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I can pee farther than I "ride" a wheelie. Most of my wheelie attempts couldn't be considered "riding" one out like on a dirt bike but more like it's up & I'm frantically trying to keep it from looping out from under me. Of course I can only use one hand but that's a "piss" poor excuse:D
 

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300 yards. I'm too afraid to loop my only transportation to get really comfortable with the 'balance point' and ride out longer.
 

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Speaking of wheelies.....:finger: A few weeks ago, I picked up my 2001 R6 from the dealer after they installed a Yoshimura RS-3 Race slip-on and a Dyno Jet Stage 1 Jet Kit. While riding home, I stopped to fill up my gas tank. Anway, there were two other guys at the gas station on a gixxer 600 and a kawasaki zx-9. We started chatting, and they asked me if I "wheelied?" Well, I told them that I did not know how, and one of the guys told me that all I needed to do was "double pump" the throttle really fast, and it would come up. Well, I tried it using their method, and before I knew it, my front tire was standing straight up in the air!!!:twofinger Sad to say, I was hooked!! The next day, I rode to a deserted road, and practiced my wheelies. I actually got pretty good at it, and rode one for about 500 yards. Well, after I got back home, I noticed that one of my headlights had blown. Does wheelies cause bubls to blow?:mad: Also, can I cause damage to the bike by doing wheelies? I don't want to damage anything on my bike, nor do I want to "loosen" anything up by doing constant wheelies. (hell, I am paranoid as is. I have come to 'trust' my bike, but don't want to void any reliability just to ride a wheelie.) So, I think I am finished with the whole "wheelie" thing. They aren't as fun as dragging my knee or accelerating hard out of a turn anyway:twofinger But, I don't think I would feel comfortable doing these things if my bike is "shaky" becaue of a wheelie.

Take care all, and ride safe
 

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What do you think???

Do you think you can repeatedly drop your front end over and over without possible f**king something up. Don't get me wrong wheelies are cool and all. I saw a guy blow his fork seals when he came down once. Wheelies are cool, but if you don't know what you are doing, I have seen everything from ruined chains and sprockets (contstant torque and clutch wheelies) to fried engines. Watch out how you land, get the tire turned slightly and you may get a nasty high-side.:rolleyes:
 

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Re: What do you think???

FastHawk said:
Do you think you can repeatedly drop your front end over and over without possible f**king something up. Don't get me wrong wheelies are cool and all. I saw a guy blow his fork seals when he came down once. Wheelies are cool, but if you don't know what you are doing, I have seen everything from ruined chains and sprockets (contstant torque and clutch wheelies) to fried engines. Watch out how you land, get the tire turned slightly and you may get a nasty high-side.:rolleyes:
I feel exactly what you are saying. After trying wheelies for a couple of days, I am finished with them. I don't think it is worth the risk of tearing up my bike just to "look cool".
 

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Why people pull wheelies

It has been my experience- and no offense to anyone out there! That most of the riders who do wheelies and stoppies, do so because they either can't, or are not willing to put in the time to learn how to really be a rider. I'll take draggin' my knee thru an apex over a wheelie any day! That's where the skill really is. Any monkey can pop a clutch or squeeze a front brake lever; And believe me, when you are that good, the only wheelies you will be pulling are the true ones- The Power Wheelie! When a suid asks if I can wheelie, I say yeah, but you'll never see it. and when they ask why? Because when it happens, I'll be smokin' your ass!:finger:
 

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FastHawk,
Just curious....why are the two mutually exclusive? Ever see Valentino Rossi or Nicky Hayden ride a victory wheelie after they win a road race? Was that wheelie to compensate for the fact that they didn't drag their knee well enough during the race? What about the guys that win races without dragging knees? There are some, you know.
The group of guys that I ride with...me included.....ride wheelies. Only where it's safe, of course. Sometimes at track days that we put on, we even play around like that on the track. We also road race and all of us can drag our knees. That's no big deal. One of our guys had a Bandit 1200S with rear sets , and he actually dragged the engine cases. None of it is really any big deal when you know how to do it.
It seems to me that when it comes to wheelies, those that can, do and those that can't...well, they bitch about those that do. There is nothing at all wrong with people that don't ride wheelies. There is nothing wrong with those that do, either. Now if they are riding stunts in places where it's unsafe to do so, populated areas, traffic, kids playing, etc....then they have a problem. Everything has it's place and time. And, learning to safely do any of these things will also teach you someting about bike control and improve your skills overall.
So...you might smoke me, or any of my friends while doing a wheelie we can't see out of a corner exit...I'm not saying you can't. We've all been beaten by a lot of people. There's really only one way to know and that's go to the track and find out. But in the long run, it doesn't really matter. What matters is that everyone is doing what they like to do in the safest possible environment and to the best of their personal capabilities.
So people like to do one thing, some like to do another, that's all. And....some like to do all of it.
 

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Sorry!

