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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just moved to the San Diego area for college, and I'm thinking about selling my car (which is back with my parents in Philly), and buying my first bike. From the minimal research I've done, I have quite a few questions.

1. I was told to start by taking a motorcycle safety course, and I wanted to know what that costs and what's involved. (I already have a phone number to call)
2. What cc bike should I start with for my first bike? I don't want anything that has too much power.
3. What does the insurance run for an 18 year old with a clean record on say a 600? Any good insurance companies?
4. Anybody use a radar detector on their bikes?
5. How hard is the maintenance on most bikes, and how many miles do they usually last for?

I also have questions about riding that I haven't the slightest clue about since I've only been a passenger.
1. In a car, if you push too hard in a corner, you get under or oversteer, and you usually easily recover from this. What happens on a bike? I mean is there a point wher you loose traction and can easily recover or is it like one second your carving corners on your bike, the next your sliding sideways on your ass?
2. When you do a burnout on a bike, are there several different ways to do it as in a car? Lock front brakes, rev it , dump the clutch? Do you keep your feet planted on the pavement? I've seen bikes run at the racetrack when I run my car, but like I said, I've never ridden.
3. What's the whole thing about squid/squiddy?
4. How bad do the usual rookie spills hurt?
5. How do you pop a wheelie and ride it?

Any and all help is much appreciated.

Thanks,
Scott

Also- Do you guys take checks for your t-shirts?

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98 Mustang GT - x-pipe, springs, rack bushings, cat-back exhaust, K&N, clear corners, etc.
Bike - none yet

[This message has been edited by ITisURturn (edited September 25, 2000).]

[This message has been edited by ITisURturn (edited September 25, 2000).]

[This message has been edited by ITisURturn (edited September 25, 2000).]
 

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ok.. my suggestion... do a seach on this site about wheelies.. burnouts.. squids.. and ur other questions...this may help ya. it helped me... as far as a first bike.. id say 500cc or maybe a 600..one without all the expensive plastics like a seca II not sure about cc's on that bike though.. believe me you will drop ur bike.. even though you say oh i wont drop my bike i am extra carefull.. belive me u will drop it..also id buy a bike that is a couple of years old but maintained well... i made the mistake of buy my first bike new and now im tryin to sell it.. its not sellin for what i need it to. i guess you could say i made a squidly mistake.. but u live and learn. well its really late and i think ive rambeled enough.. thats just my .02 take it for what its worth

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'99 gsxr 750 with some nice scratches on the left side oops lol
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ITisURturn:

4. How bad do the usual rookie spills hurt?

Wicked Bad! :D Just kidding, wear the right gear (helmet, gloves, good boots, and a motorcycle jacket w/armor) and it might not be too bad.

5. How do you pop a wheelie and ride it?

I think this guy is gonna fit right in around here. Welcome to the forum, if the search feature was back up and working that would have been a good idea...o well.

Just make damn sure that when you go party, the bike stays at home.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

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"When it rains, we all get wet, the Pope and the prostitute"-Santana

[This message has been edited by RUG BURN (edited September 26, 2000).]
 

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Welcome aboard bro. I am about 2 miles
from Philly as I type this. The course you
want to take is the MSF course. I don't know
the cost in CA - In PA it's free, in NJ it's
$180... so on and so fourth. Someone from CA
will have to answer that.

As far as first choice of bikes, I totally
agree with the previous post. Don't buy
new if you can avoid it. You probably will
have a learning expirience or tWo and a new
bike will make recovering from it a little
more difficult. Spills happen - sometimes
you get lucky, being smart helps this,
sometimes you don't. The less fairing the
better.

As far as losing traction, you can slide
and get away with it. Usually you can get
away with sliding the rear end controllably
(though this takes alot of practice and I
wouldn't recommend trying it until you've
done alot of riding and also reading a good
book like 'Twist of the Wrist'). The front
end is another story, though on a track you
predictably slide that slightly also. These
are all experts techniques however.

Insurance in CA - No idea.

Radar dectors do help - not a bad idea.

Burnouts are expensive, bike tires don't last
long at all. You can do them standing still
fairly easy with the front brake on and
fanning the clutch. You can also do them
while you are moving though again - this can
be tricky and is more of an advanced trick.

Don't get ahead of yourself - In the beginning
just simply riding in traffic is a full time
job. You really need to be very very aware.

Good luck on finding a bike, and ride safe!

Did I just say that? :D

Chris


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I really should be working...

[This message has been edited by chris_y2k_r1 (edited September 26, 2000).]
 
G

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Hey Its not my turn , But anyways...

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>3. What's the whole thing about squid/squiddy?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Answer:
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Anybody use a radar detector on their bikes?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>When you do a burnout on a bike, are there several different ways to do it as in a car?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>How do you pop a wheelie and ride it?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



You better start on a moped ! :D


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Watch out where those Huskies go , Don't you eat that yellow snow ....


