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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys,
I am new to the world of street bikes and am in need of lots of advice. First off let me introduce myself. My name is Andy, I’m 18, and from North Carolina. I’ve wanted a motorcycle for a long time, and finally trying to pursue this goal. I would like to own a street bike for the fun factor, and currently driving an F-150 with a 5.8l V8 is killing my wallet with these gas prices.

My first and biggest problem is my parents. Currently they are absolutely against me owning a street bike. They believe it’s too dangerous and say “as long as I’m under this roof its not happening” Did anyone else run into parents like this when they where my age? Can anyone shed some light on changing their minds?

Assuming I, in the end can change their minds I would also like some advice on what bike to get. I have ridden dirt bikes and four wheelers but not enough to amount to any real world experience. I have read about starting out on a 250, or 500 but not sure if they will fit me. I am 6 foot 1, and weigh 215 pounds. Will a smaller bike fit me, or will I need something like a 600 to be comfortable? I would like to buy used and not spend to much money for everything.

Thanks a lot,
Correll
 

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haha

What i did was buy it w.o telling them bring it home and surprise them. if your buying it with your own money why not? But then you have to respect your parents. b.c you do live under there roof. just show them your love for bikes, put pictures everywhere buy magazines and leave them on the dinner table or coffee table. be smart, and 600cc bike IS NOT a problem for you, both my friend and i started and learned on a 600cc bike, he has a R6 and i have a gsxr600. and plus your a big man, we are 140 LB lol...
 

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My parents didn't have a problem with me getting one, but they refused to give my any financial help at all. So getting a bike was tough since I had no credit history. I am 18 btw like yourself. So find out if it is ok if you spend your own hard earned money on it and they wont get mad. Or just move out. :)
 

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Re: haha

Yellowgixxer600 said:
...600cc bike IS NOT a problem for you, both my friend and i started and learned on a 600cc bike...
How long have you and your friend been riding?
 

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Re: about

Yellowgixxer600 said:
about a month now, we never laid it down so far.
Wow! A whole month!

Mate, you've got no right telling every man and his dog that he can start on a late-model 600 when you've only been riding a month.

:squid:
 

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Maybe. maybe not.
I started on a 750. A zephyr 750, which is one of them UJM. Definetly not a sportbike.
And at first I too thought that a 600 would be a fine starter. Hell, I thought that even a liter goes only as fast as you want it to.
Then I meet some kid in a parking lot talking about his new bike. half an hour later I'm pulling him out of a ditch. a month later, same thing. I find myself spending all saturday in the ER, waiting to hear on some kid I've never even met before. He had no family around, I figured someone has to be there for him. The same story repeats itself time and time again.. And let me tell you it gets old real quick. Nothing like the sight of blood and dismembered body parts to ruin your weekend.
So I went back to my thinking. I stopped with the attitude I have of "I can handle just about any bike, without getting in trouble" and thought about how I was riding when I first started. How I had to slow down to 3 mph to make a street corner. How I amazed I was when I figured the concept of counter steering, and "reverse countersteering". How I dropped my bike in the middle of the street becouse it stalled on me.
I really dont think its the horsepower thats a problem. Even a 250 can easily reach speed which will seriously hurt/kill a rider. Hey it doesnt take much. 30mph can be fatal.
But the responsivness of modern sportbikes is hard to deal with.
Less sporty bikes will stand up under braking. Thats really annoying if you are trying to haul ass, and brake deep into a corner. But on the other hand, available traction increases as the bike stands up, thus locking up the front tire is a tad harder. It takes time before you can feel the front brake, or the suspension. With some expirience, the bike talks to you, tells you whats going on. But not when you are new. Not when you got a death grip on the bars, every muscle tense, adrenaline surging as you pull out of the parking lot.
sure 600's are fun. I love stabbing away at the shifter, dropping 4 gears before a corner, trying to blip the throttle just right, so that I can hear the engine scream at 13000 rpm, rear tire sliding leaving marks on the pavement, as I set up to brake for the next. But the idea of either tire, sliding even a tad, was absolutely terrifying when I started. Hell leaning past 45 deg seemed insane. The bike could just fall at any moment.
Being a heavier guy only makes the problem worse. Sure the bike doesnt accelerate as hard. But the center of gravity is higher, which means the bike is twitchier. It means that any change in riders position going to affect the bike more. Does a new rider realize that? probly not. He will most likely continue to shift his weight, sending his bike into a bizzare wave instead of a line.
Can a 600 be civil? sure. But what happens when you get a little brave? Just a tad, just enough to push a corner at 10 mph over that "recommended" speed. And a deer jumps out in front of you? or there is an oil slick? or gravel? What happens when a sudden, panicked grab at the brake locks the front wheel, just for half a second, but enough to send the bars into a wild, ravanous dance. Enough to rip them out of your hands as the jerk from side to side faster than your eyes can see?
Or maybe you stabbed the rear brake, becouse you are afraid to touch the front. You feel the rear wheel slide, and it will slide so easily while leaned, giving way, untill you realize that very soon you will fall unless something happens? So you let go of the brake only to find the bike jerk so hard it throws you off, like a rag doll, and no matter how strong you think you are, you got no say in it what so ever?
So what do you do when you are flyind head first into the pavement, and your motorcycle now behind you, just far enough, threatening to run you over right as you make contact?
 

