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My story isnt on bikes but close, on Snowmobiles, or sleds. here in colorado USA we get a good winter and have some of the best mountains in the world. well my best bud has a cabin up in the mountains and we went up for a weekend of snowmobiling and snowboarding. lucky us we had some girls to grace us with their presence. unlucky me, i do stupid stuff with girls. so the day before we were going to take our big sled trip, we took them out on a little run around some snow packed roads. these are some of the most fun ever because it is like ice, well i was lead, and was going into a corner when i realized i was going too fast, i hit the break but the breaks on those are either full on or full off, no middleground. so of course i locked the tred, normally this would not be a problem because you can just drift around the corner then, but unlucky me there was a patch of pavement right where my tread was going to be sideways. well my tread hit it and the sled just started rolling, it happend so fast i didnt even have enough time to bail, so it rolled on top of me. yea its fun trying to lift a 700 pound sled off your legs...NOT well thankfully we were riding with our helmets, and we were in our cold weather snow gear, so i only got some major brusing. after that the girl got off my friends and got on mine, and she drove, gotta love riding bitch to a girl. very humiliating. well thats my crashing story, oh yea the pic of me is just after i managed to lift it off, my friend decided it would be a great time to snap a pic for the memory:dunno:
 

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August 14 2007

Riding in St. Cloud 2 pm hot as hell. Got dehydrated, blacked out, and missed a curve @ 50 mph. Hit a big pole and spent 3 days in the hospital.

Moral: Drink water when it's hot.
 

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I was running down the backroads in Chester County PA doing about 55-60 in a straight line up and down hills. I was coming upon my right turn off onto another windy road.

The entrance to the road I was turning onto went downhill significnatly. As I slowed down to about 25 I started to lean in to turn onto the road.

There was flat gravel all over the entrance to the road and I low sided my gixxer doing about 20mph. She slid all the way onto the grass and I was more shocked than anything that this happened.

I got up and started her back up. She road but had severe hesistation all the way back to my house, and was leaking gas. It took me a whole year to figure out that I had chafed wires from the fall which caused a severe electrical problem leading to my dials blowing out and a slew of other problems.

Lesson is that you should expect the unexpected. Don't get anxious or over exited when riding. Basically just lower your risk by slowing down, especially on roads that may not be in the best condition. I now look for debris and understand how it only takes something like gravel to ruin your confidence and your bike!
 

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slickgt1 said:
Well look a couple of pages back I had a post before. Well here comes another one.

On 8/28, I got nailed by a VW Passat, into my right side. That was some shit to experience.

I purchased the bike a day before. I am excited it is a newer 2002 GSXR 600, (fuel injection rocks), the power is great, it feels nice. I made my friend / co-worker meet me at my house to watch my 6 just in case something happens to my new bike and I need a ride. Everything is great.

We approach our industrial area, and I get behind this Passat. We are doing 15mph behind this guy. I am thinking he is on crack because he is weaving in and out of lane. So I decide to keep it cool and stay behind him.

We come up to an intersection and I see that on the next block, a semi is comming out of a building, so I decide to turn left. Right before me, the passat actually goes to the right, crosses the intersection and stays to the right. I decide it is safe to take the left now and proceed. I go slow due to people crossing, all of a sudden some shit is hitting me in my leg and I go flying. I could not beleive this fucking shit happened out of nowhere. My friend cuts the guy off, and blocks him. Witnesses tell me that the guy started a U-Turn while I was rolling into the block.

Now the bike is trashed. Both left and right fairings are messed up. The fork bent, and the rim broke. He hit me from the right side, so everything went left. The upper fairing broke. My friend told me that once he hit me, the front of the bike got caught under his car and fliped over, sending me flying.

The bike still runs, and everything works, doesn't even leak. I guess it was slow enough.

Well for me. I came out better than my bike. I landed on my helmet, my jacker is scraped up on the right, my SIDI boots took the hit from the car and are all fucked up (right side). Oh I have a scratch on my left knee, about half inch long, a scratch on my ass :eek: , black and blues everywhere. Neck was sore for a couple of days from landing on my head I guess. Other than that, I am fine now, and rebuilding my bike. Can't wait to have it all up again. Oh, and I actually sold my old bike to my neighbour two days before that. So I have no bike for now. :hurl:

I don't know if this could have been avoided, but it teaches you a lesson. You never know when some moron will take you out for no reason.