Adam
 

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I am also relatively new to riding. So I can kind of fit into your shoes. In my opinion....do NOT buy a 500 cc bike. I bought a '00 ZX6R and am very pleased with it. Buying a 500, I think you will get tired of it very fast. There is a definite period of getting used to the bike, but I fell like you will be much better going with a 600 cc bike. And like one of the previous posts.....don't buy anything new. I dropped my 6R after 2 weeks. Damn near thought I would puke. Bike rides great still, but fairing damage is expenseive as $H!T !!
Best of luck and be safe.

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John Lankford
2000 ZX-6R
Hampton, VA
[email protected]
 

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Buying used is really good advise because your expected to drop at least your first bike. I wouldn't worry about the wheelies, stoppies, backfireing ;) , you know all the kool squidly sh*t. Right now, unless you would like to ask one more question: How do I increase my risk of death within the first six months? I'd just focus on the basics and read Twist of the wrist 2. Some very good information in there that will give you a beter understanding of the world your stepping into. Good Luck, may the force be with you. BTW- get a 600 and use a little common since, anything less is for the sissy minded :D

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John
http://photos.yahoo.com/jk6672
 

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"....do NOT buy a 500 cc bike."
"anything less is for the sissy minded"

There ain't a damn thing wrong with buying an under 600cc bike, especially for a beginner. You'll get all the bike you can handle in an EX500, GS500, Bandit 400, FZR 400, etc. You'll learn to ride better, faster, and safer without high maintenance, high cost of body parts, and cheaper insurance. Plus 'if' you do out grow it, they're easy to upgrade. C'mon, unless you need to prove your manhood, don't get crazy for a 600+ as a first bike. Especially if you've never ridden before. :D

my $.02

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the reverse side always has a reverse side-
japanese proverb
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by nitro6R:
I am also relatively new to riding. So I can kind of fit into your shoes. In my opinion....do NOT buy a 500 cc bike. I bought a '00 ZX6R and am very pleased with it. Buying a 500, I think you will get tired of it very fast. There is a definite period of getting used to the bike, but I fell like you will be much better going with a 600 cc bike. And like one of the previous posts.....don't buy anything new. I dropped my 6R after 2 weeks. Damn near thought I would puke. Bike rides great still, but fairing damage is expenseive as $H!T !!
Best of luck and be safe.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

yeah those little bikes are for sissies.

i pulled some numbers off the lrrsracing.com homepage related to laptimes at the sept 2-3 races. maybe you'll see how dumb small bikes are

expert times--top 2 lwss and highest ex500 i saw
jeff wood--best lap--77.641--tz250
brian kent--best lap--78.8.36--sv650
sherry landry--best lap--81.561--ex500

expert winner--hwsb
geo. tarricone--best lap--74.777--gsx-r750

amateur--winner--lwgp
thomas barry--best lap--82.615--hawk 650
last place--best lap--105.206--cbr400

amateur--hwsb
eric reilly--best lap--79.514--cbr600
last place--best lap--109.625--zx600

i think the last place numbers are very telling. the 600 is a harder bike to ride. i don't mean to dog these guys in last, they are trying, and the guy on the 400 will be up a position next week :) i'll be there.

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Tony

the views and opinions expressed by tony (cbrf2boy) are the ramblings of a total idiot. sbw.com, it's administrators, moderators, and members don't necessarily agree with and are not responsible for anything this idiot has to say.

for more ramblings try cbrf2boy

[This message has been edited by cbrf2boy (edited September 27, 2000).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Where can I pick up a copy of Twist of the Wrist?

Also, I'm not asking questions about the squidly sh.t because I'm gonna go right out and try it (I prefer my ass cheeks intact as well as my othr parts), but I just wanted to know what's involved-the process. How do I search the page? I couldn't find a search option.

Some bikes that I've been told to check out are R6, 600R, and the Ninja. Any other suggestions? I really like the R6. I wouldn't be buying a bike for almost a year though.

Is it bad to buy a used bike that's already been dropped? If I'm gonna drop it anyways, I might as well get one with some minor scratches at a better price.

Also, why do they race 250cc racing bikes if a 600cc sreet bike is middle of the road on the street?

~Scott

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98 Mustang GT - x-pipe, springs, rack bushings, cat-back exhaust, K&N, clear corners, etc.
Bike - none yet
 

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I really don't meen that if you ride less than a 600 your a sissy. What I should of said was that I've known a few guys that have bought a 500 and were kickin themselves in the butt a few months later, because there skills improved and wanted more bike than they had, but where stuck with that 500 because they bought it new or paid to much for the bike and couldn't get out from under it for a while. I think if you are responsible enough to slowly grow and nurture your riding skills and don't let the bike go to your head, become cocky and think you can do/handle any situation on the road, you will be just fine. You ride over your skills and your just asking for a faces of death situation. I'll be honest, my first bike I owned was a R1, not a whole lot of experience under the belt, but it wasn't the first I've ridden and I wasn't clueless about riding. IMO the bike is very forgiving, but will let you know in a heartbeat if you screw up. That's why I don't think a 600 is a bad bike to start with, and it dosen't have to be a R series bike.

