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I'm really psyched about getting my first bike but most of the bikes recommended for newbs are... well ugly. I went to beginnerbike.com and the Aprilia RS50 caught my eye. I'll be completely honest though, I know little to nothing about motorcycles so when I saw the 50cc displacement i was a bit shocked... is this bike a go cart with a pretty shell or is it something I can actually learn on and ride around (highway safe?)

Thanks in Advance for the Help
 

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With a 50cc motor, you're probably looking at having about 5bhp at the rear wheel..I reckon it would barely pull the skin off a custard.
I currently have a 250 and I find it a little annoying when it comes to highway riding. Redlined in 4th it will do about 140kph, and 5th is an overdrive. This is a bike that dynos at 26hp at the rear tyre.
I'd set your sights a little higher, especially if you get onto open highway. People often pull stupid passes on anything even a fraction under the speed limit.
Id rather kill myself on a big bike, than get killed on a small one;)
 

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My first bike was Ninja 500. Had plenty of guts to get me out of bad situations, but didn't have all the guts of, say, a Gixxer, F4i, or R6. You'd actually be surprised how much 100cc's difference makes. It was a good bike to learn on, IMHO, 'cause it was heavy to steer and made you concentrate in the corners. May have not been the prettiest thing, but it had two wheels.

I wouldn't suggest the Apprilla 50cc model, 'cause

A) you'll be bored of it in no time

B) Just not enough ponies to power out of bad situations

C) You can pick a 2000 or 2001 Ninja for about the same price that you'll pay for that Apprilla. Knew a kid that owned one as his first bike, and I paid $500 more than her did. Both ours were brand new. Remember with Apprilla, you're paying for a name as well as a bike. I've got a 2002 F4i now, and I'm glad I got that Ninja to learn on. Makes me respect the F4i a lot more than what I probably would have without having ridden something smaller.

And take the MSF course. It'll teach ya loads about riding that you'd probably never learn on your own. Just remember to take things slow and not try to keep up with the guys that have been riding for years. Just because they can push their Gixxer 750 or CBR 954 thru a turn at triple digits doesn't mean you're going to be able to. Ride to ride and not pose. Know your limits, instead of the bike's, and be safe.
 
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