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Discussion Starter #1
how are bikes on long trips, i don;t mean comfortable wise, i mean dependability

i have a new 04 gixxer, i put about 3500 miles on it already though in the first month, im planning on riding from orlando to new york, ive done it about 8-10 times on my mr2 in the last 2 years or so and i want to go up their in my bike, what i want to know is should i worry about my bike breaking down in such a long drive, i will be riding it for about 8-10 hours straight with just gas breaks, how is that on a bike? also what do i do if i blow out a tire? what are some other things i need to worry about, and what should i do before the long ride? its about 1000 miles
 

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Tony since your GSXR is new to you & you have NOT done any long runs. The very idea of 8-10 hrs on the bike frightens me.

I say this because this sportbike is really not a comfortable machine for long distance riding, that it will be your first attempt, & compared to a car you will be fatigued which will lead to you making errors on the road. Believe me 8-10 hrs on a m/c is more like 12 to 14 hrs in driving a cage & since the GSXR is not designed for cruising or long runs, then it will be more like 16 to 18 hrs.

Try using your cage or some more sensible means of transportation for this trip. Once back start out on runs of 3 to 4 to 5 to 6 to 8 hrs & see how you hold up. Many find that 3 to 5 hrs of steady riding, bar fuel stops & stretching still have them in pain.

If you have a flat then that is what you will have & no spare on the bike, like a cage, & in most cases a flat on a sportbike tyre means replacement of the tyre & not being patched up by a shop. Tack on the fact that no local garage will be your answer, like with a cage, & your first m/c shop might be closed or not have the tyre you need or possibly you will be forced to book an appointment a few days from your time of contact not to mention how do you get the bike there with a flat tyre.

It is a very different world out there on a m/c compared to a cage.
 

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I have just logged in 5 hour dive on my ZX12R and it dang near killed me. This was mostly done on the I80 at 85 - 90 mph. I found out that it takes a ton out of you both mentally and physically. By the time I got home and just crashed. Like what was said before I would be looking at taking your car if you had to go much farther.
 

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The bike will make it fine. The rider may not. :)

Make sure that your tires are good, nearly new, especially the rear. The highway is hard on them on a long trip and you need to have sufficient tread all of the way to the end of the trip in case it rains. It might be a good idea to put on a sport/touring tire instead of the good soft stuff that we like so much for twisty riding. Avon 46 series is one with many good reviews for that duty and is what's going on mine for my trip.

Those bikes with the more aggressive riding positions are harder on you on the long rides but it can be done. I'm going to be riding to Los Angeles from Pittsburgh BUT on a bike that's a little more suited to that kind of riding. The seating position and bar placement isn't quite as aggressive AND I ride a lot, keeping those affected muscles in shape for that.

Stop frequently for a short stretch, AT LEAST every hundred miles, and avoid sitting in one position for very long. At least every gas stop, get a drink to prevent dehydration and wash down your face and arms to keep you feeling fresh. It may sound silly but it helps A LOT. Especially important if it's hot. Move around on the seat right from the start so you don't get stiff. Feet back, feet forward on the pegs, slide a little right, a little left on the seat. Lean down, sit up. Once you get sore, the only cure is a LONG break, like sleeping.;)

Also a throttle lock like Vista- Cruise or throttle meister so you can give your right hand a break. The vista-cruise is cheap enough and I actually prefer how it functions but takes some creativity to adapt to the newer sport bikes. At the very least, you can get a throttle rocker that just clips onto your grip and lets you hold throttle with your palm instead of with a closed grip. They are cheap, too and aren't permanent. Just snap it on when you want it.

Being 1,000 miles, you should probably split it into two days, 500 each. That will make it very doable IF you are in shape for riding and/or follow the break and positioning guidelines. Set the goal to maintain 50 MPH AVERAGE for the time out. If you are cruising at 70, give or take, that's easily attainable with frequent quick stretch stops and a sit down lunch break of about an hour. It's easy arithmetic, too. You will accumulate reserve all morning, being ahead of your 50 mile average, and then burn it up at your lunch break, an important rest for the balance of your ride.

Fifty miles for every hour means 10 hours out for the 500 you're doing. On the road at seven, destination by 5:00. Shower, sit down for a nice dinner and an evening of relaxing. Take in the local sights and then a good nights sleep. Back at it in the AM. That's the general plan I use and by pacing the day you're able to monitor your progress which is easier on you mentally. You can see your goal being accomplished and know there is an end in sight.

If you stick to a plan like that, you'll make it fine. Leaving even earlier can be nice but the point remains the same. Even if you need more breaks, you can still be off the road by dark, an extra four hours if you need it. Good luck.:thumb:
 

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You've done some good rides already if you have 3500miles in the first month. As these guys already said, longer rides can really take it out of you, much moreso than in a car. My long legs get crunched up on a bike and I am poor about taking breaks when I ride solo. Around 225 miles, I really start feeling it and longest I've managed in a single day is ~400 miles.