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John
http://photos.yahoo.com/jk6672
 

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Ill second or third the notion of avoiding a 500cc. I know its politically incorrect but i dont care. It is my humble opinion that 80% of the new riders will rapidly get bored with their 500 and want something bigger in very short time. This is not to say that an EX500 or bandit is not a great beginner bike, but i think a 600 is a safe bet for balancing bike with rider and the "boredom factor" which you very well may run into with a smaller bike.

my first real sportbike was a 600 and i am SO glad i didnt get a 500 (which i considered), i now know that i would have kicked myself for getting a bike any smaller. The 600 worked out perfectly, running on the verge not being enough bike, but never crossing that line.



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Fear Green.
 

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Unless I missed it, you didn't give any indication of your height and weight. I know it's kind of personal but it should be considered. ;) If you are of average or taller/heavier size then I also would recommend staying away from smaller than 600. But I would caution you to avoid the R6 or 6R if buying new. They are relatively easy to ride except for a beginner. The Yamaha YZF600R is a damn good starter bike for someone with a little size and self discipline with the trottle.

One of the best bargains out there and a great starter bike is the Suzuki SV650. No bodywork to damage if it falls over. :cool: It is a blast to ride in the twisties and is quite comfortable. :) Also, in tight twisties it will outrun almost every bike mentioned so far. :eek:

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John

"If Harley made an airplane... would you fly in it?"
 

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Glad to see the different views on 500 cc and 600 cc bikes. In my experience, there is a timid feeling once you start to ride, especially the very first time. This eventually goes away.....(although you should never think that YOU are totally in control).... I have found my 6R to be very forgiving, especially for the type of 600 that it is. I agree that the YZF-600R is a wonderful bike, I would have bought one if it would have been in stock, but the ZX-6E is also very nice. If you are into more of a sport touring 600, you may even want to check ou a Katana....and they are cheap...uh, er,...I mean inexpensive. :)
Regardless, your riding skills will improve tremendously the first few months, you just have to have the brains not to go crazy on the bike. For what it's worth...my .02.



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John Lankford
2000 ZX-6R
Hampton, VA
[email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the bike recommendations you guys. I'm 6' and about 160lbs. Anybody have ideas about insurance costs on a 600 for an 18 year old with a clean record?

~Scott

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98 Mustang GT - x-pipe, springs, rack bushings, cat-back exhaust, K&N, clear corners, etc.
Bike - none yet
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ITisURturn:
Anybody have ideas about insurance costs on a 600 for an 18 year old with a clean record?
~Scott
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I would have replied earlier, but I was laughing too hard. Clean record or not, I'd be surprised if you could insure a 600 SPORTBIKE for under $1500/yr. Something like a Bandit 600 or SV650 may be $500 or less/yr. Check www.riderpoint.com


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Heeeere piggy piggy...
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ITisURturn:
Also, why do they race 250cc racing bikes if a 600cc sreet bike is middle of the road on the street?

~Scott

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

because a tz250 is a two stroke. they make about 82hp or so and weigh nothing.

but in all fairness to jeff wood, the guy i bought my 400 from was telling me that jeff was running 17's on an sv650.

the ex500 may not be the most fun streetbike in the world, but if you ride twisties, you'll have fun with. and what the hell is wrong with buying a strater bike and keeping for a year? this time of year, you'll likely get a good deal on one. hell the cost of bodywork on the r6 is more than a good gs550 or ex500 would cost.

and of course the sv650 flat rocks. it comes out of corners harders than a 600, but a good 600 will run it down in the straight.

if you do buy a nasty (non-boring) bike, don't waste your time with no 600, get a new gsx-r750. if you don't crash it, you'll love it and if you do, well, i need more used parts.

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Tony

the views and opinions expressed by tony (cbrf2boy) are the ramblings of a total idiot. sbw.com, it's administrators, moderators, and members don't necessarily agree with and are not responsible for anything this idiot has to say.

for more ramblings try cbrf2boy

[This message has been edited by cbrf2boy (edited September 27, 2000).]
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by cbrf2boy:


if you do buy a nasty (non-boring) bike, don't waste your time with no 600, get a new gsx-r750. if you don't crash it, you'll love it and if you do, well, i need more used parts.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ahhh what the hell - get a Hayabusa. :D


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I really should be working...
 
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