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Yes I am from KC and I already wrecked my 2400mile old yzf600r. I am still bed ridden after 2.5 months and going stir crazy.
I hope to be riding again but wondering if It is my fate to crash again or will that time be my only one?

Anyone who has crashed before... how did you get back on?

I have been telling everyone that I will never ride agian but I am not so sure anymore. I know that you all know the feeling of riding and I do not take drugs so I dont know how else to get that feeling.

What would you do after you have been staying at your parents house for 3 months as they take care of you because you cannot get out of your chair or the bed?

Kind of depressing I know but I am expected to make a full recovery. After another month I will be on my own agian and after a year I probably will never know it happened except for the scars and athritus.
 

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Strength and Honor
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After I had a pretty crazy-bad crash, I promised to make no decisions about my future of riding until at least a month later. I have family commitments that you don't so recognition that continuing could very seriously affect more than just my life had to be taken into account.

After a month, however, I decided that it was a learning process and I know what mistakes I had made and work hard to prevent them, like not riding when I can't focus on the ride. Its simply something I enjoy doing more than anything else (short of s3x :) ) and so giving it up just wasn't going to happen.

You might consider simply going track-only. This avoids all the dangers of street riding and is really where skills are learnt the fastest. For track bikes, insurance isn't necessary, beat up bikes are typical, don't need to pay the state to keep the bike (as long as you trailer it to the track), and you'll put less mileage on it. I presume, of course, you already have all the appropriate safety gear.

Whatever the case, you ought to give it some time and make a decision when you're not so involved in your recovery. My recovery was not as severe as yours, it sounds, which made a month sufficiently long to evaluate the risks and rewards and come to a decision appropriate for me and my circumstances.
 
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