Hopefully his insurance will pay for all of this. I have witnesses too.
Everytime I hear about something where "the driver didn't know you were right next to him" stories I ask myself if this could happen to me. Did you have a stock pipe on your bike? I think people overlook a loud exhaust as a crucial safety feature. A loud pipe in second gear at 8k slowly decelerating is a way tell people you are there. Thoughts?
 

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tlosman said:
Everytime I hear about something where "the driver didn't know you were right next to him" stories I ask myself if this could happen to me. Did you have a stock pipe on your bike? I think people overlook a loud exhaust as a crucial safety feature. A loud pipe in second gear at 8k slowly decelerating is a way tell people you are there. Thoughts?
Loud pipes only annoy the crap out of people. They sounds loud from behind you, but not much of the sound makes it in front.

They way I see it, dont rely on other drivers to see and avoid you. That should be your responcibility. Dont drive in other peoples blind spots. Dont get any closer to cages than you absolutely have to. If you have to get close to make a pass, make it quick, so you are out of the danger zone as quickly as possible. Dont give cagers a chance to hit you, and they wont.
 

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I've had a different experience with loud pipes. Vash is absolutely correct in his statement however, in addition to all those things I use the pipes to get people attention. I remember a lady getting ready to pull out in front of me who obviously didn't see me. I was about 200 feet away. I revved my engine and nearly scared the crap outta her. Kinda funny, but she noticed me. Of course, as I was revving the engine I was repositioning myself in the lane and slowing down in the event she still pulled out. You can't count on people seeing you or even doing the right thing once they do. I always expect everyone to do something stupid and remap my "exits" every second.
 

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damn fence!!!

Well, I am new to the forum and am about to get my first bike (01 F4i, or an 02 gsxr-600, help deciding would be great)

I must say these stories have really opened my eyes to what could happen out there, so I thank you all for sharing them.

Even though I have never owned/ridden a bike I do have a story to tell, its a dirt bike story, but I believe that some may benefit from it.

My older brother, about 17 at the time, had gotten a dirt bike and had been riding it around the small lake near our home for about 6 months. It was all dirt trails and owned by a rancher who would from time to time move his cattle across the trails.

My brother was very familiar with these trails and enjoyed circling the lake ( about a 20 min ride around). One day he went up there and was following the usuall path doing around 40-50 mph when he noticed a barbed wired fence standing across the path. It was shortly after a sharper turn so he could not stop in time. He hit the brakes and layed the bike down hoping to skid to a stop before hitting the fence but it didn't stop him soon enough.
He slid through the barbed wire, which knocked his helmut off, he suffered about a 4 in cut on his neck (very deep) along with shredding his lower lip up very badly, and getting some less serious cuts on his arms and legs.

He was knocked unconscious and rolled down an enbankment ending up on the edge of the highway that was near the path. We are not sure how long he was there for before a passerby saw him and put him in his car and took him to the E.R.

Luckly the cut on his neck was a mm or two away from his jugglar or he would not have made it. He received a bunch of stitches and we were all very glad that the passerby saw and helped him.

Lesson here I suppose: Don't get cocky just because you are familiar with the road you are travelling, you never know when some idiot farmer may leave something where it doesn't belong.

For this reason noone in my family is happy about my decision to purchase a sportbike, but I am an adult and am very aware of what could happen and WILL be cautious and not let myself push my own limits or the limits of my bike.

I realize I'm long winded and I apologize.
 

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Lions and Tigers and BEARS!! Oh my

The first time I ever went down (besides falling over & off-road stuff)) I hit a bear! I was underage, on a little dual purpose that belonged to a friend's brother, trying to get back to her house before dark. It was that time of evening when it just stinks to be out, not light ... but not dark. Headlights don't really help because it's not dark enough but things along the road all blend in. Came around a blind right corner, corner exits into a one lane stone bridge (signs everywhere and I knew the road well, so it was no surprise). I start to straighten up to go over the bridge, and see a bear walk into the road right at the other side of it. Think quick, fully upright, line the tires up, break hard. I think I'm gonna miss her, I should have enough room between her and the bridge wall to squeak by. And then she STOPS to look at me! I catch her hind quarters with my left leg, lose control, me and the bike slam into the bank. I remember laying there thinking "She's gonna eat me!" but she just stared at me for a few minutes and then finished crossing the road to go down the stream. I had some crapes and bruises, bike needed a few parts, but nothing really major for me or the machine. I got lucky!