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Re: dude

Those "worst of the worse situations" are much more frequent than you think.

The reality is that a twitchy bike will get out of control much more easily than a beginner-friendly one.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I work two very well paying jobs so money is not a problem. They just seem to think bikes are too dangerouse and I will get killed.

Those of you that think a 600 is too big, what bike would suit me better considering my size?


Thanks,
Correll
 

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Bikes ARE dangerous and you CAN get killed, which is why most people on this site promote a responsible learning curve.

The Suzuki SV650 is often recommended to newbies. It's nowhere near as peaky as the 600cc race rep's, but will still have enough get up and go to keep you happy.

The picture shows it with an optional lower fairing. Looks much better than stock, IMO.

 

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Re: Re: about

cookeetree said:
Wow! A whole month!

Mate, you've got no right telling every man and his dog that he can start on a late-model 600 when you've only been riding a month.

:squid:

No shit. I've been riding motorcycles for just over 3 years and I have never laid a bike down either. However, there is no way in hell I would consider myself a seasoned or experienced rider at this point in time.

So you've been able to keep the bike upright for 30 days. Congratulations.

Sorry for my tone. I'm tired.
 

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Alot of it has to do with mental maturity. You have to realize the peril you are potentially going to put yourself in, and think of plans to get yourself out of those situations.

I've been doing this for over a couple years, and I don't consider myself seasoned. Everyplace you go is different. Every bike is different. I ride liter bikes because I have been riding a while, and I weigh alot. Not because of the appeal.

Stay away from other peoples opinions. Maybe you are the next Duhamel. But learn from those opinions. Maybe you are not.
 

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It's obvious you don't care

Yellowgixxer600 said:
you act like i care about your tone, this is the internet i dont take offence to heart lol.... get a life
What the fuck is the internet? - Jay

Back on point. You probably have had a hell of a good time on your bad ass yellow Gixxer and I'm sure you feel pretty confident. The problem is that there are a lot of people who will not be able to handle a situation where instinct should provide a way out. Instinct comes from learning over time how you as a rider will perform with a particular bike. Will a newbie rider be able to skillfully manipulate his/her Yellow Gixxer 600 in a bind? Maybe. But giving out general advice to new riders to go out and get a new 600 rocket on the assumption that everyone has the natural talent that you must have (after all you haven't killed yourself in a month) is a little irresponsible and misrepresents the skill needed to ride a sportbike.
 

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Correll, my parents would not let me get a motorcycle as long as I was living under their roof. I was working and had money to buy one myself. I respected my parents' rules even though I had a lot of resentment over that one, among others. But resentment is my problem, not theirs. How I handle the rule is my responsibility, and I chose respect over deceit and disrespect. It depends on your values. If you have values of disrespect then the way for you is as some may suggest (get the bike anyway).

There are other alternatives to a bike if your concern is the price of fueling your transportation. Cars like the Ford Focus get very good mileage, better than some bikes. They don't cost an arm and a leg, and you should not run into bad problems with insurance.

You need to consider some values beyond "I wanna bike". One is your relationship with your parents. Is that worth disturbing in order to serve your need to reduce your fuel costs? "Are there alternatives to achieve my goal of saving money on gas that will not harm my relationship with my parents?" It is not just because your parents will be upset and there will be consequences flowing from them if you buy a bike, it has to do with how you feel about yourself for doing something that will change the dynamics of your family life.

Personally, it was not worth it for me, and waiting to buy a bike worked out fine, I feel I enjoyed the experience a lot more by buying one later in life. A lot of things happened along the way that opened my eyes to many things, including the fragility of life. :2cents:
 
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