As i said, I did not want to offend anyone, the point I am trying to make, is that at least in my opinion- it seems that too many unexperienced riders, and guys with no skills are popping wheelies, and as you said endangering themselves, and others. (I am in no way directing that at any specific person) I fully agree that everything- including wheelies- has a proper time and place. Hell, I like to lift one myself now and again. My point was that a focus on learning to control the bike you ride should be priority one, and the wheelies will follow naturally. I kinda let personal experiences influence my reply, but I am damn tired of 18y-old squids pulling up to me and asking if I pull wheelies- only to see them turn into specs on my rearviews at the first set of corners. I just more appreciate the skills you described you and your friends display.
 

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I like both A LOT (wheelies/corners) so have to agree with Bandit 100%. Well said.

It is embarrasing for us as sportbike enthusiasts to see the squids that only ride wheelies and have no respect for the people around them and thus do them in inappropriate places. It gives us a bad name and this is where responses like Fasthawk come from and are valid too. No one wants to encourage said behavior.

Now in response to your question about wear and tear on the bike. I have just recently in the last year started practicing wheelies and this is what I've found.

1] fork seals- you land hard and they'll eventually leak or blow. Keep the landings soft and they'll live very long lives. If they blow you're lookin at 150-200 bucks a set depending on if you bring the whole bike or just the forks.

2] head bearings- will loosen up from the landins and require retorqueing once in a while. I had to buy a special wrench at ~30 bucks and can do the whole operation in less than 45 minutes using a front and rear stands. If they loosen you'll feal a slight pop through the bars as you start braking or if at a standstill you lock the front wheel and bounce forwards and back. Eventually you may need to replace the bearings but since I haven't you must reallty have to suck to destroy these cause I've had my fair share of shitty landings.:D :D

3] my chain sprockets and clutch are all still going strong so no apparent problem there.

4] tranny is a little stiffer now from (possibly) botched 1st to 2nd clutchless shifts with the front up. Hence I no longer try to shift anymore. May be unrelated but ?????????????

Oversall I'm saying there can be some maintanence costs but nothing huge. To keep from racking up the expenses just progress slowly so you don't have thousands of hard landings.
 

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this is sad....

I first learned how to ride whenI was 10. now 17 years later I feel that I can ride pretty good. but I have never learned how to do a wheelie. people pull up next to me and ask how far I can hold a wheelie and I tell them that I havent figured that out yet. They normally laugh and say that I should get rid of my bike since I obviously dont know how to ride. Then I blow thier tankbags off at the first set of corners. I can lean my bike pretty good. Hell I have leaned so far that the body work has drug a few times.

I might try the double pump thing, but I really dont have much need to do wheelies. Id raher continue learning how to go faster and have more control in the corners. now If I could figure out how the hell Bostrom and all those guys get thier back tires to slide out while cornering now THAT I wanna be able to do. I can drift my car, but not my bike. Yet.....

Mike
 

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FastHawk,
I understand where you are coming from and I agree with you. I appreciate the E-mail, also.

Nipplebandit45, (cool name, by the way)

Why, exactly, do you want to slide the rear around? I would think that if you are dragging the bodywork, you would have experienced some slide by now. The object, in reality (on the RACETRACK !!), is to push your corner speed and on throttle point and corner exit drive to the point where you are right on the EDGE of sliding. That means you have found the limits of tire adhesion and suspension compliance and can carry no more speed through the corner. People like Matt Mladin, Nicky Hayden the Bostrom Brothers and others sometimes slide the rear around some, intentionally. I think this is as much a part of their psychological game with the other riders as anything else. A lot of it is to intimidate other racers a little and get them distracted from what they are doing. They are, in fact steering with the throttle. They get the rear tire spinning up while they are leaned over and the rear steps out, to the outside of the corner, pointing the front end more down the track. That is a very risky thing to do in a road race. If you step it out a little too far, you are in for a very entertaining time trying to get it back under control. If you do it enough times, you will crash. Highside crashes are a frequent result of this. If you are in too high a gear, when the rear starts to spin, it will spool up to match the throttle you have dialed in. Ugliness follows. That technique really doesn't do a lot to help cornering speed. You are much better off, IMHO, (unless you are Garry McCoy) to learn to brake later (more on-throttle time), carry braking deep into the corner (allows higher entry speeds and lets you get down to max corner speed at the same time you reach full lean...higher overall corner speed) and be smooth on the transition from brake to throttle (better out-drive without spinning up). If you are going to try to learn to carry brakes deep into the corners (trail-braking), start out with the front brake only. Keep your right foot (ball of the foot) on the peg and leave the rear brake alone. You will be clamping down hard on the front brake at first, pitching it into the corner and slowly easing off the brake down to the apex and throttle roll-on. It is scary as hell the first few times because you are pitching it into the corner at speeds that you can't possibly make the corner unless you lose some speed. The combination of the (decreasing) brakes you are carrying and the smaller radius of the edge of the tire (effective gear change) will scrub off the speed. This lets you move your brake marker deep into the corner entrance, therefore you have more full throttle time. As you get faster and brake later, you will begin to need the added slowing force of the rear brake. This part takes practice. When you are hauling it down that hard with the front, the rear is very light (or off the pavement completely) and very easy to lock up. You will find that the slower people use the rear, and the really fast ones use the rear. The fast guys (not the really fast ones) use only the front. There's a progression there....front and rear brakes(no trail braking, early brake marker)...a few scares(moving the brake marker down the track, braking harder)....front brakes only(learning trailbraking)....a few more scares(not enough stopping power)....front and rear brakes. This technique (trail braking) is a good one to know for the street, but not a good one to make a habit of using on the street. It can save your bacon if you see you are about to overcook into a corner, but it leaves no margin for error. It's great for passing in the corners on the track, though.

