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Discussion Starter #1
I dont have the answer, but do have a clue of what there might be.....


+200HP engine
certain sensors, what?
Hi-end Computer
probably, 6axis accelerometers
traction controll


what do you think is the average wheelbase of em is? 60in? <-- bigger than a busa at 58.5in


I was watching a MotoGP championship, and it got me thinking.... do you think the computer does most of the power delivery work, and the rider is the corner carving brake master?
I'll exlpain, when they are in full lean exiting a corner while still leaned over pretty far.... are they controlling the throttle making sure that the massive engine doesnt flip the rear wheel loose giving a fish tail crash -OR- durring the exit, the computer already knows what lean angle you are at because of the accelerometer and hi-end computing, thus knowing, the rider pins the throttle every chance he can get and the computer manages how much power to deliver to the rear wheel with some algorithmic equation of speed, lean angle, tire grip, and such?



a convo:tp:
 

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The extent of involvement of a computer is what is being debated at this point. I am personally on Nicky's and The Doctor's side, that there should be some significant limits to the computers, otherwise you're throwing out the rider skill as a major factor.
 

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I don't think one could make a system that would do a good job of determining throttle openings just from the data available from accelerometers/suspension sensors/tire temperature sensors. There are too many variables still unaccounted for, you'd have to set your safety margins so high that you wouldn't be competitive.
For a computer to do the job well, it needs to know the ground speed. Not just make a good guess at it, but really know it. Typically, this is done with a front wheel speed sensors. I always thought one could rig up a small radar like device that would scan a few inches into the road surface and use a technology similar to that of an optical mouse.

Kanwisch: I'm torn on that one. On one hand, racing would be more exciting without high end traction control systems (one would think), but on the other hand, the riding world would greatly benefit from a well designed and tested system, and competitive racing is the only environment (IMO) that will produce a refined system.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
well with a 6axis accelerometer: all the speed data, lean angle, and constraints should be built into it. You woulnt need and radar sensors because the 6axis chip can access them all....
acceleration of the xyz over a peroid of time = speed
change in direction of the xyz = leanangle

throw in some tire-grip numbers and a equation, and the computer does the work**







not as easy as it sounds**
 

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Two problems with this idea.
1. Accelerometers can calculate your speed, but they have no way of checking the answer. The errors will compound over time, and I dont know for how long their idea of speed will be realistic, much less precise.
2. Tire grip numbers are useless. There are too many measurements, too many things to take into account. How is the tire flexing? How much is it worn? How did it wear? You may know the tire's temperature (at least on the surface), but what is the grounds temperature? Is it coarse or smooth? What is the humidity? Are there any other fluids on the ground? Sand? Etc.

What you really need is the grounds velocity with respect to the bike, and the tires velocity (contact patch part) with respect to the ground/bike. Only then do you have something meaningful to compare.

*velocity differs from speed in that it's a measurement that specifies direction as well as magnitude
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I still think it can/will be done, no dought. Its the final frontier for the public
 

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Don't disagree with you there, I'm just saying that accelerometers alone aren't enough to get it done
 
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