LESSON: Never ever ride faster than you can stop in the distance you can see. You never know what's in the road ahead!


Second time I came flying over a little 'hump' in the road, caught air, landed badly and did not negotiate the left hand corner. Instead I went off the road, through the grass, and down over the embankment into the water. Scratches to the bike, but nothing injured except my pride (several of my friends witnessed that display of idiocy).
LESSON: Don't be an idiot. Need I say more? :squid:


Then, a year or so into my (finally legal) street riding career, I was coming home (less then two blocks from my apt.) making a right turn onto a one way street, looking more down past my front tire than down the street (I never expected anything to be there) when I look up and see a white van coming at me. One way, one lane. Cars parked on both sides, no where to go. I did the absolute worst thing I could have done. GRABBED the front brake. Hard. While still leaned over. Down I went. Slid in between two parked cars. Bashed my head/helmet off the curb. Again, I got lucky. I was really sore, I hit hard, but didn't slide far before I ran into the curb that stopped me.

LESSON: Wow, several. Don't stare at the ground in front of your bike. Don't panic grab the front brake like that ... apply it, don't grab it. Upright before emergency braking. And always have a plan of attack. I knew that street was narrow. I knew cars parked on both sides. I should have known sooner or later someone would go down it the wrong way and been aware of the possibility.

I haven't, thankfully, been down since. As a side note, the only crash I ever had that got me an ambulance ride to a trauma center was on an ATV, not a motorcycle!
*knock on wood that it was my first and ONLY*
 

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Bump Bump Crash!

I'd had the ninjette for, oh, an entire 8 days and had put a few hundred miles on it. Tried to get ahold of a friend of mine, I was wanting to tackle "The Snake" as it's called, a strip of highway 421 running through Johnson County, TN. Twistie goodness.

Didn't hear back from him, but I wanted to go anyway... so I did. Rode up 19E to 91, from there to the intersection of 421/91. I went right, and made it along fairly well... I'd been going slooooow, hardly leaning at all (still ride that way for this road, not familiar with it enough yet), but I was feeling good - nice weather, second week of September and we've had a massive drought this year, so wonderful riding weather. I remember thinking to myself, after looking at my speedo "25, 30 mph... I'm kicking a$$!!!" and suddenly, zip zip two riders go zipping by me, tapping the brakes and zipping along through the switchbacks at somewhere around 50 mph... I took that turn at a full 25, tops.

A mile or so later, I come to this downhill switchback, a darn tight left hairpin. I realized I was going too fast and got on the brakes, but too little too late... I made it halfway through the turn, and between my total newness and a little bit of target fixation, found myself going straight towards the guardrail, instead of on down the road (which is how I would rather have been going...)

Well, I can go straight into the guardrail, flip over the bike and go falling down a mountain, or I can lay it down... I'd recently fallen down a mountain on a hiking trip gone off-course... so I laid it down. I'd managed to get the bike off the perpendicular to be at about a 30 degree with the rail, fell off the left side of the bike landing on the road (I slid into the loose sand/gravel), and the bike slid sideways to the guardrail. Amid the cursing, I stood up and looked downhill, seeing two riders already turning around (I'm pretty sure it was the same two guys who passed me earlier). A few minutes later, I'm standing there talking to a group of over a half-dozen riders, they've pulled my bike out and taken off-adjusted-put back on my shift lever. I ride the bike (sputteringly) home and say more than a few thank-you prayers. I was fine, bike lost front turn signals and cracked the fairing a bit (opened up a wound from the previous owner's low-side)

Moral - If you can avoid it, don't ride solo, especially in some new twisties, and definitely not until you have plenty of experience. Don't go too fast, and don't think "Woo, I'm kicking a$$". Someone once told me the surest way to wreck is to think you are good.