Whew! I was really rambling there, huh?

Stepping the bike out does look cool, though.
 

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LoveMyR6 said:
after I got back home, I noticed that one of my headlights had blown. Does wheelies cause bubls to blow?:mad: Also, can I cause damage to the bike by doing wheelies? I don't want to damage anything on my bike, nor do I want to "loosen" anything up by doing constant wheelies.

Doing wheelies is bad for your bike, the oil will run to th eback of the pan and away from the pick up:mad: :( . However, as long as you keep it to less than 1/4 mile and you don't wheelie at every chance you get that wont be a problem. If you don't learn to control your landings, you will start battering your front brackets, and fairing. Just learn to control your wheelies, than you will be able master the long distance.

By the way, my longest wheelie was 1.8 miles, standing on the back pegs in 3rd gear. Gotta love it:D ;)
 

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Re: Why people pull wheelies

FastHawk said:
It has been my experience- and no offense to anyone out there! That most of the riders who do wheelies and stoppies, do so because they either can't, or are not willing to put in the time to learn how to really be a rider. I'll take draggin' my knee thru an apex over a wheelie any day! That's where the skill really is. Any monkey can pop a clutch or squeeze a front brake lever; And believe me, when you are that good, the only wheelies you will be pulling are the true ones- The Power Wheelie! When a suid asks if I can wheelie, I say yeah, but you'll never see it. and when they ask why? Because when it happens, I'll be smokin' your ass!:finger:
You gotta love the guys who feel that they are better riders than people they don't even know.;) I love to wheelie, and I love to do stoppies, but with the exact same suspension settings, I'll drop my elbow to the ground. I just put an Attack rear-set on my F4i, and let me tell yeah, that shit don't drag no matter how low you go.:twofinger
 

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Well said Bandit. Im not going to touch on the subject because its endlessly debatable. Lets just keep it safe and have fun too.

As for sliding the rear out.. i thought they did that to come out of the turn straighter in effect giving them the opportunity to get on that gas earlier, harder, and straighter up then normal. Not to mention intimidating the riders behind him. :D
 

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Nemesis,
Yes, they do use that to steer AND to intimidate. What I was saying is that, in my opinion, steering with the rear wheel, although it looks cool, isn't the most consistent and controllable way to gain corner speed. Some of those guys have incredible control, but sliding and spinning the rear tends to cook tires faster, which changes the rate of slide and spin as the race progresses. That makes it more difficult to be real consistent and smooth. Smoothness is the key. Some of those guys are really good at it and it works for them. Most of them started out flattracking, though and learned early how to slide the rear around. That's how they get around the corners on the dirt tracks. Asphalt is a lot harder on tires (and human bodies) than dirt. Those guys are just as capable of using the brakes, though. They have both ways at their disposal, and you don't really see them sliding around every corner in a race.
 

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For all of you that are so worried about fork seals, get an R1. I have a '99 R1 that now has 93,500 miles on it. I had it in the shop this spring for a good tune up and thought I should finally replace the both fork seals. I had changed one of them at about 50,000 miles, but the other was the orginal seal. I replaced the steering stem bearings for the second time also and they really didn't look all that bad. I tend to do wheelies at every chance I can safely do them. I would estimate that my bike has done well over 10,000 wheelies. Living in Montana and now northern Minnesota, there are plenty of open straight roads to pull long 3rd gear wheelies on. I am like a lot of you, I would much rather be dragging my knees, but when we are blessed with roads with only intersections and completely straight roads there really isn't any chance for that.
 

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Some guy on a GSXR1000 last night rode a wheelie for about 3 1/2 miles at over 100 mph through curves and all that shit on interstate 80 in Sacramento! No fear or no brains! You decide.
 

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dunhamg said:
For all of you that are so worried about fork seals, get an R1. I have a '99 R1 that now has 93,500 miles on it.
MY GAWD DUDE. How do you get the time to put in those kinda miles? Long commute or do you take month long bike vacations every 6 mos?

What kind of chages have you made if any to make the r1 long distance friendly??

Other fixes you've had to make along the way?

Oil you run and change intervals?
 
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