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Discussion Starter #1
So my neighbor's little brother had a bike for sale, and it happened to be an 89 Suzuki Katana 600 in great condition. Except he had just messed up the transmission (due to a misshift). It wont get into first or second, and I haven't even tried to ride it yet. I got the bike for 600 w/helmet. I think it was an awesome deal, and have really wanted a bike, but don't know much about working on them. I have worked on a lot of my cars, mostly honda's, so I figure it wont be too hard to get the hang of it.

My questions specific questions are?

Does anyone have a recomendation as to where I should buy parts for my bike? (I need a transmission, or the parts to rebuild it)

What service manual have you had the best experience with? (On cars the Hanes manual sucks, so I was wondering if it was any different for bike's)

Thanks to anyone in advacne for any help you can give, it is greatly appreciated.
 

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S370HSSV 0773H
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7,434 Posts
As far as manuals you should be able to get the manufacturer's at any dealer. I've heard others use the Clymer's manuals. I don't know which is better. :dunno:

I'd make sure what exactly is wrong before ordering parts to rebuild a transmission. You never know, it could be something really minor and easy to repair. Get the manual before anything else. :2cents:

Also, look into taking the MSF course.

www.msf-usa.org

Good luck, and congrats on the bike! :thumb:
 

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I love the manufacturer's model / year specific manuals, and hate the Clymers. Clymers cover too many makes over too many years, IMO. (Especially in regard to a complicated task, like tranny work.)

Spicersh is right about making sure what the problem is. It could be something as simple as a gear selector on the inside of the tranny coming loose, or being stripped, or such.
 

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Strength and Honor
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6,143 Posts
Better late than never :confused:

My Clymer's is good for some things the manufacturer's wasn't, and vice versa. So, check them both out for the task at hand and buy the one that seems most specific/detailed.

I buy most of my stuff on Ebay or bike-specific forums and have yet to have any issues. Therefore, I'd recommend that route first. The dealer is a second option, but always costs more. There's always Partsfish which makes finding the parts you want easier. I also have some microfiche of the bike components which comes in handy.

As sh noted, be sure to get into a MSF course. Its the quickest way to become informed about street bikes and can typically ease the licensing process.
 
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