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Discussion Starter #1
I've been riding just over two years, I've had 2 accidents (1 major). I've never hi-sided, never low-sided. Those guys that have, did you learn more by having done so (in as far as the feedback from the bike when it is about to tell you to get off)? I've very rarely ridden a bike that didn't have fairings, and take the attitude that I can't afford to come off. (Especially with the excess I have on my current wheels!) I find I'm a little tentative around some corners where I know I /should/ be able to go faster.
Did you guys feel that you learned more by perhaps pushing it a little more and coming off that offsets the pains (financial and physical etc) of coming off?

Comments?

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Dave
CBR600F3
 

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I pushed it once - I was on my old 6R going through a corner at about 40-50mph. I hit some gravel, low-sided, and slid across the road.

I did learn a little bit about the limits of the bike, but otherwise, nothin'.

Don't be afraid to push your limits when you ride, because if you didn't, you'd never get any better. And don't worry about whether or not you 'should' go faster through a turn, because what you 'should' do is limited by what you 'can' do. I learned this lesson the hard way.

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Hey officer, wanna race????
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I come into a (unsigned) corner, and I know I should be able to do it at x speed, but I get this voice in my head that says: "I dunno ... it looks awful sharp" :)

Think that I should get to know the road better. (not by sliding over it, but riding it more).


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Dave
CBR600F3
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Aril, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Blackbird:
I come into a (unsigned) corner, and I know I should be able to do it at x speed, but I get this voice in my head that says: "I dunno ... it looks awful sharp" :)
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The voice in my head goes: "Gun it you moron! Just twist the grip as hard as you f*uckin' can!"

As for getting to know the road - "Practice make perfect."

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Hey officer, wanna race????
 
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Dave, being in the same apprehensive position that you are, I have solicited advice from a few experienced veterans of the sport (they are members here, but I will not divulge their names as their heads are already too swollen). The advice I always get is to do a track school - you'll better learn the capabilities of your bike in a much safer environment, and your riding abilities will improve dramatically. You take that knowledge to the street, factor in a sensible approach to the hazards of the road, and your enjoyment of the sport rises to a whole new level.

Like I said, that's the advice I have received, now I just have to put it to good use.

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Pete
"Ultimately, most problems can be solved by applying a large brick to the correct skull. Difficulties arise when you don't have a brick or can't find the the right skull. The Devil is always in the details."
 

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bird,

buy twist of the wrist 2, by keith code.

go in slower, get on the gas immediately, build into it.

the gas solves just about everything.

code refers to those voices as survival reactions (sr) and they are very dangerous to your well being.

check out www.superbikeschool.com for some details.

you can buy the book through barnes and noble off my webpage for a discounted price (i get a kick back).

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Tony

the views and opinions expressed by tony (cbrf2boy) are the ramblings of a total idiot. sbw.com, it's administrators, moderators, and members don't necessarily agree with and are not responsible for anything this idiot has to say.

for more ramblings try cbrf2boy

[This message has been edited by cbrf2boy (edited August 01, 2000).]
 

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The racetrack is obviously the best place to explore your cornering ability, but if it's not an option then here's what I do: I'll choose a particular turn, and go through it at X mph. I'll turn around, and come through again at X + 5, then X + 10, until I reach the point at which I'm no longer comfortable.
The hard part is usually knowing just how fast your entry speed is, because it can be difficult to find the time to look at the speedo when you're trying to set up for a fast turn. By gradually increasing your speed over a known piece of road, you minimize the possibility of crashing.

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all your comments guys (generic term including girls).
I would love to just "twist the grip as hard as I can" but I am aware that a 600 has enough hp to powerslide the rear. I would rather progressively explore this rather than opening the throttle full wide in a corner and having a sudden loss of traction that I am unprepared to negociate. :)
At the moment I'm saving my dosh for new leathers. I want a nice 2pc suit with armour in it. After that I'm saving my pennies for track school ($250US for a weekend of out on the track training). Would love to do that right now, but money is money :(

Cheers for that tidbit Tony - I'll try it next time I'm out for a ride. :)

Leon: yeah I do that. Amazing how much difference when you try it two up. Suddenly the ground is much closer and I'm scraping the right hand edge of my right hand boot (right hand corner of course :D) with the toe of the boot on the peg. :D

Got another question. You are going into a steep downhill corner. Engine braking is not enough to keep your speed down. Is it okay to keep both brakes on into the corner? I find it distinctly uncomfortable using my least effective brake (not incl engine) into a situation like this.

Thanks all.

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Dave
CBR600F3
 

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dave,

if you feel like you need to brake going through a corner (any corner), you probably went into it too fast (at the race track, this may not necessarily apply, but on the street where there's no plastic cups, it counts).

your rear tire is bigger for a reason. that's where you wanna have the weight. you should be accelerating through corners. i know it feels uncomfortable at first, but sometimes it's better to go in way too slow and then really accelerate through the turn. you'd be amazed at how much better the bike feels on the gas. you also get more clearance on the throttle, as the back end actually lifts under acceleration. if you look at pics of bikes flying down the front straight on the track, the suspension is almost fully expanded.



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Tony

the views and opinions expressed by tony (cbrf2boy) are the ramblings of a total idiot. sbw.com, it's administrators, moderators, and members don't necessarily agree with and are not responsible for anything this idiot has to say.

for more ramblings try cbrf2boy
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Tony, the problem was going into the corner I was at a good speed, but the bike was picking up speed because of the downhill slope. Go in slower I guess though.

I'll get there on the accelerating the whole way through corners.
Thanks.


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Dave
CBR600F3
 

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As far as braking in the corners, I have always heard you should use the clutch to slow down if you are in the middle of the corner after coming in a little fast. They say it doesnt effect the centrifugal force holding you to the road the way braking does. Dont know for sure but it doesnt feel uncomfortable when you do it.

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Dave

600 Bandit
 

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lowsided my old YZF. Learned Bridgestone tires suck my ass! Although I have heard some really good things about their newest models, I'm still superstious about trying them.

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I highsided my '00 F4 a few weeks ago and totaled the bike (Daily Rider forum: Toasted my CBR). Anyway, it happened because I hit some gravel around a slight turn and then the front grabbed all of a sudden, effectively throwing the bike into a CRAZY tankslapper that ended up throwing me at the curb and my bike at a pole nearby.

There was no warning beforehand, and I think that pretty much the only thing I learned is ALWAYS, no matter what, don't push your bike on any road you don't know. That way, you know what's coming up, and you can react to it accordingly. That's my advice, know your riding areas. PERIOD!!! Later dude, ride safe. :D

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~Nick
2000 CBR600F4 -
Lost to the Blacktop God. 4,699 miles in under 3 mos. $8,300 worth of damage to my one and only baby. On the brighter side: Can you say 929rr???
 
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