Good luck.
 

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I did 500 miles on my r6 a few weekends ago, doing it again this weekend. Like dad said. Its inportant to break, Break at every rest stop unless they are 20 miles apart. do you breaks for gas sepearate, unless again its so close that is would not make sense. When you get to rest stops, gas station. Get water or maybe a sport drink, Don't drink Soda or stuff. You can have one or so but don't do it every time. Water is much better for you. When I did my trip almost 500 miles, I left around 6:30 am, and got to where I was going by 4:30pm. Thats about 10 hours. But I took my breaks It could of been less if I didn't take some many breaks. You trip is Two Days long don't try to do it stright.
 

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jrm said:
... My long legs get crunched up on a bike and I am poor about taking breaks when I ride solo. Around 225 miles, I really start feeling it and longest I've managed in a single day is ~400 miles.

Good luck.
That is the point of scheduling your stops from the very first. You may not feel the need early but it matters for later in the day. Once you get sore, there is no curing it but an overnight stop. That will happen much sooner if you don't take breaks all day. Good luck.
 

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What's up Tony? It's good to see someone else from Orlando on here. I made 2 trips to Texas on the 929 last year and loved it. I just got back from Georgia 2 weeks ago. I took I-4 to Volusia County and went North on I-95 the rest of the way. I-95 is absolutely miserable until Jacksonville because of the construction anytime during the day. As far as blow outs etc. check into AAA or something similar for roadside assistance. I'm a member of (HRCA Honda Rider's Club of America) which offers 24/7 roadside assistance, which is well worth it if you encounter any mechanical problems. I say go for it, you'll have a blast.
 

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A Honda 929 is a much more comfortable bike for long runs & so is a Yamaha YZF600r only latter has to soft a saddle.

I ride the two bikes several times of the week during riding season, clocking 5 to 6 hrs on each, but finding the 929 is more to my liking.

Compared to the extreme lean forward riding position of the GSXR both are more suited for hwy use & long rides.

Anyway some darn good tips above, so it is up to your Tony if you feel you can stand the odds against you or make that one trip by a more sensible means & then tone yourself for longer runs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
what about rain, how big of a problem is that gonna be for me?


cbr929_cholo,

what part of orlando you stay at? maybe i seen you around, i ride a yellow 04 gixxer, i live on kirkman rd, work at the airport
 

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TonyMontana said:
what about rain, how big of a problem is that gonna be for me?


cbr929_cholo,

what part of orlando you stay at? maybe i seen you around, i ride a yellow 04 gixxer, i live on kirkman rd, work at the airport

I stay by the University during school, and in Sanford during the summer. I'm either out on my 929 or my little brothers 600RR Have you been to Steak and Shake or Hooters on bike nights? I haven't made it to any yet, but I hear there are a bunch of bikes up there.

As far as rain, if you ride regularly in Florida you'll eventually get rained on, because of the sporadic weather here. Just slow down and don't lean as much and be vigilant because you're obviously harder for other drivers to see. I've been caught on I-4 in some storms and don't suggest venturing on there during rain because it's so torn up from construction the sliding around you do is pretty nerve racking :eek:
 

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In rain you need to slow down as mentioned above, you will need rain gear, & you need to stay father away from vehicles in front of you knowing your stopping time will not be as good. Also watch out where you have the tyres, for in the middle of the lane on the greasy strip is not good, on painted parts of the road to even the checkered passing lines to the straight yellow lines THESE are slippery not to mention raised higher then the road due to continual painting through the yrs. You can accidently put to much pressure on the front or rear brakes & the bike will go down quickly due to locking up & the fact that the wet road is slippery.

Big thing is to be able to keep the visor clean & once you have a cage in front of you, well you do not have windshield washers on the bike nor even wipers so that is going to be a problem.

Personally mine are better then new due to the work & what I put on them from Plexus, to SlipStream, to Armor All, to simple Pledge & that I carry a container of one of the above along with clean cotten cloths to STOP & clean off the helmet visor even if it means several times of my run be it rain or bugs splattered all over the visor.

Above are things you should be learning at the first part of your riding & NOT when on a LONG run & being new to you or still learning. Reason I put out my warning when you asked the question AND I still feel this run of yours should be by four wheels & not on your new bike.
 

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Have you ever just went out an rode for 8 - 10 hours or so. Not stright of course. But getting gas food and normal breaks you would take? I did this about 2 weeks before I was leaving on my trip from VA to NY to see how it felt.

