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Discussion Starter #1
a simple task I'm sure but i have never done one....im helping out my friends father with his honda and would like to know the proper way to do it....it cant be the same as back in the bmx days where you grab wd-40 and hose it down, re-tape the baseball card to your frame and hit it...lol...
 

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depends on the chain but you should probably use an actual chain lube or SAE 80-90 weight gear oil. There is also chain wax, but you need to use a chain cleaner before applying it to get the dirt out... Either way here goes:

1. clean chain with chain cleaner
2. Apply chain lube.

For spray on lube just throw the bike up on a rear or center stand and spin the wheel while spraying, then run the chain throw a towel while spinning the wheel...

for gear lube just pour a little bit on the chain as it is rotating and then run ti through a towel to take off the excess...

The chain lube will usually spin off all over the place if you don't wipe it down pretty well. I wouldn't use wd-40 because it is bad for o-ring chains (eats the rings)
 

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So here's my opinion for what it's worth. If you want a really clean chain to start with get some motorex chain clean and clean off all the gunk. If you are less fussy (like me) grab a rag and spray some WD-40 on it and wipe the chain off real well. Usually takes a little time. I use a rear wheel stand, without one it will take forever to do right IMO. If the chain's never been checked or has been neglected, it's probably a good idea to do a careful inspection of all the links. Bend them all and make sure they move. If you have a blown out O-ring it may rust in the link and that link will stay bent. If you have a situation where it sounds like your chain is tight/loose/tight/loose as it's going around the chain wheels, it's a good bet you have a frozen link. Lubricating an O-Ring chain involves a few things. The chain is already lubricated internally, so really you are preventing surface rust and protecting the o-rings. The rest of the lubrication involves the aspect of cushing or damping the impact points between the chainwheels/chain and reducing friction (which reduces heat). Waxes are good and stick to the chain for protection but offer little to no cusion. The PJ1 blue/blacks offer more cusion but make a mess and attract dust. So really it's a matter of preference. My favorite of the actual chain lubes (I've used several) is the Honda Pro Chain Wax. It's got teflon in it so the chain friction is very low. It isn't that messy and offers some of the best rust protection for the chain. I also use dry teflon dupont lubricating spray. It stays dry so it doesn't make a mess, if any flings off it's easy to clean up and offers rust protection as well. And it's cheap. The only other advice is you should put enough on to coat the chain for protection but if you over do it all you'll do is make a mess. Some people go for rides before lubing their chain to help melt the wax on but I don't feel it's a necessary step. Try to spray the INSIDE of the chain when you lube it, the centrifical force will push the lube to the outside of the chain. This is for chain lube...the dry stuff it's better to get a light coat on the outside as well. HMMM...that's all I can think of right now and I've probably blabbed on enough. :D
 

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sodamninsane said:
I wouldn't use wd-40 because it is bad for o-ring chains (eats the rings)
A lot of people use WD-40. I've heard people say this eat the rings statement before. And although it's a crappy lubricant for a chain, there's no proof of it eating rings on any chain I've known or seen...or even heard about. I've read an article in sportrider (or motorcyclist..can't remember) of a chain expert from PJ1...and he couldn't confirm that either. The one thing I have heard is that it creates a protective layer on your chain that doesn't allow the wax to stick properly. Although this sounds logical to me, and prevents me from dousing my chain in WD-40 for cleaning, in my experience I've never had a problem. Especially if sprayed on the rag first and used to wipe off excess dirt and grease. The agents in the wax that allow it to spray out of the can disolves up enough to stick anyway. Matter of fact, I can't imagine chain wax NOT sticking that stuff dripped on your wheels is like glue!
 
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I use a Grunge Brush (actual product) and Maxima Clear lube..
Works great... I've used this product and washing sequence for a long time ( trail riding ) and I only have replaced one chain and that was due to a ton of stretch...

The WD-40 thing... IMO, it sucks... It makes an excellent cleaner but not a lubricant... I use it to clean sticky ass foam filter oil from my hands and it cleans like gasoline...

If you have a way to remove the chain, do it... Place it in an old (clean) anti-freeze bottle and fill it with a enough keroscene(sp) to cover it.. Shake it around and let it sit overnight.. Fish it out with a hanger, install and lube.. The solvent will not damage O-Rings and removes grease....
 
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Well, this is whats called for when cleaning rigging cables and pully chains.... So, with that said.. AND, you have it backwards... HEHEHE.. kerosene in WD-40, not WD-40 in kerosene... HAAHAHAA
 

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Discussion Starter #8
thanks guys....gonna bring this up with my friends dad next time we ride because that chain is so damn loud...the previous owner really never took care of the bike so i kinda take it upon myself to show him the ropes...i got everything else covered but the chain...i think ill go with the Honda stuff there Chuck...its a Honda 750 vlx deluxe (2002)...great shaped but just needs a little tlc to keep it in top running order...is the wax kinda like a harder type wax or like Sno-Shield for your boots where a heat gun after applying it would work really well?
 

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I use the WD-40 to clean as well. Then wipe it off and hose it down with the chain lube. My only problem was with the center stand thing...then I got to thinking (light bulb...not very bright but it came on) I have two small jack stands. Put one under the right swing arm spool then righted the bike and put the left side under. They didn't hit the tire and are pretty damn secure. Hey and they didn't cost me a hundred bucks. :D
 

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You are technically lubng the chain. The chains are sealed.....the most you are doing is putting lube on the rollars and sprockets.....anyway...use WD and clean the hell out of it.....and whipe it down....done
 

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HRC NICK 11 said:
The chains are sealed between the links but not between the rollers and the links.
Word. Chains are usually sealed with grease between the pins and bushings. The spray also lubes the bushing to roller contact. This is why people ride to heat their chains first, to get the wax and lube to melt and flow into these areas better.

Forgot to add. You should clean and lube your chain every 400-600 miles. As a safe measure of when, just lube it every 3rd fuel fill-up. Some say more often some say less...depends on conditions and lube quality.
 

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HRC NICK 11 said:
The chains are sealed between the links but not between the rollers and the links.

Doesn't really matter...how long do you think that lube stays on the rollars?
 
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