

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You obviously have all the answers figured out already, so why ask people what they think??? Where are you going to park it.....on the street exposed to the elements. No disk lock or alarm is going to deter a thief.....most common way to steal a bike...4 dudes with 2 2x4's and a van....pick it up...load it into the van.....drive away. I am sure if they are smart enough to figure out how to steal it, they are smart enough to go right to the source of where the GPS locator will be installed.......also you need to know the bike is gone to get that tracked and by the time you find out, the bike will probably be in parts and for sale on ebay. You obviously got your mind set on it, so just go ahead and buy it and be sure to come back and report when the things mentioned happen, so we can say I told ya so!!!!
 

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Having been an avide Road Biker (cyclist 4K/yr & 25lbs ago), a bicycle is nothing like a motorcycle. yes they both have wheels, but once you drive a motorcycle past 30mph there is no equal handling comparison.

First take the MSF Course, if you don't, don't even talk to us. The course teaches you alot more than the skills of riding, it teaches you about the other idiots on the road.

If it is your first bike, it will fall down. Let me repeat, it will fall down even if its just in your driveway. Oh, plastic is expensive.

Get leather & a good helmet, it is alot cheaper than skin.

If you have enough sense & put 3000 -5000 miles on it before you start to push yourself.

Don't let anyone stop you from buying the bike that you want. If you want a bike, get a bike that you want. You'll be much happier than driving a POS.

All bikes are much faster than cars to 60mph
 

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Discussion Starter #14
shit,

no need to be an ass :finger: about things (i.e. "take the MSF course; if you haven't, don't talk to us.")....

ok, ok. I get the idea that your first bike will get messed up, so better to buy a used one. :thumb:


maybe i'm really just looking for reasons as to why you guys love to ride (and what you think the sport has to offer to others interested in it)--especially given the piece of shit weather___and, I speak for great experience__the total asshole drivers in pittsburgh that try to run you off the road, swear at you while driving in the completely opposite lane :cussing; , and bunch of other bullshit. maybe this only goes for cyclists, but I know that motorists in other places, such as san francisco, seattle, san diego etc. aren't such assholes to cyclists. I hope they're not asses to bikers everywhere.

so, to repeat, what makes you love to ride so much in face of the shitty weather and the bullshit anyone who's not on 4 wheels has to put up with in pittsburgh?


in conclusion,



:finger: all the idiot drivers out there. they can kiss...my ass :moon: .

~James
 
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