I was a little sore but not to bad. I'd suggest doing this maybe two days stright, if that is how long your trip is going to take. That way you will know how it will feel. Have you been out on a major freeway yet with traffic? Is what you want to do is try to encounter all types of things that you know you will be expereincing on your trip before hand.

After you go out for a decent ride maybe not all day but a good part of it. Do you come home and go right to sleep are you sore at all? Are you still getting faimlar with your bike at all, or riding for that matter. I have a few more miles under my belt on my bike then you do. However I also have spent a lot of time in the drit. I know everyone says dirt is different and yes it is. But the clutch breaks and shifters are all in the same position

Smitty makes a vaild point. However you got to go out and learn sometime, but you got to be conftorable with it.
 

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If the bike you are riding 8-10 hrs a day is a GIXXER, the only thing you have to worry about breaking is your a$$!

Japanese sportbikes are overengineered, but not made for multiple long days in the saddle without incurring medical side effects like numb hands or hemmorrhoids.

My bike has gone from here to Florida, but compared to a new gixxer it is the Queen Mary.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
well i have been in every situation possible so far on my bike, i did;t get 3500 miles of riding in one month and not learn anything, p[rohably the worst situation i ever been on, and probably the most dangerous situation i think i ever been on in my life was when i was one day riding to work without a helmet (somebody had stolen it the day before and i hadent yet bought a new one) and i got caught in the biggest rain shower, i could not see abosoluteley nothing ande my glasses where fogged up, i had to stop the bike and ride on the side of the road about 10 miles an hour to get to work, soaking wet, i made it thru that one lukily but that day gave me a new fear for riding in the rain with my bike, even though i have a helmet now im stil scared because i think i won;t eb able to see nothing at all when it rains, i have used some rain shield spray on my helmet visor before but when it drizzels out here the rain drops still stick to my visor and i have to stop and wipe them off ocassionally, which is why i ask how much is that rain going to slow me down on the highway? am i gonna have to slow down to 30 miles an hour for the whole time it rains or what?
 

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I'm about as new as you like I said just a few more miles, The first time I got stuck in the rain, It was a down poor. Not just a light drizel. I had all the vents open on my jacket and the water when tright though them and dam at 50MPH that shit hurts.

I have since gained more confidance riding in the rain after reading what to do about it. First Rain X your shelid or what ever. On my bike I have found if I tuck in just right the wind will hit my shelid and force the water down. Or if I look to the left or right, the wind will push the water off the shelid. I have also found that you can wipe your shelid with your glove quickly and it will help a lot more then you think it would. If you get caught in the rain you have to decide. If its a down poor chance are its not going to last. Unless you are in VA where down poors have lasted hours. If its that bad you have to just get off the road under a bridge or under a gas station, and wait it out. If its just a steady rain, put your rain gear on and go. Just remember what ever one else has told you about riding in the rain.

I'm getting ready to leave for my trip from VA to NY. I check the weather and all looks good. Nice and clear this weekend. I could save space in my limted luggage that I can bring with me, but I figure if I don't bring the rain gear it will rain on me.
 

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If(?) your helmet visor is spotless, clean & waxed on the outside, well clean inside as well, then you are going to be forced to make stops no matter what.

Mind you with the clean & SLIPPERY finish of the outside of the visor at 60mph & up you can turn your head to left & right to find some of the rain run off.

Still if you are behind other vehicles then it going to be a bummer as their crap, drifting in the air to land on you, is also loaded with road crap. A few miles of this & you will have to stop & clean the visor to perfection so REASON I carry some cleaning liquid under my saddle & SEVERAL soft cotton cloths (try to stay away from paper cloths used to clean around the house as they tend to scratch & SCRATCHING is the start to the end of your visor) to do the job properly.

I wear bifocals with heavy metal frames & glass is hardened glass though fogging of the glasses does not come about. Because I know how to not be huffing & puffing inside of the helmet & there is always a large bandana under the seat as well for cool days with a trick of how to use it to halt fogging in colder Autumn & Spring weather. Said bandana can also be used as another cloth item to clean & wax the visor.

Personally I would not hesitate to ride clear across Cdn., but if I was with your bike & your limited experiece I would be questionable about this trip, of yours, for it is long & will be a toll on you physically & mentally.

Of course if your ego wins then it will be interesting to see whichj wins, the combined strain & muscles being put to work OR the ego OR should you have used a cage or other means of travelling?
 

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Just another quick note. I know you want to ride or least have your bike with you, Is there a possiblity of towing it some how. I know an MR2 is not the best tow pig but just a thought.
 

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i get some bar rizers and a comfy seat,you have plenty of motels between fla and ny.so dont push yourself.check the weather and
bring rain gear.have good locks with you.enjoy the ride.i have
ridden a gixxer 1000 03 model and the 929 ,954 02 models
compared to my 00 zx9.i'll be looking for a 1000 gixxer soon.
 
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