Crash two - I'd come out of some twisties, took the highway back home. Stopped at a parking lot to make a phone call to a buddy, seeing what he was up to as I had the rest of the day to kill. Went back to the highway, was turning left so I had to cross the 2 lanes and median before going the way I wanted to go. There was no traffic, and I was feeling pretty good, I was leaning a bit on the turn and hit second... and I blipped the throttle. For some reason, my brain was thinking "downshift" while my body did "upshift". Back end kicked out, and I panicked again... I just didn't want to let go of the throttle, and wound second gear out as I drifted across the two lanes of highway and onto the shoulder. Ended up going into some vines at about 45-50 mph... again diving off the left side when I realized things weren't going good.

Moral - don't let adrenaline flow when riding. I was in a hurry to get to my pal's house and play some Halo3. Buggered my right thumb, aggravating an old injury from my childhood karate days. I have the helmet I was wearing on a shelf, housing my front turn-signal housing from my first crash in a robot-like arrangement. I'd just gotten that helmet too, darnit. The bike was fine, except the shift pedal was massively bent. When my buddy got there, I tried to start the bike a few times (was too stunned to notice the killswitch was off). Decided to let it air out, as I'd thought it had merely flooded, and when I set the sidestand down in the gravel, I walked away without checking. The one time I don't check to make sure it's stable, it falls... left mirror and clutch lever took each other out. Busted the mirror and broke the tip of the lever off... but on the plus side, the lever is better now as it curved outward in a very uncomfortable manner, but now it fits my hand perfectly.

Some closing thoughts that I've picked up...

"the number one cause of biker accidents is the nut that connects the handlebars to the seat"

Both crashes, my mesh armored jacket saved me greatly... first one I had a stiff arm, second one I torqued my thumb a great bit. Jacket held up with both pavement encounters, without a scratch to it. Always wear the proper gear... 80 dollar helmet, 80 dollar jacket, 40 dollar gloves, and blue jeans. Doesn't have to be the most expensive, but go for functionality (I'm looking into some boots now as well as full leathers for this coming spring).

Ya'll Take Care,
D
 

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Two things to keep you alive on the road

Everytime I hear about something where "the driver didn't know you were right next to him" stories I ask myself if this could happen to me. Did you have a stock pipe on your bike? I think people overlook a loud exhaust as a crucial safety feature. A loud pipe in second gear at 8k slowly decelerating is a way tell people you are there. Thoughts?
OK, I've been rider sport bikes for 30+ years...and haven't slowed much.

There are two things that have kept me alive over the years. So simple, even a cavemean can do it. :)

1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN !!!
Always look at all cars in striking distance of you! That means to either side, infront and behind. NEVER let this rule fail you. One slip can be you doom.
Look way ahead in traffic so you can be prepared...and prepare those behind you if you have to brake suddenly.(flash your brake light)

2. ALWAYS BE SEEN !!!
Never be in a blind spot. This differs with all cars. USE YOUR HORN for gods sake. Go to another country and you will see they use it often! If you still don't know if they see you, DON"T stay there!!!

Other tips: I believe in a offensive/defensive style of riding. "I" deside where I'm going to be on the road. I never let cars or traffic pin me in a bad spot. If I have to go 100 OR 0 to get out of harms way, I'll do it.
Use you brake light to get cars to back-off that are too close! Most riders get cruched from behind in traffic because cars don't stop as fast as bikes. so use your mirrors constantly.
Make eye contact with other drivers...or at least see where they are looking.

Be safe all you riders!
Be seen and keep your eyes OPEN
and of course...keep the rubber-side down...at least one tire anyways.

Zrider
...Now riding an SV1000s :)
 

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OK, I've been rider sport bikes for 30+ years...and haven't slowed much.

There are two things that have kept me alive over the years. So simple, even a cavemean can do it. :)

1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN !!!
Always look at all cars in striking distance of you! That means to either side, infront and behind. NEVER let this rule fail you. One slip can be you doom.
Look way ahead in traffic so you can be prepared...and prepare those behind you if you have to brake suddenly.(flash your brake light)

2. ALWAYS BE SEEN !!!
Never be in a blind spot. This differs with all cars. USE YOUR HORN for gods sake. Go to another country and you will see they use it often! If you still don't know if they see you, DON"T stay there!!!

