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What did MZ and Suzuki have in common and how did this happen?

Aris
 

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ariszr7 said:
What did MZ and Suzuki have in common and how did this happen?

Aris
they both have a "Z" in their names. it happened because MZ, MuZ, can't figure out what to call themselves. :)

either that or they both had factories destroyed in ww2. or was it by earthquake.

don't you love my 3 guesses in one. i knew skorpion!!!
 

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Is it Ernst Degner who left the MZ race team and joined Suzuki and shared MZ's secrets...

Here is the link: http://digilander.iol.it/cuoccimix/ENGLISH-automotorusse9-r(MZ).htm

Between the '50s and '60s, the MZ factory launch the challenge in the GP competitions, with revolutionary two-stroke engines, equipped with rotating-disk induction valve. The MZ was the first factory to develope this system, that improves the performances of the engine at the high regimes. To understand the rilevance of this solution, we can see the recent successes of Aprilia, that won several GP with an engine equipped with rotating disk valve. Up (four pics), the most famous GP bike produced by MZ: the "RE 250", in-line twin cylinder, with over 50 hp. This bike won several GP, beating the best Western realizations with 4 stroke engines.

In the first pic up, another image of the "RE 250". The same rotary-valve technology, was used also in the "RE 125" (1956, second pic, with a total fairing, 16 hp and 155 km/h). Unfortunately, in the 1961, the German driver Ernst Degner (third pic, up, on a "RE 125" without fairing) escapes from the DDR, with the wife, the son...and the MZ's secrets, quickly used by the Suzuki team (and, with Degner, the Suzuki obtained the early success in the World Championship). In the fourth and fifth pics up, the MZ "RZ 250" of the early '70s (58 hp), and the "RZ 250/2" (1975, 62 hp, 115 kg, 240 km/h), the last GP bike realized by the Zschopau's factory, last expressions of an advanced two-stroke technical tradition (the MZ is back to the GP competitions over 20 years after, in the 1998).


Andy
 

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Andy WINS!

Andy you are the absolute winner!

Tony I really liked you 3 in 1 answer, but Andy was lets say, more accurate :D

I would like to add that the man behind MZ's 2 stroke technology was Walter Kaaden, a great engineer and designer. He was the first in the world to master the technology of 'disc valves' AND expansion chambers (which proved to be THE most important feqature for 2 strokes, nobody had a clue about that until then). Ernst Degner was not only the rider for the bike, but also an engineer and designer, so he was assisting his master and helping develop the bike.
MZ was beating the Japanese on a budget that seemed like a joke. Then Suzuki used their designs and started beating them with their own designs!

Aris
 
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