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Hi I'm new to riding bikes, well I rode some dirtbikes and quads when I was younger.

I found a 99 YZF R6, 14K Miles, seems to be in good condition mech and body wise, little crack tho in the bottom fairing. for $3000

Is this a good deal, would I be able to learn on this bike, is it forgiving?

I've been looking into zx6rs and cbrs as well, I can find a cbr f3 for $2900 w/ 2k miles on it. The zx6rs I am looking at however around about $4000+
 

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I have been shopping around for a beater bike and I feel, imo, that price is a bit high. I found some 2002+ bikes that had decent mileage and good condition for like maybe 1k more, max.

The R6 is fine for beginers imo. As long as you respect the bike and take it slow and learn, its no big deal. Just like crashing at 60mph on a dirtbike like my bro did is just like crashing 60 mph on a super sport.

alot of people will tell u the R6 is too much bike though. Eh, I wouldnt say it is too much, just imo as it is my first sportbike.

I drove dirtbikes and things, just make sure to keep speeds below what you would die at (you get the gut feeling when you reach a certain speed that, if u crash, u die) and if u crash big deal, u fix the bike.
 

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CypreSs187 said:
Just like crashing at 60mph on a dirtbike like my bro did is just like crashing 60 mph on a super sport.

I drove dirtbikes and things, just make sure to keep speeds below what you would die at (you get the gut feeling when you reach a certain speed that, if u crash, u die) and if u crash big deal, u fix the bike.
Crashing on the dirt at any speed is nothing at all like crashing on the street. :confused:

People have been killed crashing at 20 mph. And people have survived crashing at 200 mph. Using your speed as a primary indicator of how safe you are is over simplistic at best. Aside from keeping your speed sensible, things like wearing protective riding gear and taking the time to learn proper braking and cornering technique are important ways to increase your safety factor.
 

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zxrider said:
Crashing on the dirt at any speed is nothing at all like crashing on the street. :confused:

People have been killed crashing at 20 mph. And people have survived crashing at 200 mph. Using your speed as a primary indicator of how safe you are is over simplistic at best. Aside from keeping your speed sensible, things like wearing protective riding gear and taking the time to learn proper braking and cornering technique are important ways to increase your safety factor.
I agree. I was thinking in my head, cruising down a back road on a dirtbike at 60 is the same as 60 with a sportbike..

My bro crashed going 60 on a Dirtbike, broke his collar bone when he hit a rock, and the doctor told us if it had gone the other direction, rather than out, it would have punctured his heart, and death.

I agree, best thing to do is start out going slow and learning how the bike moves around. I took an MSF class and then practiced riding on back roads myself, wearing most of the protective gear.

You only live so long, enjoy it.
 

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CypreSs187 said:
...
The R6 is fine for beginers imo. As long as you respect the bike and take it slow and learn, its no big deal. ...

How long have you been riding in order to give this advice?
 

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mkeeney said:
How long have you been riding in order to give this advice?
A couple weeks and about 700 miles on my R6. Alot on dirt bike before. MSF class as well, for whatever that counts for.

In my opinion, if you are smart and don't go around pushing your limits its no big deal. I have been experiencing all of the different hazards of motorcycling on the street and its really preety simple; if you don't get nervous and make subtle inputs you will be fine. If theres gravel I don't hit a turn too fast, if theres water I don't break hard going to the light i just slow down ahead of time, I have been learning just fine on an R6. As long as you can handle the twitchy throttle I see no reason why you can't learn on an R6.

I have had a rear tire slide; recovered no big deal. I have had people turn in front of me on accident, no big deal. I have taken corners tight and fast, with a good amount of lean. I don't have chicken strips because I don't drive like a maniac in straights I just go the speed limit, and I gas the turns. The point is the best way to learn is to experience all of the scenarios and see how you handle them, just keep your cool and do it at medium speed so recovery is easy and if a crash happens it is minimal.

Call me an idiot but I don't think starting streetbikes with an R6 is a big deal. I don't lose confidence so I keep learning well. I would like to point out I never pretended to be an expert, I stated that the R6 is my first sportbike. I merely said for me, it is an easy bike to learn on. Especially after learning the basics of low speed at MSF and from learning from dirtbiking.
 

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It is all about respect for what the bike can do and a true realization of your abilities.

The moment you think you know more than you really do is the moment that bike will throw you off like a little punk.
 
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