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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I'm getting my first bike pretty soon and I wanted a cbr600F4i. However, after reading a lot of posts on this site, I see that people recommend learning on something like the Ninja 500ex and few agree that learning on a cbr600 is just as fine. Now, I want to learn to ride and be as safe as possible. I would rather start out on the cbr since I don't want to buy the ninja and then have to resell it to get a new bike later on. I want to make the best possible decision. So what do you guys think? Is the cbr a good idea? And I will be taking the MSF course.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I can ride a bicycle, that it for now. :D

I'm also 6'1" and about 190 lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Got it.

However, I wanted to ask, what is it exactly that makes the cbr more dangerous? Is it just the horsepower?

Also, can someone give me advice on some site where I can find good deals on bikes, besides cycletrader?
 

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might wanna take the MSF course first and see how comfortable you feel on a bike.

there's a big debate about starting on a 600, some such as myself have started on 600s and are still alive ::knocks on wood:: but would I suggest it to everyone? probably not, in fact there are times when I wished I picked up a 500 instead of a 600. but those usually occur when I make stupid mistakes on my bike and those have finally started to spread out and become less common :D

It is ultimately your decision, and if you decide to go the 600 route then I'd suggest sticking to hondas although I may be pretty biased. but another option is the suzuki sv650, I hear the v4 engine is good for beginners as well.
 

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I too, started on a 600, but I have lots of dirtbike experience, plus I have ridden many street bikes, from cruisers to 750Rs. The difficult thing about 600s is the lack of low end power(I feel). Its difficult to addjust to the snap of power at 10K Rpms. The SV 650 would be a good starter bike for you with your size and weight. They have friendly powerbands, and you can grow into it a little more than a 500. Like Nomad said, take the course first and see how you feel. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks a lot guys! I will take your advice and take the course first.

Do you guys know a good site with bikes for sale? Besides cycletrader.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thing about the sv650 is that it's expensive. In the beginning, I was hoping to find a ninja500 for less than 2 grand right now in the winter and the possibly sell it off in the summer so that I do not lose that much money and by that time, get myself a cbr. But then, throught talking with other people, I thought about getting a cbr from the start, where I can dish out some decent money and keep the bike. I guess I'm reconsidering that as well now.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You're right. I guess if I buy a nice Ninja500, I can maybe sell it in a year or two and not lose that much money and learn to ride as well.

Thanks man.
 

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Check out maybe CBR F4's if you want a 600. I learned on an F3 with no previous riding experience and it's a very forgiving bike, so I"m assuming the F4 isn't a big change.
 

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No offense, but it's a lot like comparing F4i and RR, there are similarities, but then there are differences. Caught in wrong situation, F4 isn't all that forgiving compared to something like SV650 or much older 600s like FZR. F4 ran against R6 and won many races, those years, only R6 and F4 ran on front the grids, as the GSXR was pretty old and ZX-6R weighed a ton. It was Nicky Hayden's ride back in 99-00. Picking up the first gen R6 and F4 is the same deal, only reason I'd refer the F4 for it's stronger low end and little less peak revs compared to R6. Not the best choice for first time rider, but then again, people start on literbikes.
 

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M/c riding is so different to cage driving for you have to BALANCE the bike from start to finish. It is like most other sports in that you have to learn from the start. True you have experience of driving cages on the street, so that will help. Still even if you get the same gear the experts have you cannot expect to appear at a baseball, baskeball, hockey or other such sports & be just as good as the others. There is that learning period.

Also if you have a small fender-bender with your cage & that of another cage, no matter who was in the wrong. Things have to be lettled & who's insurance will cover it all. Now IF it is you on a m/c & another cage then you are on the pavement & so is your bike. Chances are you will be whisked off to emergency ward to check on neck, back or limbs that might be damaged not to mention road rash IF you are not wearing protective gear all over the body & where your bike is only the police can possibly inform you. Though if you are in the hospital for a few days then it is even harder to find & possibly it to has been damaged a minor bit.

Now you can see why some people, including myself, try to get you to start out on a decent bike to learn on rather then a hot trotting 600cc sportbike that is with a very peaky engine & very unforgiving if the rider makes a small error or two. For we want to see you on the board & know you are enjoying the riding & taking the next step up. Not that you are another statistic of a killed or badly injured m/cist that will probably no longer ride.
 

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If you are not experience you must buy a small bike and some few cv,s.
You can buy a sportbike with cv,s limited too.
In my country ,Spain, during the first two years only you can ride bikes with cv,s limited.:hello:
Hi from Spain.
 

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The lovely looking sportbikes with all that ABS plastic really look sleek, but allow me to point out that if you are still in the learning stages & you stall the bike just as you were going to take off from the stop sign & said right turn, which is so common to even beginners of basically any bike though with the sportbike with a peaky engine & so poor pull at lower revs, it is even more common to do, you have ABS plastic that is all scratched up along with cracked & not easy to have corrected & repainted.

You accidently go down on the bike at city speed limits & it is far more costly. Do that same bit of going down at the max speed limit of the hwy & you will find the sportbike is now going to cost you around half the price of a new sportbike of the same make & model.

So learn on a bike that is more suitable for learning on & not all that glossy AND costly plastic on it.

Put a year on a learning bike to where you not only feel at home with it, but have pretty well pushed it to its limit & then you can take the next step up to something like the Suzy SV-650 or Kwacker 650 vertical twin OR possibly a 600cc sportbike though even then you might want to take it a sensible step at a time. Besides you will know so much more about the bikes along with their pros & cons to what will be the ideal next step & it will not scare the heck out of you.
 
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