Other tips: I believe in a offensive/defensive style of riding. "I" deside where I'm going to be on the road. I never let cars or traffic pin me in a bad spot. If I have to go 100 OR 0 to get out of harms way, I'll do it.
Use you brake light to get cars to back-off that are too close! Most riders get cruched from behind in traffic because cars don't stop as fast as bikes. so use your mirrors constantly.
Make eye contact with other drivers...or at least see where they are looking.

Be safe all you riders!
Be seen and keep your eyes OPEN
and of course...keep the rubber-side down...at least one tire anyways.

Zrider
...Now riding an SV1000s :)
Good suggestions, definitely. For me all but one crash, ironically, have resulted from my own failure to recognize I wasn't focused enough for the ride. That's the only other thing I'd add to your list. The two items you put up there I do actively and they have, indeed, saved me from many a collision :thumb:
 

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For me all but one crash, ironically, have resulted from my own failure to recognize I wasn't focused enough for the ride. That's the only other thing I'd add to your list.
+1. Lack of focus can cause a crash in no time. I'm a perfect example of that, since my first crash happened pulling out of a driveway. Shortest ride I ever took. I had several thousand miles under my belt, but that doesn't make a damn bit of difference.
 

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:ban:just got my 07 gsxr 600...bout 5 months on it..driving down a back road that i always ride...tons of tight turns and hills...anyways i was doin about 65mph round a turn( to left) and i see a bright a$$ orange sign saying loose gravel!!! yeah talk bout one fo those oh shit moments.. well i immediately started braking but too late, huge rocks, hell almost bricks...i went down no doubt doin about 50mph slid into an oak tree... tore the left side of my bike pretty bad...turns out a logging company just made a new gravel road and dropped some rocks(bricks) in the road...watch signs!!!!!!
 

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:ban:just got my 07 gsxr 600...bout 5 months on it..driving down a back road that i always ride...tons of tight turns and hills...anyways i was doin about 65mph round a turn( to left) and i see a bright a$$ orange sign saying loose gravel!!! yeah talk bout one fo those oh shit moments.. well i immediately started braking but too late, huge rocks, hell almost bricks...i went down no doubt doin about 50mph slid into an oak tree... tore the left side of my bike pretty bad...turns out a logging company just made a new gravel road and dropped some rocks(bricks) in the road...watch signs!!!!!!

So what is the proper procedure when you suddenly find yourself on loose gravel? I had a wipe out on a little Honda CT70 once when I entered a turn with gravel and had a bad habit of only braking with the front wheel. In a split second I was on the asphalt sideways. Had roadrash everywhere.
 

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So what is the proper procedure when you suddenly find yourself on loose gravel? I had a wipe out on a little Honda CT70 once when I entered a turn with gravel and had a bad habit of only braking with the front wheel. In a split second I was on the asphalt sideways. Had roadrash everywhere.
Well, the first rule is to have scouted the road you're going to be tearing up. At a minimum you should be completely familiar with it and know what risks might appear during any given season. 'Course that's easy to say sitting in the midwest with few quality sections as opposed to the coasties. If you've ever been to the track, hitting the street hard loses quite a bit of its luster.

If you hit gravel or grass, use rear brake only and lightly, keeping the bike straight up as much as possible with no sudden movements. Everything should be very smooth until you come to a stop.

Surprises in the roadway are just a fact of riding. Experience is the most likely guide through the trouble which is partly why the MSF courses (Beginner and Experienced) and track schoools are pushed.
 

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Just going to bring this thread back to life real quick. This hqppned to a friend of mine who unlike most of the people here didn't have a helmet on when he was riding.

It was a couple years ago when he was leading and I was following in my car and we where heading back to my place for the night. A oil truck had over turned earlier That night and some of the oil leaked onto the road. (Bet you can see where this is going ) well he hit a patch of oil going about 65 and went off to the right rolling while the bike went stright. Thank god that I was behind when I happened (3 am) had to have a metal plate put in his skull along with a couple stiches.
 

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Unfortunately I crashed the very first time I rode a motorcycle on the street. I was 18 and was way too cocky. I went off the road and onto someones lawn and slid on my stomach across the grass for maybe 30 feet. To show how smart I was, I was wearing zero protective clothing so it is good I was only going 40 mph and landed on the grass. Lesson learned. Now it is my Scorpion helmet and Joe Rocket gear ALL the time.
 
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