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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the process of putting my bike back together, I wanted a new double bubble windshield for it, but because it is an older bike, making it both hard and expensive to buy. $79 was the best price I could find one for, I figured what the hell I would pick up some plastic and try and make my own. I used the old one for a templete and added 4 inches. I heated up the plastic and bent it to shape and put it on the bike, I then heated up the top portion and gave it a little upward flare.. came out better than I thought it would
 

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it is made out of 1/8 acryllic, it was was pretty simple to make, I used the old windshield as a pattern. I laid out some newpaper and traced it out then added 4 inches to the top, for the height I wanted. I cut out the plastic with a pair of tin snips. I then used a heat gun to heat up the plastic and put enough bend in it to mount on the bike, I drilled a couple of holes in it and put in some bolts but did not tighten them down, I then used the heat gun to take the stress out of the plastic so it kept shape. Once I had the shape I tighten up the bolts and then worked on the top to give it a little more flare so it woud deflect the air of my shoulders when I sit on the bike.. I then took of the windshield and removed the protective coating that put on the plastic so it does get sctatched and remounted it....The only real prep I did was to practice on some scrap before I started to learn how much heat it would take to get it to bend but not bubble. I did learn that with this type of plastic it goes towards the heat and not away which you should keep in mind when your trying bend it...
 

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I am assuming you have some experience working with this material b/c of the whole plastic repair business. Any idea if the heat treatment weakens its resistance to impact (like a stone shot)? Also, are there different grades of acrylic, or is it just the thickness that counts? Necessity really is the mother of invention... of course frugality is the step-mother!:D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The plastic is like any metal, you can make it brittle by heating it to quickly and cooling it quickly, or heat it slow let it cool slow and make it more flexable. There was no real work in making the windshield. I was fabrication a part for a BMW 1200r when I got the idea to try. I was making a part that had multiple bends and twists and figured a windsheild would be easy. The advantage of what I do with plastic is that if gives me the courage to try almost anything when using it. My guess is that any guy with some common sense would have no trouble making his own shield, according to the place I got the plastic, what they sold me is the same type, as the one on the bike.. As I mention in my post above I tried a bunch of test parts before attempting the windshield. I have no reservations about using it when it comes to strength. I bent a buch of them in 90 degree plus angles and it still held it strength and maintained the same amount if elasticity
 

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Another way to bend it which may or may not work better is as follows:

find the general shape you want. Now make two pieces of wood and curve them how you want it. Wrap the wood in some form of cotton. Gentle drill holes into the acrylic and nail it to the wood. Unless you're going to a major curve it won't break. Put it into a preheated over at about 350 to 370 degrees. After about 2 minutes turn the oven off and let it gently cool down. Remove it from the wood and cut it to size.

Acrylic should bubble at about 400 degrees I think. Melts a little higher than that. It forms (depending on thickness) between 350 and 370.

BTW, I don't think that's considered a double bubble but rather a daytona style windshield.
 
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